Local Heart, Global Soul

June 19, 2019

The Games Go On… But An Icon Passes Away.

Following yesterday’s posts I’m still having fun attempting to name all of the games in the competition section of the 2017 Garderen Sand Sculpture exhibition. These ones I am certain of.

(Number 22) Rumicub

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Number 23) that old family favourite: Monolopy where if you start out well things will probably end well, of not, you were probably doomed to paying out to every other (disgustingly gleeful) player on every turn you make around the board until you suffer the humiliation of not having anything left, even after hawking your 1 house and mortgaging everything to the bank. Guess what, …I didn’t win very often.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Number 24) Nijntje (a.k.a. Miffy in English speaking countries) Although I grew up in New Zealand and had a Dutch father, I didn’t know that Nijntje existed. ( Nijntje =pronounced “nine-cha” the “tje/cha’ sound to rhyme with the “char” as in “swiss chard”). Maybe it’s because we had our own animals as kids, even keeping wild rabbits (illegally) at one point.

The Dutch word for “Rabbit” is “konijn” and adding the diminutive “tje” at the end of the word: “konijntje”, gives the meaning ‘little rabbit’. Shortening this to “Nijntje” brings it to a short form that is easy for small children to say. The reason Nijntje is here shown in tears, is because creator Dick Bruna passed away on 20th February 2017 at 89 years of age, just weeks before the Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition opened for the year. I have no idea what the card game featuring Nijntje is, that was new to me.

Regular reader Marie-Jacqueline came  to the rescue again with the following information about the Nijntje card game…

The game you refer to is KWARTET. It’s a card game. It seem to find it’s origin in the Netherlands. In this case Dick Bruna made it with only figures in the style of Nijntje and the figures, things environment connected with her. This let children who can’t read can play it. Quartet card game.  Quartets came are available with all kinds of subjects to choose from. A quartet is a collection of multiple sets of 4 matching cards. Start of the game: Each player gets 5 cards. Keep the cards in your hand and do not show them to the other players. Put the deck of remaining cards closed on the table. It rarely happens, but if you receive 4 cards of the same set, you have a complete quartet, which you can put open on the table.

Course of the game: Decide who starts the game. When it is your turn, ask one of the other players a card you do not possess. This must be a card of a quartet (set) of which you own at least have 1 card. Say the name of the quartet [for example ‘ ‘] and ask for the card from the quartet you want to have. If that player has the card, then he must hand this card over to you. You may than continue asking cards, also from another player. If the player does not have the requested card, your turn is finished.
You can take a card from the deck. The last player from whom you asked a card, takes the next turn. If you have a complete set of 4 cards, you say out loud: ‘Quartet!’ and put the quartet open on the table. End of the game: When all players have played all their cards, the game is over. The player with the most quartets is the winner.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia / cartoon storybook charactor / dutch/ Miffy / Nijntje

Stuffdutchpeoplelike / Dick Bruna / The magic of Nijntje

5 Comments »

  1. Sad news about the creator of the sculptures. I would never play Monopoly with my children because I thought it was a horrible game of greed…

    Comment by Maureen Sudlow — June 19, 2019 @ 3:14 am | Reply

    • Maureen,
      Pretty much the only time we played Monopoly was on rainy days camping on a friends farm during the summer holidays. I think our parents thought it was an excellent game for two restless kids to kill the hours of being inside. I don’t think that as kids we were even aware of the real idea of capitalism, bankrupting other players or greed, and whatever our parents thought, I think the chance of a bit of peace and quiet trumped any reservations. We were a family of mostly card players (500, Euchre) so this was one of the few games we had (the others were Yahzee, Ludo and Scrabble). Yes it was sad news about the death of Bruna, but on the other hand he was 89 years of age. The timing was probably the worst since it was so soon before the exhibition opened.

      Comment by kiwidutch — June 19, 2019 @ 2:49 pm | Reply

  2. The card game featuring Nijntje is called kwartet (Eng: Quartets). It is a card game for younger children, somewhat similar to Go Fish. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartets_(card_game) for a better explanation. 🙂

    Comment by Harm Eilering — June 19, 2019 @ 8:40 am | Reply

  3. Here I go again!

    The game you refer to is KWARTET.
    It’s a card game.
    It seem to find it’s origin in the Netherlands.

    In this case Dick Bruna made it with only figures in the style of Nijntje and the figures, things environment connected with her.
    This let children who can’t read can play it

    Quartet card game
    Quartets came are available with all kinds of subjects to choose from.
    A quartet is a collection of multiple sets of 4 matching cards.

    Start of the game: Each player gets 5 cards. Keep the cards in your hand and do not show them to the other players. Put the deck of remaining cards closed on the table. It rarely happens, but if you receive 4 cards of the same set, you have a complete quartet, which you can put open on the table.

    Course of the game:
    Decide who starts the game.
    When it is your turn, ask one of the other players a card you do not possess. This must be a card of a quartet (set) of which you own at least have 1 card.

    Say the name of the quartet [for example ‘ ‘] and ask for the card from the quartet you want to have.
    If that player has the card, then he must hand this card over to you.
    You may than continue asking cards, also from another player. If the player does not have the requested card, your turn is finished.
    You can take a card from the deck.
    The last player from whom you asked a card, takes the next turn.

    If you have a complete set of 4 cards, you say out loud: ‘Quartet!’ and put the quartet open on the table.

    End of the game:
    When all players have played all their cards, the game is over.

    The player with the most quartets is the winner.

    Comment by Marie-Jacqueline — June 19, 2019 @ 9:16 am | Reply


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