Local Heart, Global Soul

August 22, 2018

Letters and “Best” Handwriting…

Filed under: Architectural Detail,ART,Landmarks,My Reference Library,Stone carved — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Old Post Office in Cathedral Square is one of Christchurch’s most well known landmarks.

I remember the days when I was a teenager, lining up to get stamps for letters, with other people who where there to post letters, aerograms (my father used those for years!) cards and parcels.

Email has I think, done a huge blow to the art form of sending what we now call “snail mail”.

I try and make a habit of sending postcards from places we visit, and yes, it takes time to scribble out messages.

I try and make it easier by using pre-printed address labels but I find that as time goes on there is one major difficulty that I could never have envisioned possible all those years ago.

That is: I am getting less and less used to writing by hand. I have three handwriting styles: the first is my “ultra neat” style for special occasion stuff, the second is my “still-neat-but-far more casual” (most used) and then there is the style I used most during my student days: the flat out scrawl that only I could (mostly) read, born of the days when teachers revealed blackboards full of text that needed to be copied down before class ended or before it was wiped out of existence for the next lot of text that the teacher was writing.

My children looked in disbelief when I told them this once. I asked how they managed. My daughter laughingly pulled out her phone and showed me photograph after photograph of texts on whiteboards, all she had to do was point-and-click.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gone are the days of serious cramp in your fingers as you tried to keep writing frantically before time or text was lost. Or going around your classmates asking “Anyone get the last four lines? Please can I get a copy? Yes? Cheers!” Vital instructions were often in those last four lines. Assignment details and the like.

Later this Post Office had a large philatelic section, where First Day Covers of stamps could be bought, and folders full of beautiful stamps could be viewed.

I have always viewed stamps as miniature works of art and loved a visit here to take a look.

The main work of the central city Post Office moved half a dozen blocks from here into a massive new building I (am guessing) somewhere in the 1980’s.

The Old Post Office here in the Square seems to have survived the earthquakes reasonably well. A lot of work has been done, and it’s clear that there is still a lot yet to do.

That said, I am relieved that it’s still here. With the historic Regent theatre, The Press Building, numerous other theatres now completely gone and the Cathedral damaged, it’s nice to see that one of Christchurch cities beautiful old landmarks has survived. Like our “best” handwriting, it hangs in there by a thread. I hope to one day return to look at folders of stamps and enjoy the interior.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I took close ups of this section because it’s a rare view: other buildings obscured it before so I have never seen these windows before.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 31, 2017

Remembering Heroic Actions…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The former school alongside the former Stathuis (Town Hall) in Baarle-Hertog  has the war memorial located on the outside of one of it’s walls.

This memorial commemorates also the actions of Miet Verhoven, Gerardus Gerritsen and Adriaan van Gestel who made the ultimate sacrifice in their efforts to help downed pilots back to safe territory.

This is a beautiful, poignant statue that gives a lasting memory to ordinary people caught up in horrific events far beyond their own making but who stood up, stepped out and showed amazing acts of bravery.

They make the ultimate sacrifice and deserve nothing less something beautiful to remember them by.

My only regret is that this statue is not located on the Main Street of Baarle where it could be even more appreciated.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Monument for those Executed

This monument is made in 1949  by L. van Der Meer in memory of the three inhabitants of Baarle who were executed on 10th September 1944 : Maria Verhoeven, Gerardus Gerritsen and Adriaan van Gestel.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 11, 2017

Simplicity And Detail Together…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Leaving “de Waag” (Weigh house) I start looking at the left hand side of Gouda’s Stadhuis.

Covered with windows typical of the mid-1400’s, the red and white wooden shutters with their ironwork attachments, make a colourful as well as practical use.

There are also later edition pieces here too. The first is a set of diamond shaped art pieces on near the end of the Staduis close to the scaffold which is called: “Salomonsoordeel” (Solomon’s judgment). Wikipedia put it better than I could:

“1 Kings 3:16–28 Two mothers living in the same house, each the mother of an infant son, came to Solomon. One of the babies had died, and each claimed the remaining boy as her own.

Calling for a sword, Solomon declared his judgment: the baby would be cut in two, each woman to receive half.

One mother did not contest the ruling, declaring that if she could not have the baby then neither of them could, but the other begged Solomon, “Give the baby to her, just don’t kill him!”

The king declared the second woman the true mother, as a mother would even give up her baby if that was necessary to save its life. This judgment became known throughout all of Israel and was considered an example of profound wisdom.’

Also on this side of the Stadhuis is an arched stone doorway with and heavy arched ironwork studded door. At the cornerstone of the stone arch is a little surprise: a stone carving of a whale, complete with water spout!

At the base of the stone door way are carvings that look a bit like sword handles. Close by is a water pipe, unusual too because part of it is in the shape of a face.

A little further on again you can find a large metal ring embedded into the stonework. Probably for the hitching of horses but who knows? Simplicity and detail together make a beautiful façade.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: Judgement of Solomon / Bible

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