Local Heart, Global Soul

February 5, 2014

The Strange Mixture Of The Real and Surreal…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m busy documenting our travels and adventures of the summer of  2012 with visiting Singaporean friend “Velvetine”. We have already seen little snippets of England, Belgium, France, Luxembourg  and Germany, and now we are back in The Netherlands checking out the M.C. Escher Museum in The Hague.

One of the information boards inside the museum tells me:

Escher played mysterious games with mirrors and mirror images. He exploited reflections in various ways, including a large number of self portraits, which always involve the use of a mirror.

Escher’s first such work was made in 1917 when he was 19 years  old. He often worked with a convex mirror. the distortion produced by the mirror creates a broad view of the surrounding. Intriguingly, the space behind the artist is revealed.

In “Three Spheres” Escher used reflection to represent various materials with great accuracy. (This is a traditional element in Dutch art, one in which seventeenth-century artists excelled.

As a graphic artist, Escher did the same with in a lithograph) the central silver sphere reflects Escher Escher and the room: the glass sphere mainly reflect the windows in the wall at the side: the stone sphere doesn’t reflect any image at all. All three are reflected in different ways in the table top.

In “Rippled Surface, Dewdrop and Puddle” a second look reveals that the reflections are natural. The surroundings are not directly visible: the reflection of the tree branches in “Rippled Surface” for example are only distorted by in the ripples in the water. Escher entices the viewer into perceiving and impossible situation as a reality. Often a closer look is needed to realise that what you see can not be real.

Escher was constantly imagining new combinations t take the viewer by surprise. He wanted to “draw attention to something that is impossible”. he said, while working on a commission in 1960, that in order to achieve this “there has to be a degree of mystery, but one that wasn’t immediately apparent”. He even spoke of “trickery” where two sight lines would be combined in one work.

Around Queen regent Emma’s winter Palace there are many similar themes: the arrangement of old and new, modern art in the courtyard garden and historical decorative plasterwork on the palace ceilings and around fireplaces,  Escher’s work’s where you look and know you are being fooled but are uncertain just how. There’s a juxtaposition of art and aesthetics in the Palace that I find truly fascinating. Together: ornate glass windows and mind bending art… rock on!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

1 Comment »

  1. Reblogged this on O LADO ESCURO DA LUA.

    Comment by anisioluiz2008 — February 5, 2014 @ 1:12 am | Reply


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