Local Heart, Global Soul

February 23, 2017

Taking Practical Over Pretty… Even If It’s Not So Posh.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next display that caught my eye at the Air Force and War Museum in Texel is also one that I didn’t expect to be present in this kind of museum.

A closer look revealed it’s aviation connection, because in fact this porcelain is a tea set used by KLM in either it’s Business or First Class service.

There are not just porcelain cups, saucers and plates, but also milk jugs, napkin rings,  salt and pepper set, a small tray for other condiments.

Together with KLM engraved glassware, dinner at thirty thousand feet is indeed a far posher affair at the front of the aircraft than it is with the crowded masses and their plastic implements at the back.

Himself and I buy one lottery ticket per month… if we ever win big I am certain that a nice trip to New Zealand in Business Class would be a wonderful treat.

Until then we will go with the famous quote made by Victor Kiam, who was also famous for the catchphrase, “I liked the shaver so much, I bought the company“. The company in question was of course Remmington, and when Kiam took over they were in trouble  so he  told employees that costs would have to be cut to save jobs and keep the company from folding.

Executives who has been used to flying Business were required to change to Economy, an action that Victor Kiam led by example with the famous quote: ” After all, the back end of the plane arrives pretty much the same time as the front“. The plates may be plastic in economy and given the choice I would love to be wined and dined with a service such as this, but when reality sets in I will take practical over pretty any day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 22, 2017

KLM Is At “Home” In The Sky, … Bottoms Up!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Leaving the informational movie theatre in Texel’s Air Force and War Museum, Himself and I make our way into a large hall.

The date was Good Friday 2016 and we were taking a little break away from the rest of the family, who were off with friends and other kids.

Just inside the entrance to the hall is a very distinctive display cabinet, filled with of all things, Delft’s blue porcelain houses.

Naturally I am curious as to why on earth this is in a museum dedicated to aircraft and war memorabilia, so went to read the information board next to it. From this I learned that these are:

KLM Delft Blue Houses. The houses, numbered 1 to 94, are filled with Bols Dutch gin and are handed out at the end of intercontinental flights to passenger flying Business Class. House “94” is a copy of the “Oudheidkamer” in Den Burg.

This was the first copy and it was donated on 7 October 2013 to the Mayor of Texel, Francine Giskes.

During this ceremony, all of the houses exhibited here were promised by Mrs Hartman on behalf of KLM, to former President of the board of this Museum, Theo Whitte.”

Unfortunately house number “94” is not labelled and nor are any of the others, so it’s difficult to tell which one it is, especially since the shelves are not symmetrically spaced in the lower half of the cabinet.

By just counting from left to right (as logically as possible) house “94” could be the first house on the very bottom row but I am not certain if the houses are even in numerical order, it is possible that since this house is especially designated that it is either the house at the very top or at top right of the display.

Both are too high up to see if there are any labels, and sadly I am not familiar with the historic buildings of Den Burg to recognise it.

These little bottles are beautiful, I would love to own this collection (certainly not for the gin, but for the bottles) and it’s an unexpected place to find them since Delft is more in my back yard than Texel’s. I have no clue if this is a tradition that KLM still follow, if so, there are some very lucky owners of these lovely little bottles around the world.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 13, 2016

Napoleon Fixes A Weighty European Problem…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Rijksmuseum has an impressive range of objects on show, and the central cabinets in some of the galleries give one surprise after another.

In this post I am combining the contents of two such diaplay cabinets, one of decorated plates and the other of the first offical standard Europen weights and measures.

I knew that the Nether-Lands (Low Lands) had once (and I think, actually more than once) been an area that combined the current county with what is now modern day Belgium, but I never knew that Luxemburg was included as well at any point.

I also did not know that it was Napoleon that introduced the standardised European metric system… a system now used world wide with the exception of only three countries: United States, Myanmar  and Liberia.

It just goes to show, you can learn something new every day!

18 plates, each decorated with a Netherlandish province“, hard-paste porcelain, gold leaf Paris 1822. painted decoration: monogrammist RD (possibly Raimond Dufour 1784-1847)
These plates refect the period then the Netherlands and Belgium together formed the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815-1830). The kingdom consisted of 17 provinces plus the grand duchy of Luxemburg. The gold decortion is in the neo-clasical style. On the upper edge are the arms of each province in gold on the blue border: the arms of the United Kingdom of The Netherlands are on the lower side. Today the Netherlands consists of 12 provinces.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Weights and Measures
In the past, units of weight and measurement differed from place to place. Napoleon decided to enforce the use of a single systen: the metre, the kilogram and the litre. The precise values were estabished at a confernce held in Paris in 1799. To prevent discrepancies, the Dutch (and other) delegates were given this iron metre and a copper kilogram. The eight Dutch additional standard volume measures date from 1820.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

June 1, 2016

Barometers and Bed Chambers… Oh La La !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Before I leave the 17th century French Influences gallery of the Rijksmuseum, I want to take a look at a large four poster bed that has the most intricate embroidered covers and bed linen.

There is a perspex screen around it, I suppose not only to keep young visitors from jumping on it or older folks from taking a rest, but I suppose more to keep dust off it, after all cleaning a very large heavily embroidered five hundred year old bedspread would make any dry cleaner extremely nervous.

There are ornate golden statues around the bed, candlesticks maybe ? and a canopy around the four poster which is also heavily decorated.

Behind glass on a wall nearby there is a heavily carved piece, a frame (I think in ivory) for what I think is a glass barometer tube that runs to a bulb of mercury at the base.

The detail that has been achieved within such a small piece has to be seen to be believed, there is even a fully three dimensional coat of arms complete with rampant lions at the top of it.

There are also more examples of Delfts work here too, tiled panels, figurines and pots of all sizes  complete the rest of my tour here. Even though the Dutch were at war with France at the time that many of these items were made, it is a relief that the French influences still made it across the border, otherwise our culture would have been poorer for it. I know that the Rijksmuseum is a huge place and there is much to take in, but even a short visit if you are ever in Amsterdam to see a few of these things up close would be a few hours exceedingly well spent.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

May 30, 2016

The French Court’s Influence Reached Far Over Enemy Borders…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This might be the Rijksmuseum gallery that has everything to do with the French Court, but many of the objects here are Dutch.

The influence on Fashion that France throughout Europe was so powerful that it crossed national borders  with friends and foes alike, and soaked into the fabric of society.

Even here in Amsterdam, at the heart of one of France’s foremost enemies that influence was no less powerful, the information panel telling me:

King-Stadtholder William III and Mary Stuart
The “disaster year” 1672, when the Netherlands was attacked on all sides, marked the beginning of a series of successes for Prince William III of Orange (1650-1702).

He was appointed Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic and commander of the army, he repulsed the enemy and a few years later he married Mary Stuart, daughter of King James of England.

In 1689 William and Mary became the first joint king and queen of England, Scotland and Ireland.

From then on William played a leading role in the European political arena. Protestant William’s fiercest adversary was the Catholic king of France, Louis XIV.

Their power struggle remained undecided, yet when it came to the arts the impact of the “Sun King” was indisputable. Louis XIV’s court style was mirrored in the court of William and Mary. Daniel Marot, a Huguenot (Protestant) designer from Paris who fled France on religious grounds in 1686, adapted the style of Versailles to a Dutch scale. one of his most prestigious designs was for the interior of Het Loo Palace in Apeldoorn.

Marot’s influence can also be seen in Delft pottery through the interest of the court, Mary was very partial to porcelain and earthenware thus its popularity and the demand for it expanded enormously.”

Bust of King-Stadtholder William III“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1695-1700 attributed to De Metaale Pot (Lambertus van Eenhoorn). (Leading photograph in this post) “After De Metaale Pot hired a French modeller, it succeeded in becoming the first pottery factory in the Netherlands to produce large sculptural earthenware objects. The modeller’s influence is visible in the way in which the drapery folds around the shoulders of this portrait are rendered.”
Bust of Mary Stuart“, tin glazed earthenware, Delft circa 1680-1690 by De Grieksche A(Samuel van Eenhoorn).
That William and Mary were eternalized in tin-glazed earthenware is highly appropriate. Mary was particularly fond of this material and de Grieksche A was his her favourite supplier. Even so these busts were not made from them on commission, but served as decorative objects on the house of a loyal Orangist family.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Candlestick“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1680-1685 attributed to De Grieksche A(Samuel van Eenhoorn).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Salt Cellar“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1680-1690 attributed to De Grieksche A(Samuel van Eenhoorn).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Dish“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1680-1695 attributed to De Grieksche A(Adrianus Kocx) and “Teapot“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1680-1690 attributed to De Metaale Pot (Lambertus Cleffius)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Flower Pyrimid“,  tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1692-1700 attributed to De Metaale Pot (Lambertus van Eenhoorn)
Costly cut flowers could be placed in each spout of this flower pyrimid, which is built up of seperate elements. The model of this tall, stacked flower vase originated at the court of William and Mary, his consort who was passionately interested in flower agement, porcelain and tin-glazed earthernware.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Pair of Candlesticks“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1690-1700 attributed to De Grieksche A(Adrianus Kocx).
Although the form of these candlesticks resembles Dutch silver models, their ornamentation makes a Chinese impression. the tem is even decorated withe made-up Chinese characters“.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Tea caddy with the arms of the Zinzendorf family“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1685-1695 attributed to De Grieksche A(Adrianus Kocx).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Three plaques fom a column“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1690 designed by Daniel Marot (1661-1752) and made by De Grieksche A(Adrianus Kocx).
The decoration on these plaques was based n designs by Damiel Marot, who may have played a pivotal role in furnishing and decorating the Water Gallery at Hampton Court Palace.The designs were not executed on the more usual smaller tiles, but on larger planes. Making such large plaques must have presented an enormous technical challenge. Each column was originally four or four-and-a-half-plaques high.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Two decorated jugs“, tin-glazed earthernware Delft circa 1695-1720 attributed to De Roos and De Witte Ster (Dammas Hofdijck and Jacobus de Lange).
Between 1705 and 1711, both the De Roos and De Witte Ster pottery factory factories were in the hands of the same owners, there must have been and lively exchange of motifs and painter, for it is not always possible to distinguish between the objects made in either factory during these years.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

Blog at WordPress.com.