Local Heart, Global Soul

October 27, 2019

We Have A Complicated Relationship…

In this post, dedicated to a fellow weaver, Lulu of: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life” we see the last of the pieces on display on this “Parels” )Pearls) day.  Weaving can be used to create a myriad of things. Clothes are probably the most obvious, but practical household objects are of course possible as well. These pot holders show me that colour can be used in the most amazing ways. Himself and I use special gloves (not mittens) for taking our stuff out of the oven so don’t use pot holders now at all, which I kind of regret after seeing these.

This colourful pattern would however make an amazing table runner though! Bright, quirky but not too crazy wild to scare off someone like me who usually sticks to plain blocks of colour in fabric. It’s not that I don’t like patterns, it’s just that I’m not really a “pattern person” and I don’t suit or like wearing just any pattern. Ok…  let’s just be honest: I’m fussy when it comes to patterns. We have a complicated relationship. Either you are a wearer of patterns or you are not. This pattern is beautiful for in the house… I live greens and blues, but the oranges, purples and yellows make each other pop, and in a way that I wouldn’t have expected or thought I liked, had I had this described to me without the visual aid of photographs. Another beautiful pattern that brings this weaving series to a close.

The weaver. Wimke, has a small business card which naturally features fabric and wooden shuttles on the front side… cool!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve edited Wimke’s address, telephone and internet address for privacy reasons and to avoid her getting spammed with malicious mails. Any reader wanting to get in touch with her a serious sale can let me know and I can arrange that you make contact.

weaving Parelsw (Small)edited1

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 26, 2019

Booking It For Later Referral…

It’s always an excellent idea for creative people to keep a record of their work. I did it every now and again over the years, and am now disappointed that I didn’t do it more often. So many things got given away as gifts, on occasion to people I lost touch with when my intended three month trip to Europe became some twenty-six years and counting. Life happens, people move around, circumstances change and some people are very special to you in a specific moment in time, other remain friends for the duration, some are something in-between the two.

Keeping a record of your artist work is a brilliant idea, it can show you how far you have come from your early days, it can inspire or re-inspire you to visit a certain topic, remind you of people far away, or passed away, of moment in time that shaped your future or future self. If you sell your work it’s also a brilliant display case of what’s available and possible and can generate income! In this post, dedicated to fellow weaver Lulu from: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life” is one that she will especially appreciate, after all, a book of beautiful woven creations, Both for Lulu and us…. what’s not to love?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 25, 2019

The Pattern Of Love…

Discovering a weaver during one of my “Parels” (Pearls) weekend visits was a delight. This post is dedicated to a fellow weaver across the pond, Lulu, from: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life”. I loved many of the patterns that I have seen so far, but when I got to this one, my heart starting beating a little faster. Made in the softest of fabric this first piece, and it’s pattern absolutely stole my heart.

It wasn’t for sale, and I have no clue what I would have done with it had it been available. I probably would have just stared admiringly at it over and over and over again. I adore the idea that there is an oh-so-simple and yet complicated pattern that is not really obvious from far away but becomes clear close up. The idea that it’s like two close colours together, like cream and ecru, or in other cases, white on white, where the patterns are there but not leaping in your face, jarring or standing out. It’s like the bark on a tree trunk, from a distance it seems a fairly homogenous colour but up close there is light, dark, colour and texture.  Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful! This lady is very talented.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 24, 2019

Would Be Instantly Recognisable If You Were One Of Us…

My next Pearl, discovered in one of my The Hague’s Neighbourhood “Parels” (Pearls) weekend is a weaver who makes everything from clothes to household items. I told the lady that I followed blogger Lulu of: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life” and would be linking her to these posts, and received a word for a fellow weaver.

This was that the “central panel has a pattern that every weaver would instantly recognise”, and weirdly enough, this was the same pattern that I had especially zoomed in on because I really loved the pattern! (central section of the last photograph). That said, the semi-scallop-y pattern just peeked up close in the very top right corner of the same photograph had me drooling too. Who doesn’t adore patterns? if if you don’t, what a beautiful world you are missing out on!

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 23, 2019

I’m No Fashionista, But…

Following on from Yesterday’s post where I am visiting one of the Hague’s “Parels” (Pearls) events, we are looking at the work of a fabric artist. This lady is a weaver, so I’m dedicating this post to fellow weaver and blogger Lulu from: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life“.

I know from my embroidery and cross stitch days that fabrics and patterns are built up, in layers, or from a central point and worked outward, or in rows. These rows make both simple and complicated patterns in stunning colours. That olive green colour and the soft green-y/aqua remind me of light on water at various times of day… pity I don’t wear scarfs/shawls that often or I would have bought one.

The rustic colour in the one sitting on the table was also very fitting given the autumn weather… it’s also a lovely colour (not too muted, not too bright) for a grey winter’s day. Ha ha, I’m in danger of sounding vaguely like a fashionista … which anyone who knows me would laugh heartily about, because I soooo very much am not.  I’m not a weaver but I can still enjoy these beautiful pieces and appreciate how much work goes in to making them.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 22, 2019

When Is A Scarf A Scarf, Or A Shawl A Shawl?

This post, and the following ones that will be in a small series, are especially dedicated to Lulu from: “Lulu’s Musings: Weaving together the threads of life“. She is a regular follower and commentator on my blog and we share a love of pattern and fabric. Lulu’s passion is weaving, so when I saw that one of the Hague’s “Parels” (Pearls) events was to do with weaving I knew that taking close up photographs would be a must so that we could explore the wonder that is texture, colour and pattern in woven thread.

The “Parels” weekends are where artists, artisans and people talented in all manner of things crafty, open their homes to the public for one or two days so that we can marvel in the creativity in our neighbourhoods, in the various “Parels” held around the city of The Hague. Here this lady creates amazing pieces, everything from bigger articles of clothing, to things like scarfs, shawls, wall hangings and pot holders. This particular piece set out on a on mannequin is an amazing scarf/shawl (I’m not quite sure which this one would be called? It’s long, big, and soft, so whatever you call it, it’s …beautiful!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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