Local Heart, Global Soul

November 21, 2017

Baarle’s Old Town Hall, And Sails Through The Air…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On the corner of the “T” intersection opposite the “Den Engel” (The Angel) Hotel, stands the old ‘Stadhuis’ (Town Hall).

Since I have a small obsession with weather vanes, I photographed this one quite a lot (please endulge me) after all what’s not to like when wrought iron and art come together?

This weather vane depicts a little sailing vessel navigating a rough sea, the black ironwork supplemented with gold highlights.

Not only is the building an imposing structure, I find the tower to be a wonderful piece of architecture too.

Both were difficult at first to photograph from close by and I only the next day found a better vantage point from across the street when we approached from the other direction.

An information board on the side of the Stadhuis tells us: “Baarle is one village. Baarle-Hertog is part of Belgium and is 748 hectares in area. This consists of a village centered around a church called Zondereigen and 21 enclaves surrounded by Dutch soil.  Baarle-Nassau is Dutch and has a total area of 7.638 hectares. This consists of the core of Baarle-Nassau with seven counter-enclaves (an enclave within an enclave) and one enclave surrounded by Belgian soil, the hamlet of Castelre  and the church village of Ulicoten. And finally there is a little piece of no-mans land of about 1.18 hectares. Baarle has grown from a settlement that already existed in 54 A.D. when Caesar came here. The  the name of Baarle appears for the first time in a deed in which Countess Hilsondis bequeathed all of her possessions on the 1st June 992 to the Abby of Thorn.”

The weather varied considerably even throughout the length of one day, but we were lucky most of the time and kept more or less dry. Taking the wheelchair we went back and forth around the center of town so these are a compilation of photos taken during our stay.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)[/

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

3 Comments »

  1. Any way you look at it, that is one magnificent weather vane! That it is mounted on a bell tower adds much to the magnificence. I would so very much love to hear those bells chiming, I love bell towers!! The Town Hall is a beautiful piece of architecture with many interesting details. Your photos are amazing and the history dating back to Caesar is fascinating to me. You are an excellent tour guide. I must tell you yet again… I enjoy your posts immensely and look forward to each one. You open a world that I would not otherwise experience. Thank-you!

    Comment by Ellen — November 21, 2017 @ 2:14 pm | Reply

    • Ellen,
      You may travel in my virtual suitcase any time! I have over 3000 posts (Sorry I have not Categorized them all very well, that’s on a long “to do” list) but if you want to wander around through older posts there are plenty more places on this blog to visit. Nice to see that I’m not the only one who loves weather vanes and bell towers 🙂

      Comment by kiwidutch — November 21, 2017 @ 9:32 pm | Reply

      • I love it and I’ll be traveling in marvelous company! Thank-you!!

        Comment by Ellen — November 22, 2017 @ 7:49 pm | Reply


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