Local Heart, Global Soul

April 21, 2019

Something For Every Taste And Style…

During every Thursday and Sunday in summer in the Lange Voorhout, centre of the Hague there is a book and antique market. Since I attended the 2017 Food Truck festival on a Saturday, I found the two event side by side. There are some interesting stalls, something for every taste and style. Even though they are apart from the Food Truck festival I managed to find a could of food stalls too. One had a variety of fresh baked vegetable pies, the other, glass jars that contained ingredients for bread, muffins and soup. Each stall is well worth a browse, enjoying the ambience with the rest of the visitors.


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)


(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 20, 2019

Cats Wearing Glasses? …OK, Why Not!?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back during the Food truck festival of 2017, I found that not only were the foodie vans in full swing, so were various other vendors.

Some were the same stall holders that can found on the Lange Voorhout every summer, antiques, bric-a-brac, books, and the like but some I have never seen before.

Amongst those were two stalls that made me stop and look closer…

The first was a lady selling Tee-shirts and card with copies of her own painted artworks, the subject of which was what made me smile.

Dogs, cats, pigs and all sorts of animals were depicted wearing hats, glasses and other paraphernalia.

Although not to kind of thing that I would wear personally, they were wonderful pieces of art.

The second was a lady selling some of the most unusual jewelry I have ever seen, incorporating amongst others, (I assume plastic) mice, lizards, spiders and crabs. Talk about a “statement piece” of jewelry! These make one of the biggest statements and most eye-catching pieces I have ever seen! Again, not really anything I  could pull off, but definitely for someone bolder out there to love and enjoy. I’m just not certain what happens if you walk into the room wearing all these mice around your neck and encounter someone who is scared of mice: would they leap into the nearest chair? or does that only count for real rats and mice? Not having any fear of mice I wouldn’t know how that would work. Both of these are quirky, unusual, colourful, delightful, and artistic. Neither suit my taste but hey, the world would be a very boring place if we all liked the same thing…  and the idea of cats in sunnies? (sunglasses) …What’s not to like?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 14, 2019

Good Mood Food… Everywhere!

Attending the 2017 Food truck festival in the Hague was an excellent experience.  I don’t know it this is a yearly event because I didn’t manage any follow-up trips in 2018, but I would be delighted if it was.  As the vendors set up, the numbers of visitors start to swell… there are so many thing to choose from and it’s both a foodie and photographers delight.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Lente soep” (Autumn / Fall soup)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Biodegradable paper pouches for things like fries with a compartment at the top for sauce…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 10, 2019

Bring Your Kids,… and Pets?

Several years ago I attended a weekend Food Truck festival. Himself and I started out early but everything started to fill up fairly quickly. At first I thought this was a small travel pram and assumed a child was inside. Imagine my surprise when the head of this little dog suddenly popped up instead. It was only when I looked more carefully at the “pram” again later that I realised that maybe this hadn’t been something built with children in mind, but was instead a pet carrier. (Not having pet meant this probably wasn’t immediately obvious to me at the time.)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 7, 2019

Light But Probably A Little Too Much Shadow…

Last year I tried to photograph again something that I have found difficult for some time: flowers. I have always struggled to get the shots that I wanted, seeing how other photographers manage to get so much more detail than I can manage. This time I was trying to get photos of a dandelion, and it’s shadow, but with limited success.  This is a post that I hope to improve on in future posts so I’m saving this first attempt for comparison purposes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 6, 2019

Carving Up a Storm In The Mauritshuis…

The Mauritshuis in the Hague is more than just  place where Old Masters from paintings Golden Age are displayed. It is also Dutch national Monument building in it’s own right. It’s fixtures and fittings are also a work of art on display…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 5, 2019

Catherine, Your Details Are Showing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m continuing today’ post from my one of yesterday, where I tried to show the detail painted in a painting called “St Barbara’.

Today’s post shows the other outer panel of what was an altarpiece triptych, this time a painting called; ‘St Catherine“.

The Mauritshuis in the Hague has a truly amazing collection of Old Masters, many of which are well known.

Sadly the painter called “The Master of Frankfurt” who painted these particular panels is not so well known or acclaimed, and wasn’t probably even from Frankfurt.

In my humble opinion this painter deserves to be more well known, and you don’t even need to be a specialist in Old Masters, an artist or art history buff to appreciate the skill seen in these paintings.

If you look carefully, in one of the photographs showing the lower right hand corner of the painting, there is one taller plant, and if you look carefully you will see near the flowering head of the plant some of the spokes of a semi-hidden wooden wheel upon which St Catherine stands.

This is of course reference to the wheel on which she was meant to be tortured, it is also depicted as a wheeled machine on top of the mountain as a tiny detail in the top left corner of the painting.

Wikipedia tells us: ‘The Master of Frankfurt (1460–c. 1533) was a Flemish Renaissance painter active in Antwerp between about 1480 and 1520.  The Mauritshuis archive” ‘The Master of Frankfurt‘ Painting: ‘ St Catherine’ (Belongs with ‘St Barbara’)This is the left wing of an altarpiece produced by a 16th-century Antwerp painter known only as the Master of Frankfurt. St Catherine turns towards the missing central panel, which contains a representation of the Holy Family with music-making angels (now at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

St Catherine holds a sword in one hand and a Bible in the other. This martyr was usually portrayed with a sword and a broken wheel, references to the instruments of her torture.

The emperor Maxentius had set his sights on her, but she rejected him. Furious, Maxentius devised a wheel as an instrument of torture, but it was destroyed by a thunderbolt (seen in the upper left-hand corner) before it could harm her. Maxentius then had her beheaded.

The saint’s sumptuous attire is striking. She wears a fancy gown made of costly fabric: golden brocade, white damask and a dazzling material of couleur changeant.”

Dazzling material is an understatement: the white damask has layers of detail as does the red and gold bodice.

But even better, the tiniest bits of the painting also shine: there are two people fishing from the bridge on the right hand side of the panel, the square links in the chain that drops down the front of her dress are perfect in form.

The hilt of the sword she carries is amazingly decorative, the tassels on the dress, the clasps in the book (not stated which book specifically, but possibly a Bible in order to emphasize her sainthood?).

The detail in the plants and flowers, the beautiful headdress (which was a bit too high up for me to photograph really well), are just some of the exquisite details that go together to make this Old Master a true masterpiece that deserves a wider audience.

The detail in these two panels is nothing short of stunning, and it can be assured that I will be stopping to renew my admiration of this pair of panels and their painter, every time I visit the Mauritshuis. The “Master of Frankfurt” may have been just a nickname, but even without true and one hundred percent final attribution to one exact person, the genius of skill that lies behind the painting of “St Barbara” and “St Catherine” deserve to come out of the shadows and into the spotlight center stage.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 4, 2019

Brilliance Indeed By The (Old) Master Of Frankfurt…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Visiting the Mauritshuis last summer I walked past two paintings standing side by side.  A quick first glace was enough to stop me in my tracks for a closer look, a much closer look. They were both by the artist “Meester van Frankfurt ‘

Wikipedia tells us:  ‘The Master of Frankfurt (1460–c. 1533) was a Flemish Renaissance painter active in Antwerp between about 1480 and 1520.

Although he probably never visited Frankfurt am Main, his name derives from two paintings commissioned from patrons in that city, the Holy Kinship (c. 1503) in the Frankfurt Historical Museum and a Crucifixion in the Städel museum.”

He is one of many anonymous artists identifiable by their painting style but not by name. The Master of Frankfurt is, however, often thought to be a Hendrik van Wueluwe, an artist famous in Antwerp around the same time as the anonymous painter but otherwise unconnected to any paintings.

His dated Self portrait of the artist with his wife in its original frame (1496; Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp) reveals that the artist was 36 years old at the time it was made, as well as a member of Antwerp’s Guild of St. Luke.

If he is the same artist as Van Wueluwe, then he was also dean of the guild six times. Attributed paintings include his self-portrait, the Festival of the Archers (1493; Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp), and the two paintings in Frankfurt.

The Master of Frankfurt is also known for painting numerous copies after earlier Netherlandish painters such as Rogier van der Weyden and Hugo van der Goes for the open market and for developing, around 1500 in Antwerp, a new artistic style alongside his more famous contemporary Quentin Metsys.

Attributed to the Master of Frankfurt, who also painted “Holy Family with Music Making Angels’, circa 1515, oil on panel, 156.2 cm × 155.9 cm (61.5 in × 61.4 in), which is located in th Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. “Holy Family with Music Making Angels” is the central panel of a triptych altarpiece.

The two side panels depict two virgin martyrs, St Catherine and St Barbara (now in the Mauritshuis, The Hague). ”

This painting, one of those side panels depicts: “St Barbara”, 1510-1520, oil on panel 158.7 x 70.8 cm (each), The Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague.
These are the left and right panels of a triptych altarpiece. The central panel depicts the Holy Family with Music Making Angels (now in the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool).’

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

St Barbara is the right hand panel of the triptych,  and apparently according to the Mauritshuis website,

To keep men at a distance, Barbara’s father locked her up in a tower. While imprisoned, she converted to Christianity.

The tower had two windows, but she had a third built, so that the three windows would symbolise the Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

The tower thus became her attribute. In this painting she also holds a book and a large ostrich feather, the meaning of which is unclear.

The plants around Barbara’s feet – including a splendid dark blue iris in the left foreground – were painted with great precision.”

To say that the plants were painted with great precision almost implies that the rest of the painting was not, but nothing could be further from the truth, the entire panel screams detail upon detail, precision, exacting accuracy, clarity and sharpness.

As usual, photographing an oil painting under lights poses problems with glare, but the levels of detail make unveiling the “layers” in the painting a bit like peeling an onion. The detail in the plant, dress, background, decorative elements, fabric…except that peeling this “onion” might move you to cry tears of joy…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 3, 2019

Eggers Blows My Mind…

Today I am continuing from my yesterday’s post, and looking at the marble bust by Bartholomeus Eggers. The more I look at this bust the more I think it deserves some extra attention because the detail is so exceptional.  I’ve tried to make a few notes to explain my reasons for these photographic choices…

Bartholomeus Eggers (c1637-1692) (Copy After) Bust of Johan Maurits, Count of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679) Sculpted 1664.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): Take a moment to consider that the materials used to make these beautiful patterns consist of mainly just hammers against chisels…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below):  Getting those line straight and crisp… surely the sculptor would be holding his breath with every chisel blow, etching out the design from the block of marble.

(Below):

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): the deep holes in the hair could be prone to chipping in the thinnest areas…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): A masterpiece of design and execution…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): This gradating central pattern running down a sort of ridge, down the centre of the breastplate just blows my mind and is one of my favourite parts of the bust, even though it is so simple in design.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): Layers of depth and design…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): the ruffle on the left hand sleeve… I’m letting out a deep sigh of satisfaction and admiration… this is stunning…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): I’m not too sure what this vine (or is at a snake?) is at the top of this left hand sleeve…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): That chiseled out medal, or order of… thingy… contrasted with the flowing design of the stylized acanthus leaf design…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): necktie clasp details and the deep groove detail under the collar…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): Face detail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): These ruffles at the end of the sleeves…. right hand sleeve this time…drool… AND detail underneath the freestanding arm…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(below) There is even a tiny elephant detail on top of the belt on the side…  I wish I’d taken more photographs of it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below):  the hand coming out of the sleeve has “skin” that looks smooth and soft…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below): Finger detail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

April 2, 2019

Bettcha You Can’t Do THIS On A 3D Printer!

The Mauritshuis in The Hague doesn’t just have exceptional paintings on show: there are also beautiful works in stone. I am a tad confused by the “Copy After” in the short information panel that was nearby. Does this mean I was looking at the copy, or did it mean that Eggers was modelling his representation of Maurits on some earlier piece by someone else that I didn’t see mentioned?

The name further down on the plinth says: “Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679)’ which pretty much duplicates the information on the accompanying Information panel, so I am not immediately (or later for that matter), any the wiser.

Either way, what I see before me is nothing short of amazing… Bettcha can’t do this on a 3D printer!

Bartholomeus Eggers (c1637-1692) (Copy After) Bust of Johan Maurits, Count of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679) Sculpted 1664.”

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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