Local Heart, Global Soul

May 3, 2016

Stained Glass That Illuminates The Arts And Trades…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I am visiting the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam with two friends.

Since we arrived at opening time on a Sunday we decided that it would be a wise idea to go and see the “Nightwatch” straight away before the bus tours and crowds rolled in and made viewing difficult.

We head towards the wing where the painting is and come to two stunning stained glass windows.

I take photographs,  but being at wheelchair height has distinct disadvantages.

My friends are keen to enjoy the views around us but also eager to see the “Night watch”.

The window has a theme of the Arts, and also some of the trades with some of the panels are labelled “werktuigkundige” (a mechanic / technician holding a large cog in one hand and a compass in the other.) , “visscher” (a fisherman holding two large fish in one hand and a net and pole in the other), and “boer” (a farmer holding  a sheaf of wheat in one hand and a spade in the other).

There are also panels depicting men holding artists equipment and the names of Dutch painters:  “Lucas van Leyden” (1494 – 1533,  skilled in the arts of woodcut, etching, engravings, draughtsmanship and painting.

“Willem van Heerle” (15th century engraver and painter), “Apelles.” (4th century BC,  a renowned painter of ancient Greece) and “Rembrandt” (Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn , 1606 -1669,  painter, etcher and draftsman).

Above each of the painters are panels depicting the making of stained glass, painting at an easel, fresco paining and illuminating manuscripts.

There are lovely flower and grape with grape vines frames around the large panels, the sides and the naming panels at the bottom, I get a few close up photographs of those at least.

Even if I were able to stand up, these windows could not be done justice without me bringing a far better zoom lens and a tripod.

This is yet another thing on my “to-do” list, there is detail here yet to be seen, I aim to find it one day in the future.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

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