Local Heart, Global Soul

June 18, 2016

Erm, Err… Are YOU Looking At Me?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Coming to the end of this tour of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, I find different paintings interesting for different reasons.

The main reason something catches my eye is of course that there is a high level of detail in a painting,  or the fine rendering of marble to produce mind-bendingly realistic forms.

In some paintings of cloth and clothing, the skill of the artists leaves the viewer in awe, in other painting the subject of the portrait stares directly out at the viewer in a mixture of confidence, defiance and curiosity,  so you almost get the feeling that you need to apologise to them for staring.

Here I have rounded up a few of the last photographs taken from various galleries,  Let’s take a look…

The Music Lesson“, Oil on panel, 1808 by Louis Moritz (1773-1850)
Like “The Drawing Lesson” (by the same artist) “The Music Lesson” is set in an interior with a view through to another space. Above the door is  marble relief of the Greek god Apollo playing his lyre. The two women are practicing a duet for guitar and voice under the direction of their music teacher. According to tradition, the painter himself served as the model for the teacher.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Tomb of Michiel de Ruyter in the Nieuwe Kerk,  Amsterdam” Oil on canvas 1683, Emanuel de Witte (1617-1692)
‘Visitors are admiring Admiral de Ruyter’s imposing tomb monument. It occupies the place where the main altar once stood when the Nieuwe Kerk was still a Catholic church. Monumental marble tomb is a tribute to the naval hero, who died in 1676 off the coast of Sicily at the age of 69. It was designed by the sculptor Rombout Verhulst. De Ruyter’s son commissioned this painting.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

2 Comments »

  1. I especially like the lady in black. The painter has really caught her inner soul in that picture. I love it when they do that.

    Comment by sarsm — June 20, 2016 @ 10:16 am | Reply

    • sarsm,

      So true! There have been quite a few portraits during my tour today where you can see not just the image of a face but also the character of the person in it, some are funny, some are sombre, so are startling as they almost seem to stare you down.
      The clothes they wear also give an idea as to the kind of person they were: Over the top finery may point to vanity, others like this calm, confident lady in black, tells me that she was probably a very practical, down to earth Dutch Calvinist …
      …(She may not be, of course), but there is no ostentatiousness on display here, she looks like someone in touch with the hard reality of the real world … like she knows exactly the price of a loaf of bread and is a kind hearted person who i personally involved in the day to day running of her household.

      Comment by kiwidutch — June 21, 2016 @ 4:20 pm | Reply


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