Local Heart, Global Soul

February 1, 2018

Gardens, Floating? Bridges? Not Necessarily In That Order…

Filed under: Marina Bay Sands Hotel,PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

From the Observation deck of Singapore’s Marina Bay Sands, Family Kiwidutch have a really good overview of some of the most famous landmarks in Singapore. The “pictures” on the information boards help to put names to the buildings we can see as well as giving snippets of information to visitors in a multitude of languages. Working our way around the observation deck, I can see and identify sights that might otherwise have gone unnoticed, such as the “Bay East Garden

The Bay East Garden is 32 hectares (79 acres) in size and has a two kilometre promenade frontage that embellishes the Marina Reservoir. It is designed as a series of large tropical leaf-shaped gardens, each with it’s own specific landscaping design, character and theme. Five water inlets are aligned with the prevailing wind direction, maximising and extending the shoreline while allowing wind and water to penetrate the site to help cool areas of activity around them.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Although “Float@MarinaBay” is labelled on one of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel observation deck information board as No.3 and another further along as No.7, the information given for each is exactly the same. The board reads:

The Float@MarinaBay”, Made entirely of steel, the Float@MarinaBay can support up to 1,070 tonnes in weight, with a seating capacity of 30,000 people. It serves as a venue for events on the waters of Marina bay, including sports, concerts, exhibitions and performances such as The National Day Parade. This stadium is also part of the Marina Bay Street  Circuit Turns 17 and 18.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Helix Bridge”. “The Helix Bridge is a pedestrian bridge that links Marina Centre and Marina South. Officially opened on 24 April 2010, the bridge has four viewing platforms providing stunning views of the Singapore skyline and events taking place within Marina Bay. At night the bridge is illuminated with lights that highlight it’s double helix structure, including lighted alphabets “c” (Cytosine), “g” (Guanine, “a” (Adenine) and “t” (Thymine) on the ground, representing the four bases of DNA.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Esplanade”, “The Esplanade boasts the largest performing stage in Singapore. Known affectionately as the “Durian” (a beloved tropical fruit) due to the ridged roof architecture, it’s theatre is built in the style of a traditional European opera house, and it’s concert hall is one of only six in the world with such state-of-the-art acoustics.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Esplanade Bridge”. The Esplanade Bridge is a 260 metre-long, concrete-arched road bridge that spans across the mouth of the Singapore River in Singapore. The bridge was built to provide fast vehicular access between Marina Centre and the financial district of Shenton Way. Construction of the bridge began in early 1994 and was completed in March 1997.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

1 Comment »

  1. […] saw the bridge from the Observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands in this post:“Gardens, Floating? Bridges? Not Necessarily In That Order…”  but getting up close to this beautiful spiral bridge is necessary in order to appreciate […]

    Pingback by Spiraling Around The Helix… | Local Heart, Global Soul — February 19, 2018 @ 1:02 am | Reply


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