Local Heart, Global Soul

October 14, 2013

Tools and Experience Prove to Produce a Trés Bon-Bon Result…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch are visiting the Chocolate Museum in Brugge (a.k.a. Bruges) in Belgium with our good friend “Velveteen”.

These are the diary pages of our last summer’s travels, as we cram as many places and experiences that we can into every day.  Of course it’s best to leave the very best of the Chocolate Museum until last: what’s a Chocolate museum without  real, edible, delectable chocolate?

As we finish our tour of the place we come to the bit that the kids have been waiting for since the beginning: the bon-bon making demonstration where the visitors get to partake of the results.

I often make my own soft filled chocolates and know that it’s not always as easy as it looks, mind you: having a “trilling” machine at home to make the shells in seconds and remove all of the air bubbles would have made my chocolate making experiences easier too.

The lady doing the demonstration is a master of the art,  it’s totally clear that she does this every day, she has both the machinery and the experience to make it speedy and effortless. Hmm,  a temperature controlled vat to keep the chocolate at perfect temperature needs to go onto my “if I won the lottery” list with the trilling machine too.

We arrive a little while before the demonstration starts so wait and get a spot near the front for our patience.  Once the demonstration is over, the tray of praline bon-bon is passed around the  crowd and so many hands reached forward for a treat that I didn’t have a hope of getting close up photos of the tray.

Himself and I concentrated on scoring a bon-bon each for the kids and everyone was unanimous in their opinion of the goodies… we could easily have polished off an entire tray had we been left to our own devices.

We stop at the museums shop on the way out and the kids score a few more pieces of chocolate from reception by turning on the charm, whilst I spy second hand heavy plastic chocolate moulds on sale and purchase one to take home. I’ve since used it quite a few times and whilst my efforts aren’t  quite as tidy as the professionally made ones, the forms turn out fabulously formed chocolates.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

2 Comments »

  1. Great blog. I do have a remark though: I am Belgian and I can tell you why they do not serve the waffles all day long. It is a typical afternoon treat with a cup of tea or coffee…nothing else. The yeast dough needs to rise for hours, very slowly, if done properly and cannot be kept all day long. Nobody I know ever ate a waffle before the main dish, and not after it. It is like having breakfast at a 3 star restaurant at 9 in the evening. You won’t get a dessert before your meal there either!
    You only get precooked waffles whenever you want…but restaurateurs that respect their products will never serve that. So, it has nothing to do with being unkind or anything: it is just not done as it is impossible to do it right.
    I hope I explaint it to you now? 🙂

    Comment by viviane — February 22, 2015 @ 3:33 pm | Reply

    • Viviane,
      It’s wonderful to hear why the waffles are only served at certain times.

      It was huge frustration for our visitor when we seemed to always be asking for them at the wrong time, when she had come so far, had limited time in Belgium and had had dreamed of eating a waffle in Belgium even before she arrived in Europe.
      I’m also delighted to hear about the waffle making process, it’s impressive when you know what goes into making them! Thank You so much for explaining it 🙂

      Comment by kiwidutch — February 22, 2015 @ 11:58 pm | Reply


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