Local Heart, Global Soul

July 31, 2019

Overjssel, “From Over The IJssel…”

Overijssel is a province of the Netherlands located in the eastern part of the country. The province’s name translates to “across the IJssel”, from the perspective of the Episcopal principality of Utrecht by which it was held until 1528. The capital city of Overijssel is Zwolle and the largest city is Enschede. The province had a population of 1,142,360 in 2015.

Wikipedia / Province Overijssel / The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 30, 2019

Twente In The East…

Continuing with the decorative “klompen” (clogs) I found displayed in the 2017 Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition, we are now looking towards the more eastern provinces and Wiki tells us:

Twente is a non-administrative region in the eastern Netherlands, comprising the most urbanised and easternmost part of the province of Overijssel. Twente is most likely named after the ‘Tuihanti’ or ‘Tvihanti’, a Germanic tribe that settled in the area and was mentioned by the Roman historian Tacitus. Twente has approximately 620,000 inhabitants, most of whom live in its three largest cities: Almelo, Hengelo and Enschede, the latter being the main city of the region.’

Wikipedia / Twente / Province Overijssel / The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 29, 2019

North Holland, But Not The Most Northerly Province….

Following yesterdays post, the area we are “visiting” via the painted “klompen” (clogs) is North Holland. “Noord Holland” (North Holland) is a province of the Netherlands located in the northwestern part of the country. It is situated on the North Sea, north of South Holland and Utrecht, and west of Friesland and Flevoland. In 2015, it had a population of 2,762,163 and a total area of 2,670 km2 (1,030 sq mi).

From the 9th to 16th century, the area was an integral part of the County of Holland. During this period West Friesland was incorporated. In the 17th and 18th century, the area was part of the province of Holland and commonly known as the Noorderkwartier (English: “Northern Quarter”). In 1840, the province of Holland was split into the two provinces of North Holland and South Holland. In 1855, the Haarlemmermeer was drained and turned into land.

The capital and seat of the provincial government is Haarlem, and the province’s largest city is the Netherlands’ capital Amsterdam. More than half of the province consists of reclaimed polder land situated below sea level. The West Frisian islands of Noorderhaaks and Texel are also part of the province.”

Wikipedia / Province North Holland / The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 28, 2019

Schiphol, Its Story Continues To Grow…

I fixed the missing text in yesterday’s post (sadly I can only blame this on ‘operator error” rather than a technical failure of any variety. Apologies again.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next Garderen 2017 decorated fiberglass clog is all about Schiphol Airport.

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol , known informally as Schiphol Airport (Dutch: Luchthaven Schiphol, is the main international airport of the Netherlands.

It is located 9 kilometres (5.6 miles) southwest of Amsterdam, in the municipality of Haarlemmermeer, North Holland.

It is the world’s eleventh busiest by total passenger traffic in 2017, third-busiest in Europe in terms of passenger volume and busiest in Europe in terms of aircraft movement.

The airport is built as a single-terminal concept: one large terminal split into three large departure halls.

Schiphol opened on 16 September 1916 as a military airbase.

The end of the First World War also saw the beginning of civilian use of Schiphol Airport and the airport eventually lost its military role completely. In 1949, it was decided that Schiphol was to become the primary airport of the Netherlands. The expansion came at the cost of a small town called Rijk, which was demolished to make room for the growing airport.

Before 1852, the entire Haarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. The most popular story is that in the shallow waters sudden violent storms could claim many ships.

Winds were particularly strong in the Schiphol area since the prevailing wind direction is from the south-west, and Schiphol lies in the north-eastern corner of the lake. In English, Schiphol translates to “Ships Hell”, a reference to many ships supposedly lost in the lake. When the lake was reclaimed, however, no shipwrecks were found.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another possible origin of the name is the word “scheepshaal”.

A scheepshaal is a ditch or small canal in which ships would be towed from one lake to another.

A third explanation would be that the name derived from the words schip hol.

This is a low-lying area of land (hol) from where wood would be obtained to build ships.

There is quite a lengthy entry about Schipol on the Wikipedia website, and even though we fly reasonably often, one thing I didn’t know previously about the airport is:

The Rijksmuseum operates an annex at the airport, offering a small overview of both classical and contemporary art. Admission to the exhibits is free.

In summer 2010, Schiphol Airport Library opened alongside the museum, providing passengers access to a collection of 1,200 books (translated into 29 languages) by Dutch authors on subjects relating to the country’s history and culture.  The 89.9 m2 (968 sq ft) library offers e-books and music by Dutch artists and composers that can be downloaded free of charge to a laptop or mobile device.

I also learned: “The Schiphol air traffic control tower, with a height of 101 m (331 ft), was the tallest in the world when constructed in 1991. Schiphol is geographically one of the world’s lowest major commercial airports. The entire airport is below sea level. The lowest point sits at 3.4 m (11 ft) below sea level: 1.4 m (4.5 ft) below the Dutch Normaal Amsterdams Peil (NAP). The runways are around 3 m (9.8 ft) below NAP.

Wikipedia / Schiphol Airport / Province North Holland / The Netherlands.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 27, 2019

Amsterdam, The City On The Amstel…

Oops! Today’s post went out without text (which I type separately into a word document because the WordPress programme sometimes decides to delete text just entered when you try to update) Apparently my brain melted in the recent heat and I forgot to add the text to the post. My apologies for the brain fade.
In today’s post from my 2017 visit to the Garderen Sand Sculpture exhibition i am in the painted “klompen” (clog) section that features Amsterdam. Wikipedia tells us: “Amsterdam is the capital and most populous city of the Netherlands. Located in the province of North Holland, Amsterdam’s name derives from Amstelredamme, indicative of the city’s origin around a dam in the river Amstel. Originating as a small fishing village in the late 12th century, Amsterdam became one of the most important ports in the world in the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th century and became the leading centre for finance and trade. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the city expanded, and many new neighbourhoods and suburbs were planned and built. The 17th-century canals of Amsterdam and the 19–20th century Defence Line of Amsterdam are on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Sloten, annexed in 1921 by the municipality of Amsterdam, is the oldest part of the city, dating to the 9th century.

Wikipedia / Amsterdam /Province North Holland / The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 26, 2019

Heading South To North Brabant…

Following yesterday’s post, and following the decorated “klompen” (clogs) in the 2017 Garderen Sand Sculpture exhibition I’m now in North Brabant. North Brabant also unofficially called Brabant, is a province in the south of the Netherlands, Limburg to the east, Zeeland to the west, and Belgium to the south. The northern border follows the Meuse westward to its mouth in the Hollands Diep strait, part of the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta. Urbanization is at the center of the province, where the ‘kite’ (the Brabantse Stedenrij Breda, Tilburg, Eindhoven and ‘s-Hertogenbosch) is located, the rest of the province has a more rural character. The province has preserved some of its scenic nature well. Like most of the Netherlands, North Brabant is mostly flat but nearly every part of North Brabant is above sea level; therefore, there are not as many canals as in the lower parts of The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 25, 2019

Limburg Province In The South…

Limburg is the southernmost of the 12 provinces of the Netherlands. It is in the southeastern part of the country, stretched out from the north, where it touches the province of Gelderland, to the south, where it internationally borders Belgium. Its northern part has the North Brabant province to its west. Its long eastern boundary is the international border with the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Much of the west border runs along the River Maas, bordering the Flemish province of Limburg, and a small part of the Walloon province of Liège. On the south end, it has borders with the Flemish exclave of Voeren and its surrounding part of Liège, Wallonia. The Vaalserberg is on the extreme south-eastern point, marking the tripoint of Netherlands, Germany and Belgium.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 24, 2019

Valkenburg In Limburg…

The Garderen decorative ‘klompen” (clogs) have moved to the province of Limberg in this post. Wikipedia tells us: “Valkenburg is located in the South Limburg hills and has a strong tourist character. The historic city center with many catering establishments, the surrounding hill country and a large number of tourist attractions are the main attractions. Valkenburg is located in a valley formed by the river Geul. The city center of Valkenburg consists of two parts: the historic core and the shopping area.

The medieval core of Valkenburg is small. It comprises a more or less triangular area, bounded on the north side by the southern branch of the Geul. The first part of the name Valkenburg probably refers to medieval falconry, which was popular with the nobility in the Middle Ages. The toponym burg was originally the Middle Dutch word for fortress, but it also has the meaning of castle or castle and of city . The first written mention of the name Valkenburg dates from 1041 .

Wikipedia / Valkenburg / Limburg Province / The Netherlands.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 23, 2019

Groningen, The Province And The Capital…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Our next stop whilst traveling along the line of decorated fiberglass “klompen” (clogs) in Garderen’s Sand Sculpture exhibition, is Groningen. Wikipedia tells me: “Groningen is the name of this province as well as it’s capital city in the north-eastern corner of the Netherlands.

As the largest city in the north of the Netherlands, Groningen is an old city of more than 950 years.

It was the regional power in this area of the country, a semi-independent city-state and member of the German Hanseatic League.

Groningen is a university city, with an estimated 31,000 students at the University of Groningen, and an estimated 29,000 at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences.

The city was founded at the northernmost point of the Hondsrug area.

The oldest document referring to Groningen’s existence dates from 1040.

However, the city already existed long before then: the oldest archaeological traces found are believed to stem from the years 3950–3720 BC, although the first major settlement in Groningen has been traced back to the 3rd century AD.

In the 13th century, when Groningen was an important trade centre, its inhabitants built a city wall to underline its authority.

The city had a strong influence on the surrounding lands and made its dialect a common tongue.

The most influential period of the city was the end of the 15th century, when the nearby province of Friesland was administered from Groningen. During these years, the Martinitoren, then 127 metres (417 feet) tall, was built; it loomed over the city. The city’s independence ended in 1536, when it chose to accept Emperor Charles V, the Habsburg ruler of the other Netherlands, as its overlord.In 1594, Groningen, until then held by Spain, was captured by a Dutch and English force led by Maurice of Nassau. Soon afterwards the city and the province joined the Republic of the Seven United Provinces.

In 1614, the University of Groningen was founded, initially only for religious education.The city did not escape the devastation of World War II. In particular, the main square, the Grote Markt, was largely destroyed in April 1945 in the Battle of Groningen. However, the Martinitoren, its church, the Goudkantoor, and the city hall were not damaged. The battle lasted several days.”

Wikipedia / Groningen / Province / City / The Netherlands

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 22, 2019

Gelderland: Host Province…

During  my visit to the 2017 Garderen Sand Sculpture exhibition I found that they had made new large fiberglass klompen, and commissioned artists to paint them with the theme of “The Provinces of the Netherlands”. The last “klompen” (clog) from extras provided from host province Gelderland, is simply entitled: “Gelderland”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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