Local Heart, Global Soul

March 7, 2014

Now Let’s Wiggle Those Tail Feathers!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Patterns are funny things,  either natural or man made: some you love, some you hate and some just for better or for worse amaze.

Things in nature often have patterns that are beautiful in their detail and colour, such as the brilliant greens and blues in a peacock’s plumage, the patterns in leaves and trees, the markings in rock and stone.

Here in Zaans Schans there is an area of polder called the Klaverpolder ,  “klaver” translates as “clover” and an information board gives at least as good a definition of “polder” as I can:

This polder (an area of reclaimed land) is a typical example of the soft boggy pasture land of the region: long narrow parcels of low-lying land surrounded by drainage channels. The water in the (this) polder, now a nature reserve, is regulated by watermills.”

This is the area of the museum where the working farm buildings have been placed together, there is also a small working farm and “childrens’ zoo” where sheep, goats, chickens, ducks etc  can be seen at close quarters, and the workings of a farm explained.  The cow  in the farmyard is however made of fibreglass and fitted with rubber teats so that children can try out their milking skills, something that Little Mr. found was harder to do than it first looked.

Feeding the chickens and the goats made us some firm friends (for as long as the food supply lasted) and got me up close to some chickens who’s plumage was a work of art not only in the way only covered the birds body but also in the shape and colour of the patterns it made whilst doing so. Even the chicken that looked from afar like it was plain black in colour, revealed itself to be a range of beautiful mottled shades of browns and black at close range.

I attempt to get close and study the complex and beautiful arrangement of feathers,  Mother Nature is most certainly without doubt a genius pattern designer, both in form and function. The children are quick to explore the  farmyard and to take the opportunity to run around and burn off some energy, the sun is now out and more people are suddenly also out and about around us.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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