Local Heart, Global Soul

June 12, 2017

Crisp Edges, Unwavering Edges…

The Garderen Sand Sculpture festival always runs a competition section where the public can try and guess the answers provided by the sand sculpture clues. In 2016 the theme was “Dutch sayings” so I enlisted Himself as a Dutch native speaker to see if we could solve as many of them as possible.

A couple of them were instantly recognisable, others, like the monkey in the sleeve, had me laughing  (and scratching my head) as I wondered how on earth someone came up with this one because it seems to make no sense. I must say that many of these have intricate sculptural work and I often have to pinch myself to remember that these have been sculpted in sand. For instance, how they achieved the crisp edges and smooth unwavering curves within the “Dubbeltje” (ten cent piece) of sculpture Number twenty-nine is beyond me. The two men in No. 30 are beautiful examples of sculpture, sand or otherwise.

(26) This shows an elephant surrounded by plates: “een olifant in een porceleinkast” Literally: an elephant in a china shop which of course translates into the English language saying ” a bull in a china shop”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(27) A man shoveling dirt into a well over a dead calf: “als het kalf verdronken is, dempt men de put“, Literally means ” once the calf has drowned,  it is too late to fill up the well,  which talks about taking measures after it is too late. I think the closest English language equivalent would maybe be = ” it’s too late closing the stable door after the horse has bolted”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(28) The sight of a monkey looking out from inside a shirt sleeve had me giggling even when I had no clue what the saying was. Apparently it’s “de aap komt uit de mouw” which literally translates  “as the monkey comes out of the sleeve” and the meaning behind it is that ” the truth is revealed”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

 

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(29) A ten cent piece from the era of the guilden = “als je voor een dubbeltje geboren bent, wordt je nooit een kwartje” Literally: if you were born a doubeltje (10 cent piece) then you will never be a kwartje (25 cent piece / quarter). Himself tells me that this very much a historical saying = ” if you are born poor you will always stay poor / remain in your class / that you can not rise above your station.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(30) Here we see two very impressive figures in naval uniforms :  “de beste stuurlui staan aan wal” the best mate  ( meaning the person who steers a ship) are ashore and the meaning is that spectators know best how to do a job / it’s about back-seat drivers ones who are quick to critise but never actually do the job themselves.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(31) This one of course has exactly the same saying in English , so “krokodillentranen huilen“, which literally means “crocodile tears crying” means to cry crocodile tears.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(32) man swatting a fly, suddenly I realise there are two flies so this must be: “twee vliegen in een klap“, Literally “two flies in one hit” which I think may be the equivalent saying in English ” to kill two birds with one stone”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Garderen Sand Sculpture Festival

 

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