Local Heart, Global Soul

June 5, 2016

I Want To Fill That Pouch With Fish !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There is no denying that there is a lot of variety in the Rijksmuseum.

In one area kind-of between the galleries stands a statue. It immediately grabs my attention for it’s composition, it’s simplicity, and the scene that it reflects.

The piece is called:  “Two Mothers” Terracotta 1893 by Frans Stracké (1829-1898)
This sweet scene reflects an increasing interest in the lives of fishermen.

The statue shows a young woman holding her child, with her dog’s puppies gathered in her apron. Yet life is not a bed of roses for this barefoot fisherman’s wife. She has only two fish in her pouch, and the net that she drags behind her is empty

From Wikipedia I learn: “Francis Xavier ” French or Franz” Stracké sr ( born Dorsten, May 5, 1820 – Baarn , died March 26 1898) was a Dutch sculptor of German origin . The son of John Ignatius Stracké , a German painter and sculptor who settled in Arnhem.

He had two older brothers who were also sculptors. French Stracké took lessons in sculpture of his father, when they still had their studio in Berlin and once in Arnhem he became especially associated religious images . From 1852 to 1870 he was  sculpting teacher at the Arnhem Teeken- and Architectural Society practice of art .

The illustrator Alexander Ver Huell ordered him a commission to sculpt the family mausoleum and through this same benefactor Stracké was appointed professor in 1868 at the Amsterdam State Academy of Fine Arts where he remained until 1889 .  He should not be confused with his son Frans jr. And French ( Francis Leonard ) Stracké , the son of his brother Jean Theodore Stracké .
I ended up taking a lot of photographs because the way the light fell on the piece, the depiction of the fabric, the expression on the lady’s face, the texture of the fishing net, it all fascinated me.  A little reading up on the piece tells me that the hole in the back of her scarf is one of the vent holes necessary for the baking of the clay.

I’m also adding it to my reference file for drawing, maybe, one day in the future. This statue provokes feelings too, I have read about the harsh life poor fisherfolk like her had, I felt like I wanted to give her shoes, a warm coat, something for her baby … but, most of all I wanted to help make her day a better one and fill her pouch to overflowing with fish.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

Wikipedia: Frans Stracké  (Dutch language only)

6 Comments »

  1. This is really my one of the favorite gallery in the world! 🙂 I also like the “Golden Age” time and here is the right place for admiring this unique art works. Bye. Kamila

    Comment by Kamila Pala — June 7, 2016 @ 2:42 pm | Reply

    • Kamila Pala,

      Delighted to find another “Golden Age” enthusiast to add to the club! Of course like any time and place life was decidedly better if you were wealthy and had status, rather than being in poverty and very low in the social order.
      The riches of this time in the Netherlands, were of course on a scale that is almost beyond comprehension which is why so many treasures were commissioned and why so many still remain.

      Some of the things I see here, I seriously wonder I they could be replicated today, even with modern technology, globally we have lost many artisan skills that used to be built up in someone’s lifetime, taught to family members, handed down through generations. Of course pockets remain, but people these days seem more preoccupied with the “cheap, quick and instant” rather being prepared to pay the required money for items that take a lot of time and effort to produce.
      I’d rather save for ten years of an item of beauty than buy cheap tat ten times over. I actually did this with a large stained glass window and have not regretted it for a nanosecond!
      Once In a Lifetime You Should Take The Plunge…

      Thank your for visiting! 🙂

      Comment by kiwidutch — June 8, 2016 @ 1:01 pm | Reply

  2. I am guessing you found my site and my Anti-Social Media poem because I had found yours already. I am a descendant of Frans Stracke (and subsequently the artists/theologians the Arendzens) and so was fascinated in this post. A lot of my family have been looking at it. Lovely to find this and wonderful insights and pictures. Thank you!

    Comment by sophierharrington — October 18, 2017 @ 9:41 pm | Reply

    • sophierharrington,
      Yes Sophie, your Anti-social media poem really resonated. It’s excellent that you found this post and that being a descendant of Frans Stracke, that it brings you special pleasure. I don’t know if you live local to Amsterdam or not but I hope that in providing photographs and some information about this stunning work, that I help to celebrate the legacy that Frans Stracke has left for us to enjoy.

      Comment by kiwidutch — October 19, 2017 @ 8:32 pm | Reply

      • Absolutely. Very enlightening and appreciate you keeping Frans Stracke’s legacy alive. No, we’re British and live near London. I hope to visit Amsterdam one day. Thanks again.

        Comment by sophierharrington — October 19, 2017 @ 8:49 pm | Reply

        • sophierharrington,
          You are more than welcome!

          Comment by kiwidutch — October 22, 2017 @ 8:48 am | Reply


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