Local Heart, Global Soul

February 8, 2017

Out From Below The Depths, …And It’s Not Yellow!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Den Helder is the small port city in the far north of the province North Holland that also contains the ferry terminal to the nearby island of Texel.

At the beginning of the 2016 Easter weekend, Family Kiwidutch were in the town, about to board the ferry.

Before you reach the terminal however, there is an unexpected object nestled between nearby buildings: a submarine!

It’s far bigger than we all thought it would be, everyone in the car exclaimed out loud at it’s discovery… that it stands big and hulking, a glimpse of something that we usually only see in books, TV, movies or the News.

None of us have ever seen a submarine like this up close (I am not counting the small yellow glass bottomed tourist boat we went on whilst on holiday in Cape Verde because that was a tiny pleasure craft: what we are seeing here is the real thing). It’s an eye opener, and according to the billboard close by tells us that it’s open to the public.

It’s discoveries like this that make having a camera on hand an excellent idea. These photographs are a compilation of ones taken on the away and return journeys, in order to try and get photographs from as many angles as possible. I manage to get photographs as we go past it simply because traffic has suddenly reduced to a crawl, it seems that after a fairly straightforward trip up here, we are in a traffic jam right within sight of the ferry…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

4 Comments »

  1. Wow! It’s really huge!!

    Comment by sarsm — February 8, 2017 @ 1:16 am | Reply

    • Sarsm, Yes, we were all like… woooooooow! Look at THAT !!! Even the kids were seriously impressed.

      Comment by kiwidutch — February 8, 2017 @ 7:35 pm | Reply

  2. This is the submarine “Tonijn”.
    One of the three historic ships on display at the marinemuseum (http://www.marinemuseum.nl/ in dutch).
    You can visit this ships, I did.
    Glad I didn’t spend my military time at a submarine, hard to believe that a rather large number of sailors had to live in such limited space.

    Comment by Reservebelg — February 17, 2017 @ 6:46 pm | Reply

    • Reservebelg,

      Thank you so much for the link, I checked it out and after seeing the sleeping quarters decided that qualities needed for submarine service must read something like: Must not suffer even an ounce of claustrophobia, able to sleep in cramped spaces, sleep in spite of presence of snoring men, to be of lean build to fit in and around machinery, not be afraid of the dark, extrude strong body odor or be prone to flatulence, require large amount of personal space, must be fastidious tidy…or just to be able to put up with an awful lot!

      I don’t consider myself to be particularly claustrophobic but the pictures of the crowded sleeping arrangements already put me off! I have a new found respect for sub mariners… add war time issues to their list of work duties and you have probably the most terrible job in the most frightening of places.

      Comment by kiwidutch — March 7, 2017 @ 8:20 pm | Reply


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