Local Heart, Global Soul

August 21, 2016

Clearly More About Action Packed Drama Than About History Lessons…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Taking a look around the Burg Satvey Castle in Mechernich, Germany, reveals many surprises.

Slightly to the left of the castle I find a jousting ring!

Apparently special shows are put on at the castle every summer complete with medieval tournaments and entertainment.

On the side closest to me are spectator stands of the specific type called “tribunes” (pronounced “trib-bune-nurs)” and for which I can not think of the English equivalent at the moment.

They have been dismantled insofar as usually there would be long, heavy planks over these metal platforms, giving cheap but practical viewing options when catering to larger crowds of people.

On the day I visited the seating planks were missing, but in the centre there is a central platform, half way up from which I was able to snap a few shots. I use the zoom lens to peer under the canopied stalls on the other side of the paddock, from what I can make out they too are filled with tribunes.

On the castle’s website there are many photographs of medieval festivals in full swing, with crowds of people and lots of action taking place so clearly it’s a far bigger event (or series of events) than I first thought it to be. It’s an interesting thought that in the 21st Century there are still more or less permanent jousting rings set up, but this one is definitely more about action packed drama and choreographed theatre than about history lessons.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

2 Comments »

  1. Not sure if you would have a different word but in the US we usually call that type of seating ‘bleachers’ 🙂

    I have a feeling this exists the same in some other states in USA, but in Harveysburg, Ohio there is a whole walled “town” covering 30 acres that was built especially for the Ohio Renaissance Festival – an event which only happens a couple months out of the year (Sept & Oct), and only on weekends during those two months! (It also includes a jousting arena 🙂 )

    Comment by Carrie — August 28, 2016 @ 6:22 pm | Reply

    • Carrie…

      A new word that I have just learned… “bleachers” … it sounds strange (ok, probably only when I say it lol!)

      How cool is it that there is somewhere that is so big, this is especially made for a medieval festival! I do wonder though, how do you make it economic if it is open for such a limited time? Surely you would need tens of thousands of people through the door to make it break even? Then again, if it became a well known yearly event…. and a local tourist attraction?

      I know from TV programmes here that there are many re-enactments of actual Civil War battles in the USA, and that these are really popular, but didn’t know of any medieval festivals or jousting re-enactments.

      In Europe it’s bit “easier” of course, with the ones we have been to so far having real castles or seriously old city streets and Squares as their backdrops !

      Comment by kiwidutch — August 28, 2016 @ 7:20 pm | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: