Local Heart, Global Soul

April 1, 2014

Chicken Roulade: Quick Prep, Slow Cook, Divine Result….

Filed under: Dutch Cuisine,FOOD,PHOTOGRAPHY,Recipes,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I scored this recipe from a fellow foodie friend after a dinner out at their place over a year ago.

Since then I have made this recipe fairly regularly and have even tweaked the original recipe in a way that I think makes it even better.

The recipe in question is a “roulade” and the name comes from “rouler” (French for “to roll”) and in the Netherlands at least,  consists of  raw meat tightly rolled up and encased in a net of butchers string.

The meat is slow cooked, lifted out to cool, very finely sliced and a jus (gravy) made from the resulting stock.

The cooked roulade meat is then served in the gravy.

I know that roulardes come in pork meat and in chicken, this recipe is for the chicken version.

What I like most is that there is minimal work needed for maximum flavour, the slow cooking is the secret and who doesn’t like an easy recipe?

Don’t worry at all about this recipe being to “mustard-y”, even if you use a really strong mustard the resulting meat will have a lovely full flavour but rather surprisingly not at all be of overpowering  mustard. In fact, I never would have believed how much mustard this was made in had I not made it myself. The onion and chicken seem to balance things out perfectly. If cooking this recipe in bulk don’t be afraid to add as much garlic as you like and also some extra onion, as you will see later in the recipe, I use it all in the end anyway so nothing is wasted and the flavour just gets better and better. Since this meat is slow cooked, I usually cram my le crueset pan as full as I can manage and then later when the recipe is finished, freeze the rest of the meat for easy meals at a later date.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I haven’t yet tried to make this in my crock-pot / slow cooker, simply because it’s so easy to make on the stove top: prepare and leave for hours to simmer.

The only hassle is that sometimes the supermarket only has three roulades on their shelves, when I really would have liked there to have been five so that I could fill the pan up. I took the step-by-step photographs over various cooking sessions.

Ingredients:

1 chicken roularde (already prepared and tied up in butchers netting)

2 large onions

3-6 large cloves garlic (depending on how much you like garlic)

100 grams  (3.5 oz) butter

2-3 bayleaves

1/2 of a 350 gram / 12 oz jar coarse mustard

water

Method:

Chop your onions and garlic…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

With a spoon or a spatula, coat the roulade as evenly as you can with the mustard.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Melt the butter on a low heat in a heavy based cooking pan, then place the roulade into the pan and gently brown it on all sides.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Add the onions, garlic, bay leaves and enough water to cover. (The roulade will want to float so I often place a soup plate on top of them to keep them better immersed in the liquid)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Cook on a very low heat (the water should be just moving) for 3 to 3 1/2 hours depending on the thickness of the roulade.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Remove the meat from the liquid, be careful because the meat is soft and the roulade can break apart at this point (even inside the string net). Whilst the meat is still hot, use tongs and scissors to gently cut the net away from the meat. (doing this whilst the meat is hot can be a little tricky but if you wait until the meat has cooled then the net will stick to the meat and tear chunks of it away when you try and remove it). Try not to break the roulade as you take the net off. Leave the meat to cool completely before cutting it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Take the cooled roulade and using either a very sharp knife or a cutting machine, cut as thin slices as you can manage. (my cutting machine setting made slices 1-2 mm thick).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

At this point in the original recipe my friend usually makes a packet mix of vegetable gravy and adds the meat to it to serve, my own addition to this recipe is as follows: Making sure to keep all of the liquid, Sieve the mustard/onion  and bay leaf from the water,  discard the bay leaf, and using a stick blender, blend the mustard and onion pulp so that it becomes a paste. Add some flour to this paste to thicken the gravy, cook it on a low heat and then add several cups of the liquid that the roulade cooked in for added flavour.

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Bag and freeze any bulk cooked chicken (with or without the gravy as preferred)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This recipe is divine with mashed potato, and I’ve mixed the chicken sans gravy into stir fry and pasta dishes. Yum!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

2 Comments »

  1. Sounds delicious! Wow, look at all that spinach, you are healthy!

    Comment by Brenda — April 1, 2014 @ 1:10 am | Reply

  2. Looks most excellent! 😀

    Comment by Carrie — April 1, 2014 @ 11:06 pm | Reply


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