Local Heart, Global Soul

February 27, 2015

Katharinenkirche: Through The Doors Of Detail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When we visited Frankfurt am Main in 2013, we stumbled on the fact the that the Frankfurt Marathon was on during one of the days of our stay only by the fact that we happened to be in the centre of the city at the time it was on.

Yesterday I made a blog post about the Hauptwache (guardhouse), but that’s not the only amazing building in this location because literally just steps away on the opposite side of the … we can find an amazing church: “Katharinenkirche” (St. Catherine’s Church)

Wikipedia  (link at bottom of the post) tells me that: ” Katharinenkirche is the largest Lutheran church in Frankfurt am Main, dedicated to the martyred early Christian saint, Catherine of Alexandria.

It is located in the old city centre near one of the most famous plazas in the city, the Hauptwache (Main Guard).

The current church building, built between 1678 and 1681 replaced the Ss. Catherine’s and Barbara Chapel from the late 14th century.  

With the adoption of the Lutheran Reformation by the Free Imperial City of Frankfurt in 1533 the city unilaterally appropriated all religious buildings within its old city centre.

This status was statutorily fixed in 1830 by the deeds of dotation, which is why St. Catherine’s is one of the city’s dotation churches left for eternal usage by a Lutheran congregation.

The German writer, artist, and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832) was baptized in this church in 1749.

This church is built in the baroque style and stands 54 meters in height. St. Catherine’s was destroyed in 1944 by the Allied bombing of Frankfurt am Main during the Second World War. The city reconstructed its church between 1950 and 1954. “

As with yesterday’s post, it’s hard to get photographs because of the barriers put up for the Frankfurt Marathon, but I do my best…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Catherine%27s_Church,_Frankfurt

February 26, 2015

Main Guardhouse (Hauptwache) Captures My Eye…

Filed under: Frankfurt am Main,Germany,photography — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I always have an eye for detail, especially when it comes to architectural detail on beautiful historic buildings.

Whilst watching the Frankfurt Marathon I spy one such beautiful building and want to find out more.

I find several websites (links at bottom of this post) and

“The Baroque Hauptwache is a former police station turned into a cafe.

It is located at the heart of Frankfurt’s inner city, centrally located in the middle of a large shopping area with several pedestrianized streets.

The Hauptwache is the central point from where landmarks like the Alte Oper, Eschenheimer Turm, Goethehaus and Paulskirche are all within walking distance.

In 1866 the Hauptwache lost its military function and was used as a police station until 1904 when the building became a café. It was rebuilt in 1954 after it was heavily damaged by bombardments during the Second World War.

Located at the central point of the city’s public transportation, the Hauptwache became an obstacle when the U-bahn (the subway) was built so in 1967 the building was dismantled stone by stone and later rebuilt on top of the U-bahn station.

The Hauptwache is located at the center of a large plaza, ‘An der Hauptwache’. It’s a good place to start shopping since it’s at the heart of Frankfurt’s shopping district.
The “Zeil”, Frankfurt’s main shopping street, starts east of Hauptwache. And on the west side are more shopping streets, including Goethestrasse and Grosse Bockenheimerstrasse. Those who’d rather stay put can have a drink at the Hauptwache’s popular café.”
It’s a little bit of a shame that during our 2013 visit I don’t get to see the building in it’s full glory due to the race barriers and crowds but on another visit, less busy and with less changeable weather  it would be a nice place to inspect properly over a nice leisurely lunch.
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hauptwache_%28Frankfurt_am_Main%29

http://www.aviewoncities.com/frankfurt/hauptwache.htm

February 25, 2015

The Helicopter Reveals The Runners Below…

Filed under: Frankfurt am Main,Germany,photography — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

We finally know what the helicopter hovering above us is about… one of the days we are visiting Frankfurt happens to be the day of the Frankfurt Marathon. We come across sectioned off streets and lines of runners pounding the pavements as the kilometres tick by. Himself took up running a few years ago and is busy building up between a half marathon and a full one.  At first he joked to my friend that he hoped that one of his first full marathons might be here in Frankfurt, but since he and I have spoken together about it since we made this trip, it’s possible that one day sooner than later, this might actually be the case. In the meantime we enjoy taking a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

February 24, 2015

A Hat-Tip To The Marketing Men…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are just leaving the amazing building and shopping centre that is MzZeil in Frankfurt when I hear Little Mr give out two loud exclamations.

The first is clearly delight and the second is single word stretched out like a sad moan of disappointment.

The first was a very high pitched shrieking exclamation of the word “Lego!!!!” announced like the discovery of the century, and the second was “Noooooo” as he realised that the shop he had just discovered is closed.

I must say that the image of my son pressed up against the shop-front glass with a face that didn’t  know if it was delighted or disappointed was rather funny, but I didn’t dare even crack even so much as a smile or a small fury at his helplessness would surely be unleashed.

We had found a dedicated Lego shop, and the clear glass shop-front window was probably the best marketing gimmick ever, because all the treasures inside were on display for any Lego-radar processing child to detect in an instant. Frankfurt instantly became Little Mr’s favourite city and he’s keen to return (any time when this shop is open of course).

Not so many meters away there was another sight to make me smile… a tiny glass door leading into a shop, one clearly made for children, and naturally alongside it, another door that was made to accommodate adults.Again, the shop was closed so we didn’t see our kids show us the small door in action, but the concept is sweet  and of course, again, directed directly at children.

I assume they have lost count of the number of  young ‘un’s  who have broken free from their parents and dashed in via the  little door, leaving the bemused parents to follow through the big one and then try and entice their child out without making a purchase.A hat-tip to marketing men / women for both shops… enticement comes in many forms and starts young these days.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

February 23, 2015

The Scene Is Set For A Shooting…

There are some things that you don’t expect to see when you are out and about and one of them is a fashion photo-shoot. That’s exactly what we saw when visited MyZeil in Frankfurt am Main. I have no idea if it was for a fashion student’s portfolio, a model looking to promote her career or for a magazine or catalogue, but it was interesting to watch and of course the location was stunning.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

February 22, 2015

Oops There’s A Hole In The Roof…And A Scary Escalator…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this archive post Family Kiwidutch are in the German city of Frankfurt and now visiting one of the cities iconic buildings: “MyZeil”.

MyZeil is a shopping centre complex in the centre of Frankfurt, designed by Roman architect Massimiliano Fuksas as part of the PalaisQuartier development. It’s main entrance on the Zeil, Frankfurt’s main shopping street. It was officially opened on 26 February 2009.

We enter by  a 45 meter escalator that is one of the longest in Germany that takes us directly to the fourth floor of the building.

I’m not sure if the escalator is steep or if it just seems that way because it’s so long and I’m on crutches but Himself helps me on and stands behind me so that I feel safer. I get some photographs from the top, looking down.

I find out some more information:

“Architectural highlight of the future Mall and Entertainment Center in the city centre of Frankfurt is its amorphous roof landscape which reminds of the formative conception of a Canyon. It covers the complete building complex.

The triangular structure of the roof penetrates the building inside, through light openings, and forms itself finally in the ground floor as a well-lit tunnel.

Inside fluid shaped spaces offer interesting view relations at all levels of the building. The daylight penetrates into the lower floors and creates a daylight-lit ambience. The fully glazed main facade continues the organically formed steel-glass roof and allows the pedestrians a view through the building into the sky by an inward trumpet formed deformation.

A 45m long express-escalator connects the street level directly with  a Piazza in the 4th floor containing catering and the accesses to the areas of Fitness, Wellness and Kidsworld above.The basic idea of the shopping mall is to create a vertical city by physical and visual connections inside the building, an urban shooping street with a new element – verticality.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Inside we find that the inside architecture is even more amazing than the outside… it’s mind-boggling that it was even possible to build this and the photographs don’t do it justice.

A comment on the TripAdvisor website also mentions:

“The use of toilet is free of cost in this mall. Also you can utilize the free WIFI access while you are in their garden area in the ground floor.

Besides, they also have facility to recharge your mobile device (30 min) in a locker, while you can stroll around and collect them afterwards.”

Address Zeil 106, 60313 Frankfurt am Main
Total area (GEA) 77,000 m2
Levels Eight levels, more than 100 shops

Special feature:  The longest interior suspended escalator in Germany with 45 m Expressway,

from the Ground Floor up to the 4th floor in ca. 120 seconds.

Entrances from Zeil 106 and Thurn-und-Taxis-Platz 4  //  Basement car park Entrance on Grosse Eschenheimer Strasse.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Escalator heading upwards…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Escalator views looking down…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The  escalator hangs in the space and disappears into the depths…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Views from even higher…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A four story  escalator is not for those who don’t have a head for heights… the levels drop away below us…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The roof becomes like the top of a funnel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and disappears down like a stream of water…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Going down in the lift, the glass doors show the building off all the way down…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A Café viewing terrace…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the views from the window…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Hmmm, We keep seeing this helicopter…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.architonic.com/aisht/myzeil-shopping-mall-part-of-the-palaisquartier-fuksas/5100026

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Attraction_Review-g187337-d2202504-Reviews-MyZeil-Frankfurt_Hesse.html

February 21, 2015

David Sits On A Goliath Of A Statue…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch are in Frankfurt and are now heading for the Zeil.

There’s a pedestrian area with a central avenue of trees and inside part of it we find a large artwork, an imposing statue.

Our friend tells me it’s called “David and Goliath”  so once we are back at her place I look up some background information.

On the Frankfurt Tourism website (link at bottom of this post) I find out that the sculptor is Richard Heß ( born Berlin 1937) and that:

“The sculpture was placed in a small depression, enabling pedestrians to get a better look at this unusual work of art.

Having vanquished his nemesis, Frankfurt’s representation of David is depicted sitting on Goliath’s decapitated head, with the enemy’s beaten corpse lying on a nearby heap.

Hess has fashioned David sporting both a helmet and slingshot, raising the question of whether Hess actually followed the bible’s version of events.

Many of Hess’ works deal with the subject of war, might, struggle and violence, and thus it is no surprise that his version of David and Goliath once again focuses on the sorry interaction of violence and retribution.”

We continue a very short distance down the der Hauptwache, where a very unusual sight awaits us…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.frankfurt-tourismus.de/en/Media/Attraktionen/David-and-Goliath

February 20, 2015

Liebfrauenkirche: Our Lady’s Church, Has A Long History…

Filed under: Frankfurt am Main,Germany,photography — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the Middle Ages the Liebfrauenberg was one of the most important places of Frankfurt’s Old Town.

Here glass, porcelain,  pottery, candles, rope and various chandlerly and household goods were sold..

Adjacent to the “Liebfrauenkirche” (Church of Our Lady) on the west side, can be found the “Staufenmauer”, the only remaining fragments of the 12th century city walls.

The Liebfrauenberg was first referred to in a text referring to the 14th-century Rossebühel, a name that fits  historically into the context of the nearby Ross market which was the location of the horse markets.

From 1318 the Liebfrauenberg was marked by a small chapel, donated by Wigelo of Wanebach and his wife Katharina von Hohenhaus.  It was known as St. Catherine, after its founder’s wife, but was apparently also known as Wigelskapelle at the same time. When Wigelo died his wife Katharina took over the administration of the chapel. When the chapel was expanded in 1325 and elevated to include a monastery, so the Archbishop of Mainz ordered its renaming and it became the  “Liebfrauenkirche” (Our Lady’s Church).

The stone relief over the Three Kings Portal from about 1425 is considered to be an extremely important work of art.

Historically  in the area there were routes to the Bockenheimer gate and the Friedberger gate but no connection between old and new, until a road was built connecting  Liebfrauenberg to Zeil in 1855.  This is why the church door opens to the south, though the church has the usual east-west orientation.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Between 1763 and 1771  comprehensive work was carried out that resulted in the baroque style features that characterises the church  today. The old spire was so dilapidated that it was replaced with the the spire that we see now.

The interior of the church had already been renewed in the Rococo style making it one of the most important interiors of it’s kind in the city.

The old altars were removed or displaced and replaced by including the high altar five new from Mainz workshops and during this time a new organ was procured from the workshop of Frankfurt organ maker Ernst Weegmann.  The new pulpit, also of Mainz, was completed then too.

On March 22, 1944, a massive air raid hit the historic old town of Frankfurt.

The Church of Our Lady burned out completely, the adjacent monastery was severely damaged. Much of the valuable equipment, including all nine altars, the pulpit, the late Gothic choir stalls and the organ from 1864 was destroyed. Only a small part: fragments of the high altar and a statue of Mary in the monastery courtyard facing niche of the external church wall, could be saved.

After the war, the choir of the church was given a temporary roof  in order to make it fit for worship again. The rest of the church remained more than ten years in ruins, until a full reconstruction began in 1955/56.

As with yesterday’s post, I have no clue what I did wrong with the camera exposure. when I know I will try to not do it again… and I can not guarantee that I will know any time soon.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Year of construction: approx. 1310-1478, 1506-09.
Architect: J. Östreicher

Kirche der Katholischen Liebfrauen-Gemeinde
Katholischer Kirchort Liebfrauen
Liebfrauenberg
60313 Frankfurt am Main

http://www.frankfurt.de/sixcms/detail.php?id=5021813&_ffmpar%5B_id_inhalt%5D=5021003

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebfrauenberg_%28Frankfurt_am_Main%29

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebfrauenkirche_%28Frankfurt_am_Main%29

February 19, 2015

Liebfrauenberg… A Square, And A (Partially) Square Fountain…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Liebfrauenberg in Frankfurt is the second largest square in the old town after the Römerburg and considered one of the most beautiful places of the city. By  1416 it was already paved and from 1490 a cattle market was held here.

At the end of the 15th century a fountain was erected in the square. A siege plan of 1552 indicates that circular wells were built and a fountain, already referred to with the same “Liebfrauenberg ” name as the square, was present to supply residents of nearby houses with water.

In 1573  there was a failed attempt to establish a fair for merchants and to build exhibition stands in the Liebfrauenberg.  It failed due to lack of demand but the place continued to remain a central and very popular place for the comings and goings of urban life.

The well in the  Liebfrauenberg was remodelled in 1594 into a fountain, but by 1769 the fountain needed to be demolished due to disrepair and was rebuilt in 1770 by sculptor Johann Michael Datzerat according to a plan by city architect Johann Andreas Liebhardt (1713-1788) in the late Baroque style.

The resulting fountain consists of a large oval fountain basin with beaded, curved rim parapet, in the centre of which stands a square fountain and an obelisk with baroque decorative elements.

Bronze plaques are embedded in the sides dedicated  to the river gods figures of Moenus and Rhenus (Main and Rhine). Water flows from pitchers into the expansive pools in the shape of shells, that rest on the crossed bodies of dolphins. The originals of the river god figurines Moenus and Rhenus are located in the park of the Liebieghaus.

From the shell basin, the water flows down into the actual fountain basin. From the mouths of the dolphins additional water flows in a directly into the pool. The Frankfurt city coat of arms adorns the front of the column and the tip of the obelisk features a gilded sun.

The Liebfrauenberg is located in the center of the northern Old Town. Dominated by the Gothic “Liebfrauenkirche” (Church of Our Lady) and close to the Kleinmarkthalle (indoor food market) it’s biggest feature is the Liebfrauenberg  fountain with it’s high obelisk column and sculptural elements.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During the Second World War, the fountain was protected by a sturdy wooden frame designed to preserve the sculptures from destruction.

The upper part of the obelisk and the fountain remained without cover and thus unprotected, and were fortunately miraculously spared by the bombs in the air raids that rained down on Frankfurt am Main.

In the 1960’s and  1970, the well,  figures and column  showed serious signs of deterioration so were copied by the sculptor Kurt Zobel and rebuilt. Since July 1973, the city council reintroduced and maintains the well and the flow of water in the fountain.

In the warmer months a flower market takes place at the Liebfrauenberg, during  Advent, the entire historic area caters to a large Christmas Market that runs all the way from the Liebfrauenberg to the Römerberg.

When we visited, the fountain sported an additional adornment: a supermarket shopping trolley, probably as the result of some drunken student prank. I also did something wrong with the settings on my camera and some of the photos came out looking overexposed. Still, some detail is better than none, right?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.frankfurt.de/sixcms/detail.php?id=5021813&_ffmpar%5B_id_inhalt%5D=5021003

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebfrauenberg_%28Frankfurt_am_Main%29  (German text only).

 

February 18, 2015

Art, Sculpture Or Sculpture, That Is The Question…

Filed under: Art,Frankfurt am Main,Germany,photography,Statues / Sculpture — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags:

Spied in Frankfurt, Germany… a wonderful piece of art, or is that sculpture or is that a statue? Whatever it is, I love it…

Our friend told us that it’s possible to look up inside it (best seen in first photograph, taken at dusk when the limits of low light and decent photography were being severely stretched)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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