Local Heart, Global Soul

August 27, 2018

A Triangular Threesome Of Trees, Scores Points With Me…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There are some new decorative pieces in Cathedral square from when we were here last.

I have a bit of a “thing” about trees and leaves at the moment, and keep a small box of dried leaves, acorns and a few twigs so that I can practice drawing.

I also take more than my fair share of photographs of trees for the same reason, it’s a fascination of form, texture and colours that for me at least never gets old.

It therefore pleases me to see a tree as one of these decorative forms, and in a way two, because the second “tree” is a sort-of-Christmas tree form, made of sheet music.

There the appeal is just the “old paper” look, it’s like viewing an old book, the kind in which the reader had to cut the pages before they could read.

The sheet music “tree” even has a top which extends past the top of the roof of the little kiosk it is located on. On the third side is another “tree” this time a very stylized one, consisting of a triangle made up of smaller triangles all in different colours.

It’s possible to walk inside this little booth, but stupidly at the moment I was going to move around and photograph the inside a tour group arrived and I got distracted. They all took up position just a few metres away from me, so naturally I could also hear the tour guides commentary.

I have to confess at this point that since it was early morning, quiet and with not too many other people around, I became guilty of eavesdropping on the information provided and it was a very interesting commentary too.

Much of it I already knew: the history of the “First Four Ships” that bought the original white settlers, their journey over the steep bridle path track over the Port Hills, but there were other snippets that were new and since they were literally metres away from me, well, my ears could not help but flap… just a little. A short time later when I was inside the “marae” (Maori meeting house structure covered in grasses, directly in front of the Cathedral, I ended up answering a few questions of several of the tour group as they explored around this area of the Square on their own. It was a mixed nationality group of mostly younger people and they were on a whirlwind tour of the city as part of their trip. They would have an afternoon to themselves later so I recommended the Gondola on the Port Hills as a possible excursion. Meanwhile the group had split up and were busy looking at the Cathedral, murals, information boards and statues in the immediate area.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 14, 2018

Building… And Painting With LEGO!

Filed under: ART,LEGO,NEW ZEALAND,Paintings,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON,Wellington. Te PaPa — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch’s visit to Wellington New Zealand’s’ Te Papa continues and our investigation of the impressive LEGO exhibition advances.

LEGO has been used here not only in construction of large ad beautiful buildings, but also amazingly enough, paintings!

Georges-Pierre Seurat (2 December 1859 – 29 March 1891) was a French post-Impressionist painter and draftsman. Noted for innovative use of drawing media and devising the painting techniques known as chromoluminarism and pointillism.

Seurat’s artistic personality was compounded of qualities usually supposed to be opposed and incompatible: extreme, delicate sensibility; and passion for logical abstraction, almost mathematical precision of mind.

His large-scale work, “Dimanche d’été à la Grande Jatte” (A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte) (1884–1886), altered the direction of modern art by initiating Neo-impressionism, and is one of the icons of late 19th-century painting.

The painting shows members of each of the social classes participating in various park activities.

The tiny juxtaposed dots of multi-colored paint allow the viewer’s eye to blend colors optically, rather than having the colors physically blended on the canvas.

It took Seurat two years to complete this 10-foot-wide (3.0 m) painting, much of which he spent in the park sketching in preparation for the work (there are about 60 studies). It is now in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Leonardo da Vinci was an Italian Renaissance polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography.

Da Vinci has been called the father of paleontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter and tank, he epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “Mona Lisa” has been described as: “the best known, the most visited, written about, sung about, parodied work of art in the world”. Also one of the most valuable paintings in the world, it holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in history, worth nearly $800 million in 2017.

The Oriental Pearl Tower has fifteen observatory levels. The highest (known as the Space Module) is at 350 m (1148 ft).A revolving restaurant is located in the 267 m (876 ft) level. There ae also: exhibition facilities, a small shopping center in the structure and a 20-room hotel called the Space Hotel between the two large spheres. The upper observation platform has an outside area with a 1.5 inch glass floor.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Here also is this piece is called: Zeus at Olympia…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia / Georges Seurat / French / Post-Impressionist / Pointillism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Seurat

Wikipedia / A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (French: Un dimanche après-midi à l’Île de la Grande Jatte / Pointillism / Painting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_da_Vinci
Wikipedia / Leonardo da Vinci /

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mona_Lisa
Wikipedia / Leonardo da Vinci / The Mona Lisa / Renaissance / Painting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_Pearl_Tower
Wikipedia / Oriental Pearl Tower / TV tower / Shanghai / China

December 11, 2016

These Paintings Plumb Blow Me Away…

Just as I did with the other “Parels” (Pearls) artist Mirelle, with Ingrid I am saving the best until last. The level of detail in these paintings is something that no photograph can do justice to. You could say that I am “plumb blown away”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 10, 2016

Mastering The Old Masters…

Continuing with yesterday’s post, a photographic post detailing The Hague artist Ingrid’s studies of the old masters. The idea of making detailed copies is so that the same techniques can be learned, and judging from these photographs, Ingrid is making a rather good job of mastering the old masters.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 9, 2016

Visual Notes Keep A Record Of Works And Progress…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

At the end of summer I visited Ingrid, another talented artist showcased in the Hague’s  “Parels” (Pearls) Day, where on this occasion the neighbourhoods featured are the “Flora en Faunawijken” (Flora and Fauna) districts.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, this means all of the streets in these neighbourhoods are named after fruit, trees, flowers etc.

The fold-out map in the Parels booklet lists all of the addresses that can be visited on Parels Day and whilst there were a vast range of hobbies and exhibits to choose from, I thought that getting through two, possibly three in the day would be more than my limit, so went with the artists I liked the most.

Ingrid, like Mirelle in my previous posts, is taking classes in the techniques and styles of the old masters, and if you like a very high standard in your artworks, neither of these ladies disappoint.

What they also have in common is that they make workbook photograph albums of their works, of  “exercise” pieces, documenting works in progress and the finished articles.

These visual “notes” are very important, not just as a method of detailing the techniques covered but also as an inspiring reminder of how the works improve with time and practice. Of course some of the finished pieces go out to friends and family or might be a commission so having a record of work you may not see often or even again is important, whatever your hobby.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 7, 2016

An Invitation To Enjoy …And Drool For Yourself.

The last pieces by artist Mirelle, when I visited for “Parels” (Pearls) Day were, I think are matter of saving the best until last.  The level of detail that she has managed to incorporate into her work is breathtaking and for a detail fanatic like me: absolutely divine. To be honest I could probably dribble on for ages, gushing about, this, that, and well, everything. The superlatives would be flowing like crazy and you would soon start to wonder if I was sane (if you don’t already). Instead I will just invite you to enjoy… and drool for yourself.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 6, 2016

Brings Not Just Delight To The Eye And Hand, but Also To The Soul…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back to my topic of a few posts ago, I am visiting one of the “Parels” (Pearls) artists, a very talented lady called Mirelle.

She is taking a specialised art class that follows and learns to replicate the techniques of the Dutch old masters.

Some of the paintings she has done have been worked on and built up over time towards the end product, and rather wisely she had the idea of taking step-by-step photographs of the process.

Then in another piece of inspiration she had these photographs put into photo books, the type that you make yourself and take in to be printed.

This means that she has an easily accessible “workbook” of sorts that not only reminds her of the steps she needed in order to replicate the process, but also a memory of works done.

Also included in her books were photographs of individual finished “studies”, everything from the parts of the face, instantly recognisable as Vermeer’s “Girl with the pearl earing”  also his “The kitchen maid”, and other works by Rembrandt and Reubens.

Mirelle was surprised and delighted that I named many of the face part paintings by artist immediately but understood when I told her I had studied both practical art and art history, so knew many old masters well.

I think it is a brilliant idea to keep photograph album books detailing the evolving status of the works, especially because in her case she also does work on commission and no longer owns all of her pieces.

There was only one painting I did not recognise, (Mirelle filled me in but I forgot to write it down and forgot because concentration is difficult).

That painting was of what may have been a bishop or cardinal dressed in black robes (…don’t cardinals always wear red or crimson?) and it’s a formal portrait. The man’s right hand is relaxed and open, his left draped in a relaxed pose over the edge of a large leather or velum bound book. Mirelle’s studies concentrated on each of the hands, I love the detail, not only in the hand but also in the book and lace cuff of his shirt. I’m in no current state to take a class like this, but if I were I would be jumping to do it, learning more about this style and technique would be not bring delight to the eye and the hand, but also to the soul.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 24, 2016

Knights And Their Steeds Gallop Under Glass…

The next thing that caught my eye in Restaurant Kreuzritter, at the Burg Satvey Castle in Mechernich, Germany were illustrations of medieval jousting knights on horseback. As with the heraldic shields of yesterday’s post, these are modern items rather than historic ones but the detail is excellent. The drawings also incorporate calligraphy and the use of gold leaf and are exactly the type of style that I love. The problem that pops up though is the same one as with the shields, the glass covering reflects everything and the low light in the room makes for tricky photography. In reality no photograph does these justice, their beauty is seen best up close and personally. I tried every angle I could physically manage and even then you only get an ” idea” of what these are really like. Still, an “idea” is better than nothing, right?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Restaurant Kreuzritter / Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany
Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

August 23, 2016

Not Shielded From The Difficulties Of Capturing Beauty…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s not just the food that I am finding delicious in Restaurant Kreuzritter, located in the grounds of the Burg Satvey Castle in Mechernich, Germany.

There are also paintings of heraldic shields around the walls that I am drawn towards for a closer look.

They are modern rather than historic items but for a detail fanatic such as myself, beauty is beauty, be it young or old.

Someone has spent a lot of time on these, they are intricate and delightful to the eye.

They are however also under glass, in a room with low lighting and many of these lights being the uplighters below them.

This makes them incredibly difficult to photograph, and one very large one was also half behind a pole so even getting a straight on shot was impossible.

Still, I did my best and will enjoy the results as I managed to capture them. These are also going into my digital reference files that I use for artistic inspiration, the colours and patterns are inspirational in themselves. There is also more to see though. I spy a horse  just a little bit further along the wall that looks very interesting indeed….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Restaurant Kreuzritter / Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany
Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

August 5, 2016

Turning A Touring Bike Into An Art Gallery…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post, we have arrived in the German town of Mechernich to visit “Burg Satzvey” castle.

As we entered we were amazed to hear the roar of engines that belonged to a large group of touring motorcyclists, here for one of their large gatherings for the year.

As soon as it became apparent that I was interested in their motors, the owners started telling us all about their pride and joy’s, and the work that some of them have taken to modify their machines.

One in particular could not fail to attract the attention of the arty side of my character: this bike was adorned with painted artworks on almost every conceivable surface.

The owner was delighted that photographs would be taken, and why not?, there are castle and motifs in beautiful painted detail, making works of art on a machine that is in itself also a work of art.

I did not quite understand if these painted castles were mementos of past travels or were chosen for other reasons, but turning the bike into a canvas is a rather practical way of making a mobile art gallery and taking your artworks with you when you also want to be on the open road.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

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