Local Heart, Global Soul

September 20, 2020

Déco Too, But Cleaner And Less Fussy…

This  next set of shop windows in Leiden is also of an Art Déco style, but (in my opinion) cleaner and less fussy in execution than the other ones in yesterday’s post. I have to confess that this one is a favourite of mine… love it!

Primera” is the actual name of the shop here, I’m guessing that there may be a conservation law that protects the original “P.J. van Kampenhout” name across the top, since it is part of the entire Art Déco frontage, and I’m delighted that it’s being kept in such good shape, not just left to fade out like I have seen on some other buildings. The owner of this building clearly values the heritage of the building here.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

June 17, 2020

Natural Light Through Glass…

Following yesterday’s post, I am standing in the stair area of the Queen’s/King’s waiting room at Hollandspoor train station in The Hague. There is was looks to be an identical skylight to the one next door in the Royal Lavatory, an important source of light in an age before electricity was available and still a beautiful decorative piece after it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 16, 2020

Stair Glass, Colour Change…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I spent Sunday of “Monumentendag” 2019 taking a tour around Hollandspoor train station.

This is weekend where for one or two days various historical, and other buildings are open to the public.

Of course people can visit a train station but this section is special, it’s the Queen’s/King’s waiting room.

Used in a time when train travel was the height of modern technology, this waiting room was in fact barely used by the Dutch Royal family, instead being the first point of entry for the heads of other Royal houses, heads of State, various dignitaries, diplomats and VIP’s.

Even more than this, the Royal waiting rooms were a showcase of Dutch workmanship and trades, a conspicuous display of elements that could be ordered for the visitor if they liked what they saw. Needless to say, every square centimetre was decorated. There is a beautiful wall of stained glass at the side of the staircase, where it makes a right angle turn  and descends further.

It was a brilliantly warm sunny day, and in a way for some strange reason it made it harder to photograph. You can see from the last photograph that the shield is yellow, but in the photograph above it, it looks red.  Except for the smaller pieces on the side that could be seen from the side of the stairs, it was also difficult to get close to the main section because moving towards it meant descending the stairs and then looking steeply up at it. I let the zoom do most of the work.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 12, 2020

Beautiful Illumination…

Following yesterday’s post, the Royal Lavatory in Hollandspoor train Station was covered by a stunning skylight. It’s also supplemented by an electric light, but no lamp could radiate beauty like this example of leaded glass.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 6, 2020

Modern Glass… Or Not?

The Chapel above the “Kloosterbrouwerij Haagsche Broeder”! (Kloister Brewery The Hague Brothers) in The Hague, sports some unexpected treasures. The stained glass windows are a delight of light and colour. One thing I am however unsure about is if I should categorise this as a modern stained glass window or an old one? Of course it’s naturally not medieval but it’s also not (I think) what might be categorised as of the “Victorian” age when many stained glass windows were made. Maybe “Vintage”  or “Traditional Modern” would be a good in-between point, since it’s also not modern in the sense of a completely abstract window?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 5, 2020

Colourful And Beautiful…

The private Chapel above the “Kloosterbrouwerij Haagsche Broeder“(Kloister Brewery The Hague Brothers) has a wall of stained glass windows as well as the Rose Window at the end. They are colourful and beautiful…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 4, 2020

Petals Of The Rose Window…

The “Kloosterbrouwerij Haagsche Broeder”! (Kloister Brewery The Hague Brothers) has a private chapel above it which was open to visitors on “Monumentendag”. At one end of the chapel is a stunning stained glass rose window.

Wanting to know about the term “Rose Window”,  Wikipedia, told me: “Rose window is often used as a generic term applied to a circular window, but is especially used for those found in churches of the Gothic architectural style that are divided into segments by stone mullions and tracery.
The term rose window was not used before the 17th century and according to the Oxford English Dictionary, among other authorities, comes from the English flower name rose.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 18, 2020

The King’s Ballroom: Look Up!

Catching our attention in yesterday’s post, the King’s Ballroom boasts a skylight that immediately captures the attention of whoever enters. I was visiting during the 2019 ‘Nationale Monumentendag’ sites.(Open day for Historic Places), and as an enthusiast of old architecture, the Hague’s Sociëteit “De Vereeniging” (Private Member’s Club) this sort of thing is exactly up my street!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 27, 2020

Stained Glass And Open And Closed Doors…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Whilst taking part in the Dutch annual ‘Nationale Monumentendag’ (Open days for National Historic Places sites) , I was able to visit ‘Freemason’s House’ in the Hague.

Of course not all of the building was open to the public.

A small hallway lead to a view of a small garden at the back, and on te way there I caught sight of another room, screened off.

My attention was not on the screens however, rather on the stained glass panels visible above them.

These were also visible via a high glass window in one of the rooms I had already been in, so between the two shots I see a group of six stained glass windows apparently full of designs, decoration elements, symbolic references and patterns pertaining to the Freemason’s movement. The little garden in the back was closed to the public, it still looked inviting on the warm summer’s day visit during the summer of 2019. It’s an interesting glimpse into the public/private aspects of the organisation, and a reminder that you see what they want you to see, and many doors remain still closed.

(Below)A glimpse of the garden outside at the back…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below)Another shot of the garden…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) A side shot of stained glass mostly shut off by screens…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 26, 2017

The History Of Baarle In Glass…

In my final post about the stained glass at the “den Engel Hotel” (the Angel Hotel) I cover as many of the reception rooms as I can reach, photographing the glass panels as I go. The windows are lovely, each theme and item telling a story integral to the history of Baarle-Nassau / Baarle-Hertog and the many stories that have been woven into that history over the centuries. A lot of thought has gone into making these beautiful windows. I applaud the idea, I love the result. This is a hotel clearly interested in it’s history and place within it’s community.(still with previously “windows” resized photos)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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