Local Heart, Global Soul

June 8, 2019

A Trip To The Zoo…

All of the pieces in the 2017 Garderen Sand sculpture exhibition are a testament to the creativity of the artists who carve them. I have no idea if it is the artist themselves who designs the layout and composition of each of the pieces they sculpt or if they execute them to a brief made by some “master designer”. Whatever the case may be, this next colossus of a piece is made in several parts and is called: “Naar de dierentuin” (which literally translates as “off to the animal garden) but more properly fits into English as “Off to/Going to the Zoo“. Today’s post is a two-parter affair, the first with the overall views of the three large sculptures, the second with some zoomed in detail, because after all, I’m not a self confessed “detail fanatic” for nothing.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

2 Comments »

  1. I presume these are sandstone, not just sand…

    Comment by Maureen Sudlow — June 8, 2019 @ 1:53 am | Reply

    • Maureen,
      No.. ALL of these sculptures from Garderen are JUST sand. They use river sand which has angular sides to the grains, rather than sea sand that has round sides and doesn’t hold together so well. The river sand is then emptied into huge boxes and stamped down with a machine until it is as tightly packed as possible. Then the invited artists come and carve it.
      That’s why I think these are special… and so creative. Even more worth the photographs too because after the season ends they bulldoze it all into a heap so that they can start again on the following year’s exhibition.
      The only thing the outside ones get is a special mist-over with a sort of varnish to help protect it from hail, storms, heavy rain etc since they are completely uncovered, outside from March until November or October.
      There is no shine on the sand at all, so whatever they use is a really light dusting, I remember reading that whatever they use is a spray.
      It’s almost criminal that they have to completely erase these after the season finishes, but they need to sand to reuse of course.
      Amazing aren’t they?

      Comment by kiwidutch — June 9, 2019 @ 8:19 am | Reply


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