Local Heart, Global Soul

June 30, 2020

Being Shown The Door…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s my very last post from Hollandspoor train Station’s stunning Queen’s/King’s waiting room, which opened to the public especially for “Monumentendag” 2019.

This gives visitors a small glimpse at what lay behind the beautiful doors on the platform.

The WaitingRoom is usually closed, to protect and preserve the stunning handmade interior.

Now I am no longer sure when this historic site could be opened again, at least in 2020, unless a vaccine for the coronavirus can be found.

These beautiful wood panels, stair handles are not made for scrubbing tens-of-times a day, nor the fabric, handmade wallpapers and other items if the public don’t keep their paws where they should.

It’s been a privileged to have been shown around here.

I’m only disappointed that the tour is only given in Dutch, which more or less excludes non-Dutch visitors.

This additional exit door in the irregularly shaped baggage room was not one to which we were allowed entrance but it’s beautiful just the same.

It’s probably fitting that a door marks my final post here, my blog exits here to another topic, hopefully one that you enjoy as much as these ones.

June 29, 2020

Consistantly Beautiful…

As our group of  “Monumentendag” visitors are requested to go back upstairs, I hung back just a little in order to get some photographs of the stained glass windows and beautiful architectural detailing of where the stair landing ceiling is. I didn’t get to see the sun shining through these windows but it obvious from the detail in them that they must be a delight to the eye. As a lover of stained glass, wood, iron, tile etc the decorative elements in Hollandspoor train Station’s Queen’s/King’s waiting room are consistently beautiful…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 28, 2020

Baggage Area Detail…

Following yesterday’s post, I’m looking at the detailed sections of the “irregular” shaped entrance/exit room of the Hollandspoor train Station Queen’s/King’s waiting room. Even this baggage area has decorative tiles on the walls, and outside, seen through the window, a fixed canopy provides shade or shelter from the elements as visitors alight or embark their transportation on their way to their destinations.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 27, 2020

Highly Irregular…

This irregular shaped room at the bottom of the staircase in the Queen’s/King’s Waiting room at Hollandspoor train Station in the Hague is the inside section of the royal street entrance, where all of the baggage would have been unloaded. I assume that Royal visitors and VIP’s would wait in comfort upstairs in the regal waiting rooms until all of the luggage had been taken care of, and  would just be called upon at the last moment to alight the awaiting carriages or automobiles.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 26, 2020

I’m Absolutely Floored!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My “Monumentendag” visit in 2019  bought me to Hollandspoor train station in The Hague.

This is one weekend every year where churches, Government and historic buildings open their doors to the public for one or two days of the Monumentendag weekend.

The private behind-the-scenes-look that we get here is special because it teaches us about the history of the city, the Netherlands, and how things may (or may not) have changed over the centuries.

The Queen’s/King’s Waiting Room at the station is as much as show-piece of Dutch trades as it is a functional structure, and this literally extends from the ceiling to the floor.
This landing is as beautiful as it is skilful, the tiles handcrafted and the patterns working well together. The centuries of wear and tear are still here as testament that this was a busy working building and that many articles of luggage, crates and chests passed through this area.

This is also the area where passengers would board waiting coaches, and later motorcars, for their journey to the working Palace in the centre of the city, or the Royal residential palace a short distance away. I’m not really certain where visiting Royalty would stayed. Sadly I have no royal or VIP friends to ask!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 25, 2020

Two Beautiful Ladies…

Following yesterday’s post, I’m looking at two beautiful paintings in the Queen’s/King’s waiting room stairwell.  They stand opposite each other, one at the top of where the stairs take a ninety degree turn downwards, the other at the bottom.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 24, 2020

Place To Pee For Non-VIP’s…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Monumentendag” (historic buildings are open annually to the public for one or two days year) in 2019 brought me to the taken me to Queen’s/Kings waiting room in Hollandspoor train Station in the Hague.

The second lavatory we were shown here in the Queen’s/Kings waiting room in the Hague did not come with the “absolutely no photographs of the privy” requirement of the one upstairs.

No Head of State or Royal buttocks have ever graced the seat of this one then.

This one was for the use of “other” officials, the non-VIPs.

Located in the room where passengers would exit the station and board their awaiting carriage or motor car if they were arriving in the city, or where they would enter before going upstairs and waiting for a train.

Like the lavatory upstairs it was very generously proportioned.

Maybe strangely because we have become accustomed to seeing lavatories positioned at right angles or parallel to the walls, this one is angled on the diagonal, and for some odd reason I found that rather funny.

The walls of the cubicle were rather tall, so not able to be photographed in detail in one shot. Therefore this first photographs shows the decorative tiles around the walls at the bottom, and the second photograph the decorated spindles and ornamentation at the top. The hand basin was next door and there were radiators here too so there was still an excellent level of comfort.

I suppose in today’s terms the folks relegated to this privy were not  like the “A-listers” who used the upstairs convenience, but they were still probably “B-listers” who enjoyed an extremely privileged life… and even Non-VIP^s need to pee…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 23, 2020

A Very Stylish Entrance…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Above the one of the large doors near the stairs in the Queen’s/King’s waiting room in Hollandspoor train station, is a coat of arms, or maybe a section of one.  Wikipedia’s page for the Dutch Royal Family Coast of Arms usually shows the lion on the shield supported by a further two lions, but in this case these supporter have been replaced by a male and female figure.

The woman also holds a branch of something above the crown, possibly a Laurel or Olive branch? (Olive leaves are more slender than what I see in the top photograph though).

The lion in the centre of the shield, brandishes a sword and holds a what a further Wiki page for a description of the Coat of arms of the Netherlands details as a sheave of “seven arrows Argent (silver) pointed and bound together Or. (The seven arrows stand for the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht.)”

One thing is for sure: This is a very stylish entrance!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 22, 2020

A Very Generous Staircase…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During “Monumentendag” 2019, when historic buildings are open to the public for one or two days of the Monumentendag weekend, I visited the Queen’s/Kings waiting room inside Hollandspoor train Station in the Hague.

As I’ve mentioned before, this is both a practical hub to wait and freshen up after a long train journey, or a carriage ride from one of the royal palaces, and a massive showing-off-piece of Dutch industry.

Showcasing the best quality workmanship with best quality materials, this in-your-face  over the top exhibition of grandeur was expected to Wow visiting Heads of State and VIP’s as they first stepped into the city.

The staircase is no less impressive and certainly not the “usual* staircase that 90% of Dutch homes would have (known for being ridiculously steep and occasionally a bit scary at first for new non-dutch visitors). In fact, Himself and I are having a new kitchen installed and it arrives next week. I’m having my refrigerator dream of an American style fridge installed and in order to get it up our staircase, we will have to not only have to remove the hand rail, but also all of the banisters as well.

The Dutch architects of the past usually seemed to view staircases as a necessity that is actually a waste of space, making them as compact as possible as a trade off to allow as much extra living space as possible. The staircase here has no such problem and Royal groups would not have had their travelling clothes unduly ruffled in the slightest as they made their way up or down. The wrought iron is a work of beauty as well. even more icing on this very fancy cake.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 21, 2020

Oooh That Look!

In yesterday’s post I was looking at the amazing decoration inside the Queen’s/king’s waiting room at Hollandspoor train station. First the ceilings, walls and floors around the stair area and now, lastly the columns in the pillars by the staircase. There are a a couple of birds fighting over a snake and a cherub at the bottom who, judging by the look on it’s face doesn’t look like it is particularly amused by the situation going on or is having a particularly great day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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