Local Heart, Global Soul

February 16, 2019

For Drawing Cobbles And Tiles…

Ok, a weird “Arty” post just for myself.  It’s all very well wanting to draw an object if you are in the drawing mood, but what do you do with the background? How do you fill in details of the ground, of cobbles and bricked pavements? Ditto for things like roof lines, how do you draw the tiles that cover them if you can not see them up close and understand how they fit together? the light and shade? texture? colour? and everything else you need to literally fill in the gaps? For me the answer is to make a post that delights me and probably has you all scratching your heads. This is a handy place for my “reference files.” If you are arty it might be something you do too? Don’t worry: “normal service” will be resumed tomorrow.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 14, 2019

Finding An Art Deco Design…

Zierikzee has building of all ages, here’s one in the Art Deco style…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 13, 2019

Age, And The Texture That Comes With It…

Filed under: Architectural Detail,ART,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

Throughout the centuries, old buildings in the Netherlands did not often just get pulled down. I suppose that the cost and the unwillingness to waste good building materials was a good motivation for just “adding on” rather than “starting over”. This is why it is possible to see all mixtures of styles and building materials in buildings that are centuries old. The original was probably begin between 1500 and 1600, all of the extra additions added in a piecemeal fashion  or by levels after that. Today these are historic buildings of special note of course, not necessarily famous for anything that happened in them, or people who resided in them, just valued because they are still standing after all this time.

Like all old Dutch cities Zierikzee has it’s fair share of these buildings, so in one very narrow street I spied several adjoining buildings that are probably listed somewhere in a historic building register. A mix and match of stone and brick, they have their characteristic wrought iron pins that hold walls to walls, and the look of age that can not be duplicated other than to likewise stand for four or five hundred years in all weathers and seasons. The street was so narrow that I stood with my back touching the buildings on the opposite side and still couldn’t get any wide shot to include any decent amount of these weathered neighbours. This post is all about age, and the texture that comes with it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 12, 2019

A Walk Down Century Lane…

The building that I looked out on whilst I visited Zierikzee’s Stadhuis (City Council /Town Hall) are as old as the Stadhuis too. Together they stand as a testament to beautiful architecture of centuries past and retain many of the original features. Once back outside I photographed the façades, with the brickwork patterns, shutters, and stepped gables. Less a “walk down memory lane” and more a “walk down century lane”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 8, 2019

Stadhuis Rooms…

Other parts of Zierikzee’s Gemeente Stadhuis (City council / Town Hall) that I managed to visit during the 2017 Easter break, were several beautiful rooms. However I didn’t see all of the Stadhuis by any means because of time constraints, mostly due to my taking time out to keep sitting down to have a rest. One room has a large piece that has been made with thousands of sea shells. Marble pieces above the fireplaces are also amazing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 3, 2019

Driehoek… A Three Sided House?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next beautiful building that caught my eye in Zierikzee during our 2017 Easter holiday break was this building.

Closer inspection revealed a plaque that tells us that it has a name:  “Driehoek” (which translates as “Triangle’).

“Driehoek” : “The origins of this house date from the year 1600, and it was built on the site of an earlier house.

It was probably built by Cornelis Stevense Cooper; secretary, alderman, councilor and mayor.

It remained a residential building until 1838. In 1925 it became a school.

In 1986 it got the name “the triangle” because it housed three organisations.”

Duh, and there was I looking at the gables of the building trying to work out if there were three sections and if the building itself was in any way three sided! (Yes, I felt silly for that one!).

I like the “step” gables anyway, it’s easy to see how they got their name and then my second thought: ” it’s obvious that the Netherlands isn’t in an earthquake zone… these brick frontages would be long removed in New Zealand!”.

It’s good that frontages like these can be enjoyed, maybe never in earthquake prone countries but enjoyed by visitors here in Zierikzee.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 2, 2019

De Zoutkeet, But This Is NO Shed…

Spending the 2017 Easter break in Zierikzee, Zeeland, I found some amazing buildings to photograph.

This one has etched window decoration, and a plaque nearby on the wall that says:

De Zoutkeet”
“Oorspronkelijk herberg en logement, later verbouwd tot patricierswoning. Het pand dateert uit de 16e/17e eeuw. De Hardstenen gevel is in Lodewijk XVI stijl (laat 18e eeuw)”

Translated into English; Zoutkeet (literally = salt shed), “origionally an inn and hotel, later turned into a Patrician house (the home of someone from a ruling class and/or the aristocracy). The building  dates from the 16th / 17th century. The front façade is made from hard stone /granite and is in the Louis XVI style (late 18th century).

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 1, 2019

Making Up Pleasing Architectural Detail…

A Photographic essay of the streets of central Zierikzee, some taken seated on random house steps with the telephoto lens, others with the car window rolled down, the rest as we travelled in and out of the city several times. I like the combinations of light, textures, shapes, plus the quirkiness of centuries old buildings that lean with their not-quite-straight walls and bricks of different colours and ages. Then there are the  decorative elements: different coloured bricks producing patterns in the brickwork, fancywork on the iron bolts holding walls together, scrolls, arches, all the little things that make up pleasing architectural detail.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 31, 2019

Posting A Letter: And A Mystery…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another place I pass during my 2017 Easter break in Zierikzee was a local post office.

These establishments are becoming as rare as hens teeth in the Netherlands, the rapid rise of email and electronic communication having depleted letter post wholesale.

The rise of internet purchases and subsequent parcel post meant that separate couriers arrive for packages, and the humble letter, greeting card, postcard and stamps have been dispatched to a counter located in a tobacconist, book shop or the like.

What hasn’t changed are the large letter boxes,  they are sometimes bigger in size because there are now fewer of them around the neighbourhood too.

Here in The Netherlands there are different slots for different places, so local Zierikzee post, The Netherlands, Europe / Outside Europe are possibilities, depending on the instructions on the front of the box. This makes for faster sorting and quicker delivery.

Behind it however is a very curious stone plaque that incorporates a letterbox in the wall of the post office.

I looked up the “Coat of Arms for Zierikzee and found that it “consists of a black lion rampart, on a red background, with a saber from it’s mouth, topped with  shield covered in a crown and the letter “Z” in gold on each side of the lion“.

This clearly isn’t it. This stone plaque has two lions rampart, standing apart in the top left and right corners. They both face left and there are two small banners above that semi-connect them.

My guess would be that these represent waves, but I could of course be wrong. Underneath the lions flies a bird… which by the wing length and shape of the body looks (at least to me) more like a seagull than anything else, and then the letter slot and beneath that the words “Anno 1940” (Year 1940). I did a search of Coats of Arms for Zeeland and came up with nothing even vaguely similar so this one is a mystery to me. If anyone knows I’d love to find out what this one means or what it belongs to.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 30, 2019

Pumping Up The History Of The Gemeente…

Outside the Stadhuis (City Council / Town Hall) in Zierikzee, stands a very old pump. Probably not only in use as a water supply for horses and livestock, but also as a source of clean water for those in the nearby streets too since over the course of human history, indoor plumbing is a relatively recently addition to people’s homes. The plaque tells us that The Family de Jong Foundation restored this in 2013, and I therefore assume it was thereafter gifted to the city. The handle stands in a locked position so if it works or not is unknown but it’s an interesting piece of local history and architectural detail to find on the street.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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