Local Heart, Global Soul

December 18, 2016

“Rarely Seen”, So Many To Choose…

In this, the last installment of Museon’s National Geographic exhibition “Rarely Seen”, I have collated a few of the images I found to be most memorable.  Of course I could fit more of the origional photographs in if I had resisted the urge to take additional close-up images of the photographs, but you know mw I could not resist. the level of detail in some of the images just begged for a deeper look,  in fact, in some of the images you could look over and over again and ever time find something new to amaze you. That’s what tells you that these are National Geographic worthy, and why my “point and shoot” efforts never will be. Still, it doesn’t mean that I can not appreciate these photographs,  in fact I think it makes me appreciate them even more. One thing is for certain, my second-hand reproduction of these is a poor relation when compared to standing looking at the real thing. If this exhibition ever comes somewhere near to where you live, I would througherly recommend a visit.  They were on display here between 21 April and 28 August 2016 and may have run their course here in The Hague, but these will always be inspirational. One final time, the same note as before: the artists name is in bold type, the text came with the exhibition.
ICE CAVE.
Ian Plant, Wisconsin.
A ceiling of icicles frames the intrepid photographer on the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin. Known as the Jewels of Lake Superior, during the winter, needles of ice hang from the sea cave ceilings. The widespread caves along the lakeshore form as freezing and thawing conditions and wave action shape the sandstone of the Devils Island Formation.

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

ICE FORMATIONS.
Chip Phillips, Canadian Rockies.
Winter’s dance with the cold can be seen in cracks stretching towards the horizon on a lake in Canada’s Rocky Mountains. Repeated freezing and thawing create striking geometric patterns on the surface ice.

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

PURPLE HAZE.
Guy Tal, Utah.
A rare carpet of purple flowers spreads towards a distant butte. Every few years, when winter snow and spring warmth create the ideal conditions, this stretch of the Mojave Desert bursts into colour with bee plant and scorpion weed. The view is best enjoyed from a distance — bee plant has an unpleasant odour and scorpion weed is named for its bite, which can cause a reaction similar to poison ivy.

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

THE NORTHERN LIGHTS.
Marc Adamus, Canada.
The green glow of an aurora reflects off a frozen lakeshore in Canada’s Yukon Territory. In this composite image, the aurora shows off one of its most common colours. Electrically charged particles from the sun enter our atmosphere and interact with gases above the magnetic poles to form these rippling curtains of lights.

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

FROZEN ICE.
Glenn Nagel, Michigan.
A full moon stands guard over the St. Joseph North Pier Lighthouse in Saint Joseph, Michigan. Crashing waves against the pier during the cold winter of 2013 built up layers of ice and created a frozen dreamscape on the shore of Lake Michigan.

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

ROOM WITH A VIEW.
Manuel Paz-Castanal, Spain.
From across the street, a photographer captures visitors at the opening of a photography exhibit in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, enjoying some fresh air along with the art works. The city, a pilgrimage site in northwest Spain, is known for its beautiful old centre.

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

SPLASH.
Aytul Akbas, Turkey.
A brewing storm sends waves splashing over a retaining wall in Kocaeli Province, Turkey. As the winds picked up, a passer-by’s rainbow umbrella turned inside out.

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

NEBRA SKY DISK.
Kenneth Garrett
The setting sun reflects off this sky disk in central Germany. Buried on the Mittelberg hill near the town of Nebra in 1600 B.C., the disk tracks the sun’s movement along the horizon. It’s the oldest known depiction of the cosmos and may have served as an agricultural and spiritual calendar.

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

RAYONG DAM.
Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal, Thailand.
Fishermen look like just a drop in the water standing inside the overflow spillway of the Khlong Yai Reservoir in Rayong, southern Thailand. This dam provides the region with inexpensive electrical power.

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

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