Local Heart, Global Soul

October 1, 2016

When Stocky And Generous …Is a Beautiful Form.

Filed under: ART,FOOD,German Cuisine,GERMANY,My Reference Library,PHOTOGRAPHY,Stadtkyll — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next discovery in the Restaurant “La Grappa” in Stadtkyll, Germny became an excellent treat for a friend of ours back in The Hague.

It was a dark local beer that came in a large dark glass stocky bottle… one that contained roughly three litres of beer! (that is approx. 101.4 oz. for our North American friends).

Himself tried this beer by tasting a glass in the restaurant,  his opinion of this dark beer it was that it was that a little watery and not sweet enough for his tastes, but he also knew that one of our beer loving friends back home loves less sweet dark beers, hence this was an ideal gift to bring back for him to try.

The gift was greatly appreciated and enjoyed.

For me, not being a beer drinker at all,  I just enjoyed the generous and unusual form of these beautify stocky bottles.

Of course, being able to add this to my archive Inspiration drawing file is just a bonus feature in my artistic eyes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

La Grappa / Stadtkyll / Germany

 

September 30, 2016

Is It Really Just A Well kept Secret In This Part Of The World?

Filed under: GERMANY,PHOTOGRAPHY,Stadtkyll — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When we visited the “Gastwirtschaft Sünnen” restaurant in Steffln earlier in our holiday last summer, I assumed that the unusual bar we saw there was a one-off adaption.

Then we found ourselves visiting the Restaurant “La Grappa” in Stadtkyll  for lunch and it becomes apparent that these sorts of unusual bars are some sort of regional feature, albeit that they make each one to fit the space available.

The “La Grappa” one is smaller than the first one we saw, it features the padded bench seat but then there is only one “island” (or should that be “peninsular?”) sticking out instead of the two in “Gastwirtschaft Sünnen”.

I’ve added the link for the previous bar at the bottom of this post so that you can compare the two, this one is not just smaller but also features a plainer  and more modern look, with a metal band around the side of the bar instead of the wooden rails and brass fittings.

Personally I prefer the other one, but I’m a sucker for brass fittings and the round turned hand rails. It’s certainly an excellent idea to maximise the available space around a bar, at a guess you could almost double the number of patrons using this formation rather than with just a straight short length of bar. Once again this is an idea that I am rather surprised has not caught on in more areas around the globe… is it really just a well kept secret in this region of the world?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sit At A Double Tier Bar, … On Your Bench Seat!

La Grappa / Stadtkyll / Germany

September 29, 2016

Wonderfully Made And Stunning To Look At…

Filed under: ART,GERMANY,My Reference Library,Objet d'art,Stadtkyll — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

The next thing that I found to captivate my lens in Restaurant “La Grappa” in Stadtkyll, Germany is a beautiful old till / cash register.  I adore old things like this, they are both wonderfully made and stunning to look at, What more does anyone need?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

La Grappa / Stadtkyll / Germany

September 28, 2016

Like Waiting For A Bus, Then Two Come Along At Once…

Filed under: GERMANY,PHOTOGRAPHY,Stadtkyll — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post, last summer we were having lunch in the Restaurant “La Grappa” in the small German town of  Stadtkyll.

As usual I am having a look around with my camera and on this day I was not disappointed.

It seems ironic that I discover something brand spanking new to me and then within the space of one trip I find two places that have different versions of exactly the same thing.

This is another communal money saving box, “Sparschraenke-Sparkassetten” (savings boxes /money boxes with separate slots)  also located in a pub, of a slightly different style to the other one but of course with the same purpose. (Link to this previous post can be found at the bottom of this post)

This one differs from the first in that it has name tags at the bottom of each of the slots to supplement the printed numbers that come on these boxes. Finding this is like waiting for a bus and then having two come along at once.
As per my previous post, I think these are a fabulous idea and I’m delighted to have heard from readers that these boxes are available in pubs and places like working men’s clubs in other places and countries too.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

La Grappa / Stadtkyll / Germany

A Giant Money-Box In The Bar?

September 27, 2016

La Grappa In Stadtkyll Looks Like A Great Place For Lunch…

Last summer Family Kiwidutch spent a family holiday at the Landal Wirfttal holiday park in Germany. One day we after doing some local sightseeing we stopped in the nearby town of Stadtkyll for lunch and chose a restaurant called “La Grappa“. As usual we arrived later for lunch so there were few other patrons inside but permission to take photographs was granted and I got busy whilst we waited for our food to arrive.

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 (photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

La Grappa / Stadtkyll / Germany

September 26, 2016

Enjoying The Open Spaces…

The area around Stadtkyll  makes for excellent touring and sightseeing. We made many trips around the area, enjoying the open space and less built up nature of this part of Germany. Life in the Netherlands has many bonuses but seemingly endless vistas of open countryside is not to be counted amongst them. For us at least, this is completely refreshing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

September 25, 2016

Kid Friendly And Edible… Bonus Points Indeed.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

After leaving the city of Trier, Germany, Family Kiwidutch last summer returned to our holiday accommodation base at the Landal Wirfttal holiday park near Stadtkyll.

Like many of our day trips out, we arrived back too late to contemplate cooking ourselves, so opted for dinner in the on-site restaurant.

This post is a compilation of a series of meals… we basically worked our way through a decent part of their menu.

Little Mr changed his order by varying the amount of grated cheese he heaped on top of his plain boiled pasta, or by changing the flavour of his ice-cream from vanilla to strawberry (shock horror that he might one day stray further off the culinary pieste!).

The cooking isn’t the best of all of the various Landal parks we have been in, in fact my expectations were higher because we have come to expect better food in Germany than the Netherlands. That said, it was kid friendly and edible… true bonus points after busy days out and arriving back tired.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Landal Wirfttal

 

September 24, 2016

Keeping It’s Photogenic Qualities As Well As it’s History…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the buildings in Trier’s main shopping street that makes visitors stop and stare is a white, orange and brown painted building that at first glance thought might be art deco, but quickly realised is far too old for that and has it’s windows in strange places.

There is a decorative shield on the wall, but also an information plaque on the wall which Himself translated for me as much as he could.

It reads: ” The House of Three Kings“,  “The original house ” Zum Säulchen” further developed into a residential tower with a façade that around 1230 changed from Roman style to Gothic.

The painting style is late “staufisch” dynasty style.

The main entrance was reached by stairs. Previous residents included that of an alderman family from Trier.

Renovated / restored 1938 and 1973.
There were a few words that he didn’t know and which we also couldn’t find in our German dictionaries, but we got the general idea.

I was however interested in tying to find out more so looked on line and found more information (website links at the bottom of this post) which revealed this to be called this the “House of the Three Magi” (Dreikoenigenhaus).

There I learned: “… built when the medieval wall around Trier was not yet finished, the main entrance was the door on the first floor that was reached by ladder or retractable stairs, a necessary defensive feature”. 

Now the penny drops because we saw a similar but older residential tower, the “Frankenturm” when we arrived here.

‘The doors at street level are a modern addition, the building now houses a café so patrons have some limited access but the rest of the building is not open to the public.”

It’s an interesting building that keeps it’s photogenic qualities along with much of it’s history and it also goes to prove that when some tradesman all those centuries ago told the client that his work could be relied upon to be ” built to last”, he certainly meant it!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Trier Tourismus und Marketing / The House of the Three Magi

Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

September 23, 2016

What Makeup Would You Put On A Face Like This? …None At All.

Filed under: Architectural Detail,ART,GERMANY,PHOTOGRAPHY,Trier,Trier: Porta Nigra — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer I discovered Germany’s oldest city and the “Black Gate” that is one of it’s most imposing landmarks: The Porta Nigra.

Since I had a lot to learn about this amazing structure I started reding up on the internet. Wikipedia (link at the bottom of this page) tells us:
In 1802 Napoleon Bonaparte dissolved the church in the Porta Nigra and the monastery beside it, along with the vast majority of Trier’s numerous churches and monasteries.

On his visit to Trier in 1804, Napoleon ordered that the Porta Nigra be converted back to its Roman form. Only the apse was kept; but the eastern tower was not rebuilt to its original height.

Local legend has it that Napoleon originally wanted to completely tear down the church, but locals convinced him that the church had actually been a Gaulish festival hall before being turned into a church.

In another version, they told him about its Roman origins, persuading him to convert the gate back to its original form.
The modern appearance of the Porta Nigra goes back almost unchanged to the reconstruction ordered by Napoleon. At the south side of the Porta Nigra, remains of Roman columns line the last 100 m of the street leading to the gate.

Positioned where they had stood in Roman times, they give a slight impression of the aspect of the original Roman street that was lined with colonnades. It also has crowning cornice and parapet on its top.
The gate is today closed to cars, but stands right next to one of the main streets of Trier. In addition to the general pollution, the exhaust fumes of the passing cars have been damaging the stones for decades. Generally, however, the Porta Nigra is still in remarkable condition.

The Porta Nigra, including the upper floors, is open to visitors. In summer, guided tours are also offered by an actor dressed up as and portraying a centurion (a Roman army officer) in full armour.
In 1986 the Porta Nigra was designated a World Heritage Site, along with other Roman monuments in Trier and its surroundings.”

Whilst photographing the inside section of the gate, I saw various groups of people on the upper floors but there were too many stairs for me to be able to join them.

Content with the views from below I take as many photographs as I can, trying to capture it’s many angles and complex secrets of a structure built in Roman times, without machinery or modern tools or labour saving conveniences.

The towers are high and strong, the walls deeply pitted due to the ravages of both times of war and times of peace. No make-up job is ever going to cover up the signs of wear, but in the end it’s pits and scars are testament of a long life and countless events having taken place below and around it’s walls. Porta Nigra has stood for more than a thousand years… here’s to its’ next thousand.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

porta-nigra-trier-4e-small

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia / Porta Nigra / Trier / Germany
 Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

September 22, 2016

A Very Good Looking Rear…

Filed under: Architectural Detail,ART,GERMANY,PHOTOGRAPHY,Trier,Trier: Porta Nigra — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

The back side of the Porta Nigra, or “Black Gate” in Trier, Germany, is no less impressive than the front. Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia / Porta Nigra / Trier / Germany

 

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.