Local Heart, Global Soul

January 10, 2018

A Small Tour Of The Four Winds…

Filed under: Historical,Monster,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Visiting the “de Vier Winden” (the Four Winds) in the small village south of The Hague, our visitors are delighted to find that the mill is open to visit.

The February weather was cold and very windy so getting inside was a welcome ideal too.

Inside however there is a ridiculously steep staircase, far too steep for me to attempt, and one of our visitors also looked at it and decided to stay on the ground floor with me.

There were a few words I the brochure that I could not translate and they even stumped Himself, apparently our knowledge of technical mill terms in somewhat lacking.

The brochure translates as” “stichting vrienden van de molen” Friends of the mill Foundation”Structure of the mill.
5th Zolder “ (5th attic) This is the pivot point for the windmills sails. This area is not open to the public.

4th Zolder “ (forth attic) this is the area for wheat / grain storage. The wheat is hoisted up through “luiwerk” (trapdoors??) and via a duct made of jute sacks it is bought down again.

3rd Zolder (third attic). This is the stone floor where there are three grinding stones. Two of these are still in use.
2nd Zolder .(Second attic). This is where the flour is milled to a fine powder. The wheat comes from the upper floors for this. There is also a “Praathuis” (??) for the miller. Outside are the controls for the sails and machinery. 1st Zolder . (First attic). Here there is a “de buil” (??) with a sieve, this area is not operational. Ground floor. Used to be the storage area for the wheat, now is is the exhibition area for the mill.History: in already in 1311 in exactly the same spot where the “de Vier Winden” stood a corn mill. The round stone Mill “ was in rebuilt in 1882 after the previous mill burnt down in 1881. The “de Vier Winden”  was in business until 1932 .

In 1957 the municipality of Moster Gemente Monster (city council).
Ownership of the mill: After restoration in the mill went back into business and from 1983 until today has been run by volunteers from the “Gilde van Virjwillige Molenaars” (Volunteer Millers Guild).

They grind the wheat into whole grain flour. After reorganisation of municipal boundaries from 2004 the mill ownership was transferred to the Gemente Westland (Westland City Council).

Exhibition: on the ground floor where the wheat used to be stored, there is now an exhibition area.
Here you can find old photos of the mill and a unique collection of mill tools from the past.

They sell pancake mix and whole wheat flour. Souvenirs such as postcards, a mill book, tiles and pen drawings are for also sale.

Various Mill sail positions.
“Vreugdestand” (C3lebration Position) The sails get tied , this happens on special occasions such as National holidays, weddings, births of important figures.
“ Rouwstand” (mourning position) The sails get tied into position to mark National mourning of an important figure.
“Korte rust” (short rest position) the sails are in a horizontal or vertical position, the sails look like a “+” sign.
“ Lange rust” (long rest position) the sails are at an angle of 45 degrees with the horizon.The sails look like an “X” because they are low there is less chance for lightening to hit. “

Himself, one of our visitors and Kiwi Daughter all braved the ladder-like staircase and took a look outside. I stayed and took photos of the exhibition area. The mill is small and whilst the exhibition was not large, it was interesting for us to see. Our guests were delighted to have seen inside an actual Dutch windmill. Of course when a place is run by volunteers and on a next to nothing budget, is it difficult to make brochures in languages other than Dutch, but aside from that this is a perfect place to bring visitors.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

6 Comments »

  1. It is wonderful that volunteers keep this windmill from falling into ruin. I would climb the steep stairs, but would not be brave enough to venture outside. What a delightful experience this must have been for your visitors. Thank-you!

    Comment by Ellen — January 10, 2018 @ 2:12 am | Reply

    • Ellen,
      When I came to reply to your comment I saw that not all of the photographs were showing, sorry about that, I seem to be having some troubles getting things right at the moment. My Apologies. Yes, it’s excellent that volunteers keep places like this going, in fact the Dutch have a national “volunteer’ Saturday each year, lists are advertised in your neighbourhood, mentioning what they need help with or other ones and you choose one according to your skills or where you think you fit best.

      Comment by kiwidutch — January 10, 2018 @ 4:54 am | Reply

  2. looks a bit steep for me as well

    Comment by Maureen Sudlow — January 10, 2018 @ 9:50 pm | Reply

    • Maureen,
      The Dutch already do fairly “space saving” staircases, especially compared with New Zealand ones, but this is extreme and definitely more “ladder-like”. NOT recommended for crutches in any way, shape or form!

      Comment by kiwidutch — January 11, 2018 @ 10:04 am | Reply


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