Local Heart, Global Soul

December 13, 2019

Bronze And Stone…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) Ken of “Geest in Ontwikkeling”, Frans calksteen, Euville (French chalkstone from Euville) 2007. (Translation: “Developing Mind”, French Limestone from Euville, 2007.)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) (Bust) “Kees”. Brons, 2002. (translation: Bust / portrait of Kees ( Note: Kees is a mans name in Dutch). Bronze, 2002)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) “Veilig”, bruin albast 2011. (translation: “Safe”, brown alabaster, 2011)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Below) Verbinding in vrijheid, bruine albast, 2006. (translation: “Connection in freedom”, brown alabaster, 2006

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 12, 2019

Rocking That Stone…

These are some of the “Parels” (Pearls) weekend sculptures I discovered on my visits…  Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 11, 2019

Record Keeping In Of Stone…

It is excellent to find another artist who is keeping a record of their work. This time the art concerns sculptural pieces, they may be commissions or items made purely for the enjoyment of the artist. Regardless if the works are kept by the artist or not, a record of the pieces can inspire and show progress in skill. Here are a few records in of stone!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 10, 2019

New Lease Of Life … As Art!

Following on from yesterday’s post, I am visiting a sculptor’s work during one of the 2019 “Parels” (Pearls) weekends. This is the piece that was in the “advertisement / guide” booklet that shows off all of the Parels exhibitors, and I suspect that, like me, many visitors were curious to see this up close. There are two, very similar pieces in style here and I know that one of them is called “Möbius serpentijn”, I am now just not sure which of the two it is. (my bad, apologies to the artist). I’ve zoomed in on some parts so that you can see how every day objects have been given a new lease of life… as art!

(Below) Möbius serpentijn, 2019  (Sorry. I have no translation for this title).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 22, 2019

More Art Lurks…

One of the delights of attending the “Parels” (Pearls) weekends in the Hague, is discovering beautiful art and various collections in private homes around the various neighbourhoods around the city. The event runs for a weekend in each neighbourhood, participants can choose to open their home for Saturday, Sunday, or both.  I have seen many people on bikes cycling from one house on the map to another, they will probably manage to fit in eight or ten visits in a day.

I am definitely slower, I stop to take photographs, talk to the artists and collectors, and when I’ve finished my visit I phone Himself who delivers me to the next place I would like to visit on the map. If I can visit three places in a day then I’m delighted, after that the excess of standing up, stairs and pain relief to deal with everything signals a limit and even if there is plenty of time left to see more, I need to head home to get my foot raised up and a decent sleep.

Therefore it’s been fabulous to find that one homeowner has shared their living room space to exhibit with several other artists, so by coming here I managed to see several artists in one place at once, no extra travel, brilliant!!! Now I’m waiting for Himself and am checking out the garden where I was advised that even more art lurks…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 2, 2019

Bettcha You Can’t Do THIS On A 3D Printer!

The Mauritshuis in The Hague doesn’t just have exceptional paintings on show: there are also beautiful works in stone. I am a tad confused by the “Copy After” in the short information panel that was nearby. Does this mean I was looking at the copy, or did it mean that Eggers was modelling his representation of Maurits on some earlier piece by someone else that I didn’t see mentioned?

The name further down on the plinth says: “Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679)’ which pretty much duplicates the information on the accompanying Information panel, so I am not immediately (or later for that matter), any the wiser.

Either way, what I see before me is nothing short of amazing… Bettcha can’t do this on a 3D printer!

Bartholomeus Eggers (c1637-1692) (Copy After) Bust of Johan Maurits, Count of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679) Sculpted 1664.”

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 14, 2019

Finding An Art Deco Design…

Zierikzee has building of all ages, here’s one in the Art Deco style…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 8, 2019

Stadhuis Rooms…

Other parts of Zierikzee’s Gemeente Stadhuis (City council / Town Hall) that I managed to visit during the 2017 Easter break, were several beautiful rooms. However I didn’t see all of the Stadhuis by any means because of time constraints, mostly due to my taking time out to keep sitting down to have a rest. One room has a large piece that has been made with thousands of sea shells. Marble pieces above the fireplaces are also amazing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 31, 2019

Posting A Letter: And A Mystery…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another place I pass during my 2017 Easter break in Zierikzee was a local post office.

These establishments are becoming as rare as hens teeth in the Netherlands, the rapid rise of email and electronic communication having depleted letter post wholesale.

The rise of internet purchases and subsequent parcel post meant that separate couriers arrive for packages, and the humble letter, greeting card, postcard and stamps have been dispatched to a counter located in a tobacconist, book shop or the like.

What hasn’t changed are the large letter boxes,  they are sometimes bigger in size because there are now fewer of them around the neighbourhood too.

Here in The Netherlands there are different slots for different places, so local Zierikzee post, The Netherlands, Europe / Outside Europe are possibilities, depending on the instructions on the front of the box. This makes for faster sorting and quicker delivery.

Behind it however is a very curious stone plaque that incorporates a letterbox in the wall of the post office.

I looked up the “Coat of Arms for Zierikzee and found that it “consists of a black lion rampart, on a red background, with a saber from it’s mouth, topped with  shield covered in a crown and the letter “Z” in gold on each side of the lion“.

This clearly isn’t it. This stone plaque has two lions rampart, standing apart in the top left and right corners. They both face left and there are two small banners above that semi-connect them.

My guess would be that these represent waves, but I could of course be wrong. Underneath the lions flies a bird… which by the wing length and shape of the body looks (at least to me) more like a seagull than anything else, and then the letter slot and beneath that the words “Anno 1940” (Year 1940). I did a search of Coats of Arms for Zeeland and came up with nothing even vaguely similar so this one is a mystery to me. If anyone knows I’d love to find out what this one means or what it belongs to.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

January 5, 2019

Right At Street Level…

Regular readers will know that I love quirky things like the patterns and designs of metal street drain covers, the form of bollards, old stone, wrought iron, brick and the like. The lovely city of Zierikzee in Zeeland did not disappoint. I even found bollards that looked like buried cannon, and there were two of them!, one each side of a museum entrance. (more on that later). Looking around in the vicinity of my feet has become a habit, either because I’m sitting at a lower eye level in the wheelchair, or looking carefully where to park my next step on crutches. Of course my “collection” of things like man-hole covers is only a photographic one, but it delights me all the same. I found some beautiful small markers embedded in the streets, in several other cities of the Netherlands and Germany, these can often denote where Jewish families formerly lived and worked before the terror and horror of the Second World War caught them up and wiped out so many families. In so marking the streets, this is often a small sign that these cities continue to remember these events and their former residents.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Some very old stone repurposed…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The person who designed this master class in brickwork is my hero… beautiful, functional, so pleasing to the eye…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(Above and Below): A series of Art Deco style bollards… maybe even original’s?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Below: small but shiny and bright in the cobbles… a remembrance marker?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Or stop your rainwater downpipe from getting squished and dinged by vehicles (it was a very narrow street) by filling and old milk churn with concrete (cement) and incorporating it into the pavement. Inspiring street decoration and problem solved!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

These ancient stones have been repurposed and now protect a curb…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

An excellent pattern to liven up a man-hole cover….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Heavy duty protection outside the museum. Any driver would think twice before taking these fellas on…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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