Local Heart, Global Soul

November 19, 2013

From Burelles to Hary, The Search For Fortifications Continues…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page of my last summer’s diary as I document our  European adventures with visiting Singaporean friend “Velveteen”.

We have just discovered the route of Fortified Churches, particular to this area of the L’Aisne, France, and are taking time out to visit just a few of them.

The next Fortified Church  we find is the parish church called Saint-Martin,  in the village of Burelles. My research (links below) tells me:

The Church has a Latin cross reverse, leading directly onto the transept porch plan. The fortified portion is brick. The tower-porch, served by a staircase half off work, is on 3 levels. The first two are vaulted with warheads.    

The external elevations are decorated with motifs in glazed brick: six hearts, two cross-bearers, three diamonds, two knot, one cross and probably one cup.Probably built on the foundations of the first medieval church of which there remains no trace, the choir of the Church of Burelles was built in the middle of the 16th century.

The other part of the Church (nave, transept and porch) corresponds to the fortified part.  The sacristy was rebuilt in 1874 by Benard architect in neo-Renaissance style. The Dungeon vaults are included after the first world war and part of the Bell Tower was rebuilt in 1926. The Church is listed as historical monuments in 1927 and in 1931. 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

From Burelles we make our way to the Fortified parish Church called “Saint-Corneille And Saint-Cyprien” in the small village of Hary.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The village labelled as “A” is supposed to be marked as Gronard, but I didn’t know how to add words to the screenshot…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As with the Burelles text from the same source, I strongly suspect that the English version of the information I found is probably a rather dodgy machine translation of a French text that  we were unable to locate. This a  big pity because had we had access to the original we could have had a good go at making  a rather better translation, since not only have both Himself and I studied French but we also have plenty of native speaker French friends.

The choir, the transept and the nave are built in the Middle ages. The choir and the transept are vaulted a vault of warheads and covered with a roof in two pans and pinion covered ending hipped polygonal above the apse. The nave, which is lower than the choir, is covered with a roof long sided with the sacristy. It is vaulted to a false Vault. The North wall shows four arches arches once contacting the aisle.

The fortified western section is brick. The porch is covered with a canopy of warheads.  Glazed brick motifs come decorate the elevations of the tower-porch and turret: four diamonds, one cross, four cores. The choir, the transept and the nave of the Church by Handa  date from the late 12th or early 13th century. However only the apse has retained its original appearance.

The nave was greatly remodelled probably in the 17th century (deletion of the bays of the southern wall, north aisle). The fortified Western  portal was built in 1619 as it is demonstrated by the date shown on the key of the porch and the coat of arms engraved on the Western Portal.

 Following the collapse of the ceiling of the transept crossing in 1989, the whole of the building was restored in 1993

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now it’s back into the van and through the village as we look to discover the next one…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Source: Ministry of Culture, France
http://en.patrimoine-de-france.com/aisne/burelles/eglise-paroissiale-fortifiee-saint-martin-7.php
http://en.patrimoine-de-france.com/aisne/hary/eglise-paroissiale-fortifiee-saint-corneille-et-saint-cyprien-9.php

1 Comment »

  1. I never heard of a fortified church. This is absolutely fascinating. I assume the “windows” were always bricked? What are dungeon vaults? I love these images too. Thank you for the introduction to this concept. Amazing! 🙂

    Comment by George Weaver — November 19, 2013 @ 5:35 am | Reply


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