Local Heart, Global Soul

July 8, 2015

Good Intentions And Afterwards, Dinner Out…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On our visit to Maastricht several years ago we spent the first day in the city itself and then headed out of town to a Landaal Holiday Park located close to the small town of Vaals.

Almost as soon as the suitcases had hit their  various bedroom floors, the kids were begging to go to the indoor swimming pool on site.

I  sorted out the rest of their clothes whilst Himself took them to the pool.

I intended to start a simple pasta dinner and told Himself it would be pretty much ready by the time they got back but I was a bit tired from the mornings walk and thought I’d take a short rest on the bed first.

Good intentions are wonderful but of course I fell asleep and was only woken by Little Mr’s usual loud entrance after their swim.

We quickly changed the plan and decided to eat at the on site restaurant.

Little Mr was delighted and headed for the “kinder buffet” which is where you order the children’s menu and get to take a plate to the special kid buffet bar where fries, chicken nuggets (his favourite, but barred at home), apple sauce, ice-cream and poffetjes are on offer.

Kiwi Daughter got adventurous with some tomato soup but diverted to less healthy food later as she adds fries to her order. Himself goes for a cheese fondue and I, thinking that this area is well known for it’s culinary skills, and we are close to Germany, order a schnitzel. I was disappointed that the promise that the anticipation generated wasn’t fulfilled in reality by a stunning  meal, it was perfectly edible but definaitely not the culinary wonder that I’d been hoping for. Little Mr. however seemed to get the deal of the day: his meal in the under-12’s menu included unlimited returns, including the ice-cream cones! His kill-joy parents put a limit of one top up on this which he contested with disgust, but in the end he ate so much before desert that he had trouble even to finish the first ice-cream!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 7, 2015

Taking A Look Around Our Place Of Stay…

Filed under: Maastricht: Landal Holiday Park,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags:

The Landal Holiday Parks offer a mixture of entertainment and house privacy… Since I stayed resting up in the house a lot of the time I didn’t see even a fraction of it… the pool, bowling alley etc… Here’s what I did manage to see…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Farmhouse in the distance, in the valley below…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “bear” is “Bollo” the Park’s mascot… used in everything from colouring competitions to Summer time kids programme…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Main Entrance and reception…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Indoor play area, with elevated climbing frames etc… our kids say they are too old for it but secretly love it…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 6, 2015

Kids On Holiday: Parents Learn From Their Mistakes…

As some of you saw yesterday, I completely messed up several posts by labelling two posts and three not-yet-started draft pages (that I forgot about), all with yesterday’s date. As a result you got one post that was meant for today and I had to go back and renumber quite a few posts in my schedule. I can only apologise for the weirdness, the necessary increases in morphine are really messing with my concentration skills and I’m making multiple mistakes on everything from A-Z in everyday life, not just here on my blog.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The holiday park where we had a summer break a couple of years ago is part of a chain called the “Landal Holiday Parks”, and we’ve already been to several of them in years past.

Ideally Himself and I would prefer to rent a Gîte de France, or something like it: an independent stand alone holiday house in the countryside.

As a couple we have done this many times but now that we have kids, things become more complicated.

Isolated houses are Himself and my idea of heaven but for two children in spite of there being a swimming pool on site, it means having no other children to play with so they spend the entire holiday taking this frustration out on each other.

After at least three holidays involving scrapping children we got the message and revamped our holiday location plans.

The Landal Parks offer individual holiday house of various sizes and prices and a family friendly environment, where if the children are old enough, they can race around the complex on bikes or spend time on and at the myriad of entertainments provided. Some of the Park’s, like this one, also have a policy where car driving is only allowed for arrival and departure, cars must be parked by the main entrance the rest of the time. Less mobile people like me can apply for special exemption, so our car can remain parked by the house, but the result of this policy is that there are almost no cars around the Park, making the location even more kid friendly.

Some of the Parks even have heated swimming pools and things like bowling alleys, so wet day entertainment is sorted too. This means that Himself can cycle and do activities with the kids, or let them loose cycling together alone and I can relax in the house, cook dinner or whatever I feel up to. There is usually restaurant and a snack bar on site too so we don’t even have to cook if we don’t want to. The secret to an excellent family holiday is “kids happy = parents happy = result!” Each holiday home is different… Let’s take a look at where we stayed (ours is the first house on the left)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Downstairs double, so the only stairs after I took these photographs are the ones to the front door…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One kid has a long room upstairs with a single bed at each end…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The other kid has a double upstairs…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Washbasin area between the two upper rooms…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 5, 2015

From Maastricht to Vaals, Away From The City And Into The Countryside…

We were in Maastricht several years ago and spent the first night and morning in the city itself, but would be spending the rest of our time in a holiday house in a holiday park.  To get there we needed to travel about forty minutes east of Maastricht to the town of Vaals. It’s lovely to be driving on smaller roads through the countryside… and in this photographic post it’s time to hit the road…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sadly The Post Is Going The Same Way As The Telegraph…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

An archive post from several years ago: Family Kiwidutch were on holiday and walking around the old centre of Maastricht.

One building caught my eye from a distance, due to an interesting dome on the top, but as we go close we saw that this was a former post and telegraph office.

Above the post office lettering there are six doves, or maybe carrier pigeons? and below the lettering, by some art deco style details, two more birds, which I think are stylised eagles.

A variation of the royal emblem of The Netherlands stands above the lettering with two lions rampant and another, smaller rampant lion in the shield between the larger two lions.

The smallest lion holds a sheaf of wheat in one hand and a sword in the other and the shield is topped with a large crown. It’s not an emblem I’ve seen before so maybe the Post Office used to have it’s own one, but it seems to be no longer in use. The dome appears to be part of the art-deco decoration and the building looks like it used to be very big so I’m supposing that in times past it was the main post office for the city.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 4, 2015

The Kids Begged To Stop At DeliFrance, We Didn’t Take Much Persuading…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch were in Maastricht several years ago and whilst having a look around the central city, decided that it was time to stop or a spot of lunch.

More accurately the kids decided because we walked past a pastry shop / café called “DeliFrance” that had it’s front window open to the street.

Prominently displayed were waffles, and nothing gets a hungry child’s attention faster then delicious icing-sugar coated junk food like waffles, so having zoomed in faster than a pair of cruise missiles, they stood there pleading that they were so dying of hunger that they couldn’t walk another step, and “oh … look! … the only thing on offer we like, seems to be waffles !

Yes…(“what a shame!”). Himself and I relented, him because he was not eyeing up the waffles, but hankering after the coffee bean and me because all three of them had been patient while I took photographs and I was now rather in need for a sit down rest. Maastricht is a university city and we were in luck, the place was full whilst we ordered but there was a sudden mass exodus as a large group of students vacated in order to get to their lectures on time.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Whilst we were deciding what to order, we noticed that many of the young people sitting at the tables were packing textbooks into backpacks and getting ready to leave.

One of them was a young man who was talking to his friend about where he was supposed to be, the friend corrected him because apparently he had to be somewhere else.

The first guy let out a very loud expletive and exclaimed “But that’s in the (name I don’t remember) building and I should have been there five minutes ago!!!”).

Then he turned and sprinted out of the café, turned left so we saw him run past the open window, with his friend following, picking up things his mate had dropped.

All of the other students burst out laughing, they were obviously still on time for their lectures, but knew that this either had been or would be them one day.

With the tables suddenly vacated we were spoilt for choice and made ourselves comfortable. The children of course ordered waffles, Himself a coffee and me a cola light, my one true vice. Had I known that Little Mr. was destined to eat something with icing-sugar, I never would have pulled out a dark coloured tee-shirt for him to wear that morning… parents with children will know exactly what that means. The kids gave their waffles a ten out of ten. I also got photographs of the stone faces on the building. Refreshed and rested we set out again to look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 3, 2015

Have Horses Shrunk Or Have People Become Giants Since 1786…?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this archive post from our Maastricht holiday some years ago, I noticed that all around the city are little architectural details in the form of plaques, stonework etc.

Once you start looking for them, there are many, many to be found.

For every building I found one on, I estimate that I probably missed at least ten because I didn’t go down so many streets.

A serious walking tour and a ton more time would likely uncover many more of these gems.

It is the usual historical custom in the Netherlands to divide date numbers, with the century on the left hand side of an emblem and the year on the right hand side.

Also, many emblems refer to the original use of the building so a cow may denote a butchery etc but in the photographs below most of them appear to be public houses or inns. Therefore the year for the first photograph here is 1745 and the text says “In the Unicorn” (“eenhoorn” meaning quite literally “een”, “hoorn” = “one”,”horn”). That one is for an Inn.  I do have to admit however that I was stumped when it came to the picture of the horse with four men on it’s back (is that even possible?) my only thought there being: Poor horse! Some other images are a little more hidden, like the face in the second floor corner of a building or the gold ram’s head at the base of three story bay window. I drooled over these… I hope you do too.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 2, 2015

The Artworks Of Maastricht: Well, Some Of Them At Least…

In yesterday’s archive post, Family Kiwidutch saw some people street entertaining / (busking) who were dressed as statues. They had a very well rehearsed way of standing still and looking statue-like and then suddenly moving when an unsuspecting pedestrian passed by. In our instance it was Little Mr. who got the shock of his life, jumping with a startled squeak as the man in silver caught him unawares. Today’s post is about the inanimate statues of central Maastricht, they range from the more modern examples to more conventional ones and there are a few with a bit of humour thrown in as well. I adore this kind of artwork so enjoy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 1, 2015

The Statue Comes Alive And The Jokes On Little Mr…

Filed under: ART,Maastricht,PHOTOGRAPHY,Statues / Sculpture,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

This archive post finds Family Kiwidutch in Maastricht and taking a look around the historic central city. The children are fascinated by two men posing as “living statues” and delighted when the one in the silver outfit first “came alive” startled Little Mr  as we walked past and then responded with a thumbs up when we laughed about it and put some coins into the box at his feet. This kind of street entertainment (busking?) is often found in bigger European cities but we tend to shop locally in our neighbourhood so don’t get to see them so much…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 30, 2015

Sint-Janskerk, The Big Red Tower That Wasn’t Always…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

St. John’s Church is one of the two churches on the Vrijthof in the center of Maastricht. To the right is the St. Servaas Basilica and on the left St. John’s Church. The entrance to the church is under the tower of the Henric Veldekeplein.

The “Sint-Janskerk” (St. John’s Church) originally built as a baptistery for the Chapter of Saint Servatius, and eventually became an independent Parish.

In the middle ages St. John’s was one of the four parish churches in Maastricht. The church takes its name from John the Baptist and was founded in approximately 1200 .

St. John’s Church was named in 1218 for the first time and the present church dates from the late 14th and early 15th century. In 1414, the Gothic baptistry was added.

The original tower collapsed on June 8, 1366 after a violent storm. The current tower was completed after a long renovation in the second half of the fifteenth century and was topped with the construction of the high lantern.

After the conquest of Maastricht in 1632 by Frederick Henry, the church was finally turned earlier to Protestant hands, after having been claimed earlier by the Protestants.

From 1633 the church belonged to the Dutch Reformed Church. The murals with scenes Catholic disappeared under a layer of white lime and only came to light during an early 20th century restoration.

The tower has not always had the distinctive red color; in writings mention is made of the colors yellow (early 18th century) and white (early 19th century). The church has been restored multiple times in the years.

During the last restoration (1984), the tower was again painted red. The church was built in marl stone on a foundation of coal sandstone and limestone. The tower superstructure exhibits influences from Dom Tower in Utrecht. The marl stone crown and spire date from the time of the restorations by Cuypers (1877).

The tower also contains a 15th century wooden belfry with a bell from 1687, cast by John and Josephus Plumere. A small bell, the so-called. Gate bell, formerly chimed daily at the opening and closing of the gates but was stolen by the Germans during the occupation in 1943. In 1997 the tower gained a new clock. Further facilities at the church several sculpted tombs in black and white marble, stone tombstones (the oldest from 1354) and several murals, including Lamb with cross vane in the choir and a representation of Christ as Salvator Mundi on a pedestal.

The church is the venue for regular concerts, including during the annual festival of religious music Musica Sacra. It is also venue for the March international art fair TEFAF, an exhibition of antique books and prints. The church can be visited daily, except on Sundays, then church services are held. In summer it’s possible to climb the almost 80 meter high tower which is the highest in Maastricht.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sint-Janskerk / St John’s Church Maastricht

Next Page »

The Rubric Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 818 other followers