Local Heart, Global Soul

November 17, 2016

Heraldic Detail That’s Right Up My Street…

During the summer, Himself, Little Mr and I enjoyed a Sunday trip to Gouda. During our visit I came across a beautiful door that had a detailed and colorful coat of arms above it. The decoration is superb, the detail… literally right up my street. Naturally I got out my camera and got a few photographs.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

June 2, 2016

Show Us Your Ivories…

It is not just ceramic work or wood carving on show here in the Rijksmuseum, there are also many examples of finely carved ivory. Naturally these were behind glass and in a light controlled area so photography was not easy without a tripod. I did however get a few photographs of some of them: here is a small sample of the items on show…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

May 24, 2016

Your Face Is Set In Stone, Your Hair In A Permanent Wave…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the Portrait room there are more than portraits in painted form, there  are also ones carved in marble too.

These busts are of prominent people of the time, and the detail not just in the faces but also in the texture of the hair, hands and cloth around them is nothing short of stunning.

It’s amazing that even the veins on the hands are so intricately carved, and such realism achieved.
Portrait of  Johannes Munter” Carrara marble, Amsterdam 1673, attributed to Bartholomeus Eggers (1637- before 1692)
Bartholomeus Eggers was one of the young sculptors trained by Artus Quellinus in his Amsterdam workshop.

Eggers’ portrait of Mayor Johannes Munter is still strongly influenced by his teacher’s style. However, the sculptor introduced a playful motif: Munter plays with the tassels of his collar with his left hand, subtly subverting the formal character of the bust.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Portrait of Gerard Schaep van Cortenhoeff” Carrara marble, attributed to Bartholomeus Eggers (1637- before 1692)
Gerard Schaep was one of the many conservative Calvinists among the Amsterdam regents. He was held in high esteem for his many years of public service: elected mayor a total of eleven times and served as the Republic’s envoy extraordinary to Denmark and Sweden. This lofty status warranted a monumental bust portrait in marble.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

May 23, 2016

Hare, Doggie, Doggie, Doggie, Doggie…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m still in the Portrait gallery of the Rijksmuseum, having looked at the portrait of the three Regentesses  in yesterday’s post, I am now taking a closer look at the fireplace and chimneypiece over which it stands.

The information panel reads:

Chimneypiece from the Leprozenhuis, Amsterdam” Marble, marbleized oak and pine. Northern Netherlands circa 1668.
This chimneypiece is made of marble and marbleized wood The horizontal frieze is decorated with carved auricular-style tendrils and flowers: nestled among them are the family arms of the three Regentesses portrayed by Ferdinand Bol: Clara Abba, Elisabeth van Duynen and Agatha Munter.”

This fireplace and chimneypiece has a lot of wonderful delftsblauwe (delft blue) tiles, mostly depicting dogs in sitting, standing and all sorts of jumping positions.

There are also rabbits, foxes, horses and other animals but it’s the digs who take centre stage throughout the montage. The shield decorations are wonderful too, but in a different way, the tiles are all about movement, humour, whimsy and character.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Chimneypiece 1b (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

May 16, 2016

Does My Butt Look Big In This? This Rear End Is Delicious…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I will come back to a few bits and pieces in the first gallery later, but first I wanted to show you something that made my heart skip a beat.

My friends and I walked through a doorway and found a room full of stunning exhibits, we split up and started reading some of the information boards that went with each piece depending on what first caught our eye.

Once I had read through this one I went to find my friends to make certain that they didn’t miss this.

Amazingly this massive piece of ornate carving used to adorn the stern of a ship from the 1600’s, it has seen thousands of kilometres slip away underneath it, the spray of countless waves has rested on these boards, and all of this precious detail has been lashed by numerous storms.

The information board reads: “Stern carving from the Royal Charles” polychromed wood, circa 1660, England. This coat of arms of King Charles II of England once adorned the stern transom, or “counter”, of the English flagship the “Royal Charles”. The vessel was captured by Dutch forces in 1667 at it’s home port of Chatham, near London and towed over the North Sea to the Netherlands, where it was scrapped. The counter decoration was preserved to commemorate this extraordinary Dutch triumph and England’s defeat.”

I always thought that the rear end of a sailing ship from this time probably had  painted ornamentation rather than carved ones, and I never could have dreamed that if there had been carved decoration that it would be anywhere near as stunningly detailed as this.

Both my friends had managed to enter the room without looking up or behind them, so my excited discovered was met with amazed surprise, they too staring in disbelief at the colossal scale of this carving and the amount of  detail contained within in it.  Mind you with a butt this beautiful who cares it if looks big…Yet again I discover a new item to add to my Arty favourites list… to say that Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum is full of treasures is one of the understatements of the year…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.