Local Heart, Global Soul

June 25, 2014

Hay Hay! I’ve Found A Little Gem Of Dutch Engineering…

Filed under: Delftland,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Our family and friends 2012 camping and picnic long weekend in the Delftlands farm of  ” Hoeve Bouwlust”  is a brilliant idea that gets our families and kids out of the city and offers a taste of fresh air and rural experiences.

For me it also offered the chance to get out of the four walls of home since my foot injury restricts my mobility and keeps me housebound for much of the time.

I’m just out visiting for a few hours because tent accommodation and crutches are not a good mix, but since it’s a half hour drive from home it at least means I don’t miss out completely.

One things I have been trying to photograph for years now is the typical Dutch haystack, because it has such a unique form and is so very different to hay storage I know so well in New Zealand.

To date my efforts have been fleeting glimpses as seen from highways and from our moving car… and haystacks are often placed within a cluster of other outbuildings so  clear photograph has been difficult until now. Space is (comparatively) cheap in New Zealand so hay there is stored in massive sprawling sheds, often three sided and several stories high.Space is at a premium in The Netherlands and even haystacks need to incorporate space saving ideas. This has resulted in what I think is an ingenious design:  usually four (but sometimes thee or five or six) very tall stout posts that hold up a four sided roof that is secured to the posts by large rings.

The roof can be raised or lowered depending on how much hay in is the stack, and the roof is always kept close to the top of the hay to protect it from the rain and wind. Add more hay and you simply raise the roof, as the hay gets used the roof comes down.

I find the design simple, ergonomic, beautiful, logical and a perfect solution for keeping hay out of the elements no matter how much hay you have. At the  Hoeve Bouwlust farm it was near the end of summer and the winter hay had not yet been stocked so the haystack roof was fairly low. Now at last I finally had some decent photographs to show off what I consider a little gem of Dutch engineering.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another one on the same farm had a five post arrangement… and a few extra walls since clearly the campers were not wanted inside it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another one I photographed from the car had the four sided arrangement…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

2 Comments »

  1. Very clever!

    Comment by Carrie — June 28, 2014 @ 10:34 pm | Reply

  2. Very cool!

    Comment by Brenda Davis Harsham — April 6, 2015 @ 11:08 pm | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: