Local Heart, Global Soul

March 31, 2019

Getting Close To The Old Masters…

Visiting the Hague’s Mauritshuis last summer, I found myself in a detail fanatic’s haven. The overhead lights on the paintings make taking photographs difficult but getting close to the canvas with the naked eye reveals detail upon detail. The artists differ and so do their styles but the attention to detail stays the same…

(Attributed to) Jacopo de’ Barbari (circa 1460-1516) “Portrait of Hendrick V (1479-1552), Duke of Mecklenburg ( painted 1507)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Han Memling (c1440-1494) “Portrait of a Man from the Lespinette Family” (painted circa 1485-1490).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Hans Holbein II (1597/98-1543) “Portrait of a Woman from Southern Germany” (painted circa 1620-1625).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Jacques Jordaens (1593 – 1678) “The Adoration of the Shepherds’

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gerrit van Honthorst (1592-1656) “Portrait of Amalia of Solms (1602-1675)” painted circa 1632.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gerrit van Honthorst (1592-1656) “Portrait of Frederik Hendrik (1584-1647) painted circa 1641.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), “Old woman and boy with candles (1616-1617)”, painted circa 1615-1617.

‘An old woman gazes ahead, shielding her eyes from the candlelight, whilst the boy behind her holds his candle, ready to be lit. The panel is painted in the style of Caravaggio, who’s work Rubens and seen in Italy. This style is charactorised by it’s exciting effects of light and unpolished naturalism. Rubens did not make this painting to be sold: instead he retained possession of it. He probably used it as it as study material for the pupils in his studio.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Even without flash, oil paint is extremely reflective so I tired to get photos from both lft and right of the painting…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), “Portrait of Michael Ophovins (1570-1637)”, painted circa 1615-1617.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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