Local Heart, Global Soul

February 22, 2015

Oops There’s A Hole In The Roof…And A Scary Escalator…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In this archive post Family Kiwidutch are in the German city of Frankfurt and now visiting one of the cities iconic buildings: “MyZeil”.

MyZeil is a shopping centre complex in the centre of Frankfurt, designed by Roman architect Massimiliano Fuksas as part of the PalaisQuartier development. It’s main entrance on the Zeil, Frankfurt’s main shopping street. It was officially opened on 26 February 2009.

We enter by  a 45 meter escalator that is one of the longest in Germany that takes us directly to the fourth floor of the building.

I’m not sure if the escalator is steep or if it just seems that way because it’s so long and I’m on crutches but Himself helps me on and stands behind me so that I feel safer. I get some photographs from the top, looking down.

I find out some more information:

“Architectural highlight of the future Mall and Entertainment Center in the city centre of Frankfurt is its amorphous roof landscape which reminds of the formative conception of a Canyon. It covers the complete building complex.

The triangular structure of the roof penetrates the building inside, through light openings, and forms itself finally in the ground floor as a well-lit tunnel.

Inside fluid shaped spaces offer interesting view relations at all levels of the building. The daylight penetrates into the lower floors and creates a daylight-lit ambience. The fully glazed main facade continues the organically formed steel-glass roof and allows the pedestrians a view through the building into the sky by an inward trumpet formed deformation.

A 45m long express-escalator connects the street level directly with  a Piazza in the 4th floor containing catering and the accesses to the areas of Fitness, Wellness and Kidsworld above.The basic idea of the shopping mall is to create a vertical city by physical and visual connections inside the building, an urban shooping street with a new element – verticality.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Inside we find that the inside architecture is even more amazing than the outside… it’s mind-boggling that it was even possible to build this and the photographs don’t do it justice.

A comment on the TripAdvisor website also mentions:

“The use of toilet is free of cost in this mall. Also you can utilize the free WIFI access while you are in their garden area in the ground floor.

Besides, they also have facility to recharge your mobile device (30 min) in a locker, while you can stroll around and collect them afterwards.”

Address Zeil 106, 60313 Frankfurt am Main
Total area (GEA) 77,000 m2
Levels Eight levels, more than 100 shops

Special feature:  The longest interior suspended escalator in Germany with 45 m Expressway,

from the Ground Floor up to the 4th floor in ca. 120 seconds.

Entrances from Zeil 106 and Thurn-und-Taxis-Platz 4  //  Basement car park Entrance on Grosse Eschenheimer Strasse.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Escalator heading upwards…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Escalator views looking down…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The  escalator hangs in the space and disappears into the depths…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Views from even higher…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A four story  escalator is not for those who don’t have a head for heights… the levels drop away below us…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The roof becomes like the top of a funnel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and disappears down like a stream of water…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Going down in the lift, the glass doors show the building off all the way down…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A Café viewing terrace…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

One of the views from the window…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Hmmm, We keep seeing this helicopter…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.architonic.com/aisht/myzeil-shopping-mall-part-of-the-palaisquartier-fuksas/5100026

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Attraction_Review-g187337-d2202504-Reviews-MyZeil-Frankfurt_Hesse.html

4 Comments »

  1. Thanks for the photos of a rather remarkable building! Frankfurt is stuffed with interesting architecture.

    Comment by Animalcouriers — February 22, 2015 @ 8:59 am | Reply

  2. Very interesting building! I have been on a really really long escalator before down into/up out of a subway system. I’m thinking it was in Prague? It seemed to take forever, that’s for sure!

    Comment by Carrie — February 28, 2015 @ 8:25 pm | Reply

    • Adding that I searched online for ‘Prague subway escalators’ and it seems they are indeed very long there (supposedly the longest in Europe is in Prague, at 100 meters long! Though I don’t think I was on that one, in general it seems the escalators in the Prague subway are quite long!)

      Comment by Carrie — February 28, 2015 @ 8:34 pm | Reply

      • Scratch that 100 m – seems to be “only” 87 m… That’ll teach me to believe the first thing I read! lol Still! 87 meters!

        “Because of the soil characteristics [in Prague] the underground channels had to be dug quite deep so, as a result the escalators leading to the metro platforms are quite huge.”

        Comment by Carrie — February 28, 2015 @ 8:38 pm | Reply


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