Local Heart, Global Soul

March 23, 2019

Maranatha, A Floating Roof And Awesome Brickwork…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sometimes whilst I was on full Medical Leave (before I went back to work) Himself would just drop me off  somewhere interesting in the city in my wheelchair, leave me to take photographs of various things in a small radius for a while.

After an hour he would come and pick me up again.

This got me out of the house for a small amount of time, away from the walls of home where I was confined due to surgery, recovery, constant pain and heavy medication.

Of course there was a price to pay afterwards for my little outings and fresh air, even with an attachment on the wheelchair where my leg could be positioned straight and raised out in front of me.

Extra medication is always needed afterwards, which morphine based, works as needed but is not ideal for your body. Sometimes it’s needed for your mental health. On this occasion I did a series of photographs in the little street where the former Tekel Air Travel Bureau was. (see blog post here:  “Pigs Might Not Fly But Apparently Dogs Did… “).

I was surprised and delighted to see a small information board on the street by the entrance, telling me about some of the history of the Church.  As is often the case when an information board is in multiple languages, the information given in the “extra” languages is often shorted to fit the space, whilst the text in the native country language contains extra snippets.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Such is the case here.  Both before and after the English language text are extra pieces of information from the Dutch text.

Translated from Dutch it reads: The Maranatha church is located on part of the former  “Sperrgebiet” (Prohibited / restricted Area) of the Second World War.

The houses that stood there were, after the liberation were found to have been stripped of all wood and other useful materials, so were ripe for demolition.”

Next comes the information written in both Dutch and English:

The wooden roof structure of this church was designed by Swiss engineer Emil Staudacher as a prototype for use in temporary churches to be built in the devastated German cities. 

It arrived in kit form on a train from Zurich and was integrated into a design by Dutch architect  Frits Eschauzier (1889-1957). The temporary churches project was initiated by German architect Otto Bartning. Over forty of the churches still exist in places across Germany.”

Lastly comes the additional translate from Dutch snippet: “They have the same rose window and the same small window in the façade. Due to the continuing row of windows on the side, it looks like the roof is floating.

Bartning positioned the entrance on the side. The ceremonial front door was added at the request of the Hague church councilors.”

I was first drawn to the church because of the quirky brick construction. These fortified walls with buttresses reinforce the outside walls. interestingly these brick “out layers” are uniquely joined to the main building, seemingly by a method as simple as splicing the brickwork of the two together. It gives for a very unconventional bricklaying technique I think, barely a straight line to be seen in some sections. I find this to be some pretty awesome brickwork!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) This is the row of windows along the side wall, I’m not so convinced about the floating window idea…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) Now HERE is some mega awesome brickwork!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 27, 2019

Bubble Glass Windows… Wait A Minute…

One quirky feature of Zierikzee is that in random places in the city centre, I found these “interesting” doors. They all have a large balloon-like window in them, which gives a quirky shape and style. All of them are dark and mega reflective so I first assumed that they were some sort of dark security glass, but closer inspection on a few of them revealed the faint lines of wooden panels so I will take a random guess and say that all of these are wooden. None of them had letter slots in or above the bulging section so they are also not letterboxes. therefore I give up, I have no clue as to the function of these unless they are purely decorative. I spotted at least half a dozen of these and each time they make me smile. Fooling me into thinking they were glass gives these doors an air of fragility that is apparently a complete sham, so the joke is on me because I was completely taken in.These are quirky, apparently only decorative, and distinctive, I can laugh at myself, What’s not to love?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 8, 2018

Something For Everyone…

One thing that we couldn’t miss whilst visiting Cathedral Square in Christchurch, New Zealand, were the quirky seats dotted around the area. These were green (artificial) grassy cube shaped seats, a fun and colourful solution to public seating. On the site of several demolished buildings, a short distance away, the first barrier separating the footpath from the car park also doubled as a seating area. There were of course the older, traditional seats that form a square around each of several large trees too, and the “historic” seats in the general form of piano and it’s keys, that have been around as long as the giant chess set has been in existence, so in essence: something for everyone.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 10, 2018

Sheep On The Line!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I are taking an early morning tour of Christchurch’s, (New Zealand) central city to see for ourselves how the rebuild process if going on after the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes.

Whilst looking around Manchester Street we see a tram parked up at the end of High Street and I spot something quirky.

Himself obligingly does a “U” turn and I go in for a closer look.

At the end of the track are buffers: metal boxes filled with concrete, a necessary safety feature and probably a standard fixture.

These fixtures however are far from standard: they have been made to look like sheep and painted in bright colours.

It’s a fun and quirky way to disguise a mundane utilitarian object, well not really even “disguise” because these draw attention to themselves, but in a totally different way to how they might as plain lumps of metal filled with concrete.

I think they are delightful, they avoid the usual problem of being blocks that might be targets for messy graffiti, will amuse kids and adults alike with their whimsical tails, ears and faces and legs and serve their safety purpose as well.

I think these are wonderful… there can be no missing these “sheep” on the lines!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 1, 2018

This Fish Gets A Thumbs Up…

Filed under: ART,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

Whilst driving around Wellington, New Zealand, I saw this little fish and chip shop. Look at the sign: I mean, a fish wearing a hat leaps out of the water to give you a wink and a thumbs up… What’s not to like?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 26, 2018

The Funniest Fish Faces…

Filed under: ART,Mural,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Directly next to the “hippopotamus” building of my yesterday’s post, we find this adventurous mural. It’s huge… the fish swim in a large school that covers the entire length of the building. Traffic behind us meant that pulling over wasn’t really an option, and the rain was getting harder. I had to compete with the windscreen wipers for space to see out of the windscreen: this is one funny mural, someone with an excellent sense of humor painted these fish. Wellington, New Zealand is excelling itself with beautiful murals and the decorative arts…Kudos!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 24, 2018

Bright, Humorous And Quirky!

Filed under: ART,Mural,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

Having visited the excellent Brickworld LEGO exhibition in Te Papa, rain or no rain, Family Kiwidutch decide to take a small look around Wellington City. We don’t have to drive far before we see this mural. As a “collector” of these kind of images, I quickly tried to get a decent close-up. This mural is bright, humorous and quirky… right up my street!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 5, 2018

Side-Stepping The Image, But Not The Issue…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Just before Christmas 2017, Family Kiwidutch visited Singapore, and on this occasion took in the views from the “Singapore Flyer” observation wheel.

Himself sat out the actual ride, heights being very much not his thing, but was pleased to wait for us below.

As usual I was busy with my camera, looking for new things to photograph and enjoy. One of these things is the delightful way that people take existing items and turn them into something else.

For example, here at the base of the Flyer, is a wide passageway that features quite a few large columns.

I delight in the fact that in this multi-cultural and multi-religious State, there appears to be no controversy or objection to actually naming the various religious events.

The banners say “Merry Christmas” rather than “Happy Holidays”, there are “Happy New Year” banners even though a vast majority of the population in Singapore will celebrate the Chinese New Year (16th February 2018) instead.

I have no problem to promote special days in the calendar of religions other than my own either. I need assistance to get to work, so my work pays for a taxi. Both of my regular drivers are Muslim and the one who has been driving me for a long time is a friend outside of our working hours.

I have no problem to talk about religion to them, we respect that each of our faiths is different, but peace and respect are central. I will let God judge everything else.

We have celebrated Eid (the feast that celebrates the end of Ramadan) with them and learned a lot about the traditions that are important to them. Here in Singapore the columns have been decorated in Santa’s and figures from the Nutcracker, the rain / shade umbrellas outside are decorated with tinsel and baubles.

There is even a large Christmas image on the floor that has a strange 3-D effect.

It was funny because  waiting for a small group of people to pass and to get a better shot, I noticed that only one person was willing to walk directly across the image, everyone else took an extended side route.

I think it was a case of your mind telling you that of course it was flat, the image is only an illusion, but our eyes rebel and in the end we prefer to side on the caution that our eyes dictate and side-step just in case.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

March 4, 2018

Sitting On Big, Bold, Beautiful Forms…

Here’s another “arty” type post from the Singapore Flyer building. In the area between the ticket office and the place where you go up to go onto the observation wheel, is a seating area. Of course I would not be featuring them if they were “just seats”. These ones are bright and quirky, and in a design that catches the eye. I dare presume that they are also seen by young children and toddlers as excellent climbing equipment, or for that game where the child feels compelled to complete a full circle of something, possibly holding the hand of a parent: similar to walking the length of low walls.
It’s not just a kid magnet either, plenty of adults appear to have made themselves comfortable too. Most of all it is quirky, and who doesn’t love quirky? In art I am more a lover of texture, line and pattern. Others art lovers like these too but prefer big, bold, beautiful forms, full of colour. To those people, this post is especially dedicated.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 29, 2017

One For The Road… Well, Better Advised For After It.

Filed under: ART,PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design,THE NETHERLANDS,ZEELAND (Province) — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and I have an ongoing “thing’ with some friends who we consider more as family than friends and visa versa.

Whenever we travel somewhere new we try and bring something the local cuisine back for the other family.

On a few occasions it isn’t possible but it can be surprising what we manage to pick up, be it home made goodies from road side stalls to guesses made in foreign languages in regional supermarkets.

Himself and my friends hubby are both keen connoisseurs of dark beers: apparently these are called stouts and porters and the darker the colour the happier our menfolk often are.

We have become experts in wrapping bottles so that they don’t break in checked in baggage on long flights and in attempting to guess what interesting looking packages are in supermarkets.

Our food and beverage swaps also extend to new areas of the Netherlands so when spending Easter in Zeeland and finding this beer it gave us a giggle and we immediately decided to bring some back as our food swap souvenir gift.

The reason for the chuckles were because although Zeeland is a very conservative part of the Netherlands, they are is obviously not without a sense of humour.

On the label is a funny photograph of a very traditionally dressed Zeeuwsch lady driving a very untraditional mode of transport: a large motorcycle.

The name of the beer is “Zwarte Lola’ (Black Lola) which refers to the fact that this is a dark beer and again, it sounds more heavy metal than classical music if I was to make an analogy of musical genres with regional stereotypes.

I have never have been a beer drinker, but apparently it wasn’t bad, the taste testers verdict was that whilst it did not rank amongst the very best they have ever tasted, it was far from terrible and had there been more going, it would have been quickly accepted.

I love it when product manufacturers come up with quirky, imaginative label ideas.

This one shows that the locals can poke fun at themselves and stand out from the crowd.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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