Local Heart, Global Soul

November 25, 2016

Stepping Stones Of Cabbages Lead To Jail…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sometimes your local history lesson can be found directly under your feet.

Such was the case when Little Mr and I visited Gouda to fulfil his wish to go to the Playtoday Lego shop.

Whilst he was only interested in the Lego, I cast my eye around me for the details that give a city it’s character and I didn’t have to look long.

Dotted around us and inlaid into the brickwork of this pedestrian shopping street, were some interesting round cast plaques.

I was puzzled when it became obvious that the first one had broccoli on it, then came all sorts of varieties of cabbages.

Little Mr. was impatient to leave and the plaques stretched a long way further down the street, further than I could manage, so it was a sort of “snap and go” sort of mission, but I got as many as I could in the immediate area.

There was text around some of the plaques and since they had been there along time, dirt from the street had built up, obscuring most of the images and making the text almost impossible to read. I enlarged the photographs on the computer to try and make out individual letters and words, trying to string together something that made sense. Suddenly we made out the word “Warmoesstenen” and it all started to make sense. Himself explained to me that “warremoes” was a very old fashioned Dutch term, and went and looked it up.

It turns out that the more modern word for it is “warmoes” and the text around the broccoli tells us that this ” is the term for a mash made out of vegetable scraps, usually food for prisoners.”

The other part of the word: “stenen” means stones (i.e. these inlaid plaque stones).The next text says: ” Na negeren van een bevel verstoren van de openbare orde of bedreigen van de baljuw volgde berechting” , which translates as: “After ignoring an order, disturbance of public order or threatening a baliff, the court would then pass sentance.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following image text: ” De uitspraak van het stedelijk gerecht leiden tot boetes, gevangenschap, verbanning of tot de galg“,  which means: “The decision of the city court results in fines, imprisonment, exile / deportation or the gallows”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Around the next plaque the words are all for vegetable and cabbage types: “spruit” (sprouts), “koolrabi” (kohlrabi, a.k.a. turnip cabbage), “savooi” (savoy), “radijs” (radish), “paksoi” (bok choi), “koolraap” (swede / swedish turnip), “rammenas” (winter radish), “spitskool” (conical cabbage), “raap” (turnip / swede), “chinese kool” pronounced “shin-A’s-coal” (chinese cabbage) and “raapstelen” (turnip tops).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then I discovered some information about who has placed these here: “De warremoesstenen zijn een schenking van het 100 jarige Goudse Vuurvast NV aan de gemente Gouda”.The “warremoes” stones are a gift from the “Gouda Vuurvast Company to the municipality of Gouda (to mark the occasion of Vuurvast’s 100 year centenary).”

(Side note from Kiwi: The Vuurvast company makes refractory materials that keeps their strength under high temperature. Their products are used in the iron, steel and glass industries to make molds and crucibles and also to make deflectors for rocket launch structures). Once I knew the name of the company who made and gifted these stones I also found the following information (links as usual at the bottom of my post.) The illustration on this stone is Vuurvast’s (literally: “fire fast”) company logo.

The sites were in Dutch so I translated for you:” Warmoes stones: Up until 1845 the landscape of the Lange Tiendeweg in Gouda was dominated by the Warmoespoort, a bridge with in-built cell space for prisoners.The bridge was named after the remains of cabbage leaves that was the prisoners food. One hundred “stepping stones” set into the Long Tiendeweg have been used to build a picture of this historical past near the center of Gouda.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The following stone appears to never have had text on it because the image runs completely off the edges. If the Vuurvast Company celebrated it’s 100th Centenary in 2009 then these have been here for seven years now, hence the build up of grime.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The next text  around the sprouts consists of random words: “vlooken” (to swear), “smijten” (to chuck / to throw), “razen” (furious / rage), “spuwen” (to spit / old fashioned form of  the modern word “spugen” = to spit), “schelden” (scold), “tieren” (rant).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

De cipier kreeg 35 cent per arrestant voor de voeding en genoot een inkomen van 75 guilden per jaar.” (The jailer received 35 cents per prisoner for food and enjoyed an income of 75 gulden per year).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Brassicaceae: brassica campestris var pekinensis (kruisbloemenfamilie: Chinese kool)” (Brassicaceae: brassica campestris from pekinensis (cabbage family: Chinese cabbage)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Bij inschrijving voor afbraak te verkoopen: de TIENDWEGSPOORT. aan het einde van den Langen Tiendeweg.” (Selling upon demolition, register at the Tiendweg gate, end of the Long Tiendeweg.) In the center it says: ” OPENBARE VERKOOPING 20 November 1854“, (PUBLIC SALE 20 November 1854)
… which makes no sense to me, especially the date! It appears then that maybe these were only meant to be temporary and that people could register to buy them later… but the date is 1854 …which makes us all just a tad late!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Here are some of the other stones (duplicate in image to the above, so that you can see the wear and tear…)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gouda Vuurvast Services

More about the history of Gouda Vuurvast (Note:Dutch language only)
 The Gouda “Warmoes” Stones.

 

November 5, 2016

The Pace Of Change Clearly Goes Faster Than I Do…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I needed to accompany Kiwi Daughter to an appointment in the centre of The Hague recently, and since I try to avoid the crowds of the city centre I was surprised to see that one ofthe buildings has undergone a face lift.

It may be old news to many people who go there frequently of course, but it was news to me and it put a large smile on my face.

The symbol of The Hague is the stork and the building has been embellished with large stork-like forms all around the lower edge of the façade. I love them!

They are sophisticated, beautiful, and even in their minimalist style, perfect for the job.

They have a semi-Deco vibe and even in the detail of the faces, have a cheeky, quirky humour about them. Did I mention that I love them? Wow!

The legs come out from the bodies to become some of the window divisions and basic black keeps everything looking dapper and elegant. The street lights are new to me too, harking back to old gas lanterns but with a very modern twist. Before we went to where we needed to go, I lingered for just a moment more to catch a few snaps of a dog, perched in the front crate of his owner’s bike, happily watching the world go by as he patiently waited for his owner to return. He seemed to be very well behaved, and confident, no barking or anything. Getting to the center of town is always a hassle because Himself has to bring me there and pick me up, but sometimes I need to make a bit more effort and try and get here more often, the pace of change clearly goes faster than I do.

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

October 10, 2016

I don’t Have The Stomach For That Kind Of Car…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On the way home from our holiday in Germany last summer, we needed to take several comfort stops because Kiwi Daughter and I suffer from motion sickness and car journeys are always problematic.

Himself has learned the hard way that it’s better to stop frequently so that we can take a few steps outside and get a breath of fresh air, rather than suffer the consequences of trying to push on “just a few kilometers more” (it never was “just a few kilometers” btw).

I had happened to mention a few minutes earlier that I needed a little break from the road and Himself was on the lookout for a good place to pull over.

All of a sudden we came up to a building and spied a sports car in a driveway, and since Little Mr was now suddenly interested too, we stopped there. This is clearly an expensive machine: it’s bright red and eye catching.  An interesting manhole drain cover catches my eye too, as does the pattern of the fence around the property and the  security ironwork around the windows.  One thing is for sure, I don’t have the stomach for ever trying to go as fast as that sports car can go.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

September 18, 2016

A Different Sort Of History Book…

When visiting Trier in Germany last summer the surroundings were completely captivating for anyone who adores architectural detail. Beautiful balconies, stone carvings and wrought iron work were just a few of the delights on show in this beautiful city, this is just scratching the surface of what is here too. In a continuation of yesterday’s post,  the story of this ancient city is written as much in it’s bricks and stones as in it’s history books…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

 

September 17, 2016

More City Spying Uncovers A Multitude Of Gems…

As I mentioned in earlier posts, Trier as Germany’s oldest city is full of amazing architectural detail.
This is a photographic posts detailing some of the gems I spied during our visit…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

 

 

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 14, 2016

Diversity Of The Locations And The Creativity Of The Designers…

This post needs little introduction for regular readers who know that I delight in the small things in life: even the patterns on manhole covers. I find that this one simple item in use all around the world, can display so many beautiful and distinctive patterns that show off the diversity of the places they are located in and the creativity of the people who design them. This manhole cover in Trier is no exception…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

September 10, 2016

The Best Advertisement Of Your Childhood…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When looking around Trier last summer, Family Kiwidutch saw what looks like a shop front that instantly made everyone stop, smile and point out things about what we see to each other.

What we first though as a shop turned out to be a Toy Museum and has an amazing sign outside it’s door that is one of the best adverts for the contents inside that I have ever seen.

Made from cast iron, the sign not only advertises the shop name, but also depicts toys of all varieties too.

We make a list of the items we could find depicted: a kite, an elephant with a trumpet, a cockerel, boat, football, spinning top, jumping jack,  a little pig on a “step” (scooter), wooden blocks, train, wooden doll.

There is also a doll in a pram, a puppet, a policeman on a rocking horse, a monkey, balls, a dice, a windmill, (something meant to be papier-mâché ?) or decorated balloon heads on sticks, and skittles.

It’s work of art, both in concept, design and finished result… it’s quirky, cheerful and beautifully describes what is inside. We don’t have time to visit on this occasion but this is exactly the type of place that I personally would love to spend some (or rather a lot of) time looking around. This sign is one of the best advertisements for the memories of childhood that I have ever seen… delightful!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

August 25, 2016

From Cute To Creepy, Quirky To Classical…

Around Burg Satvey Castle in Mechernich, Germany and in and around the Restaurant Kreuzritter inside it’s grounds, are many ornamental features. Everything ranging from cute to creepy, from quirky to classical styles are represented so there is a favourite to please all tastes. Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Restaurant Kreuzritter / Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

August 13, 2016

Both Panoramas And Zooming In…

The Burg Satzvey castle located in Mechernich, Germany is a rather photogenic piece of architecture. I am kept very busy with the camera both zooming in and taking panoramic shots.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The more I stare at these tiles the more I imagine that they are not slates after all, but pieces of fondant cut out with a cookie cutter…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

August 7, 2016

The Entrance Gate: Burg Satzvey Style…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The first thing that you notice at the Burg Satzvey castle in Mechernich, Germany is that it has an ornate fortified gate as it’s entrance.

Flanked by rounded towers that are in turn topped with onion style domes, it’s impressive and beautiful today, but was probably rather imposing in centuries past.

It sort of looks from it’s construction that it might have been double gated at one time, or at least there was the possibility to make it so, because there is a space between the towers where a narrow staircase leads up to an equally narrow door that in turn leads to the tower area above on one side of the alcove.

On the other side there are various decorations including a religious statue of a female figure (of whom I am not certain).

The architecture is amazing, there are seriously old bricks and stonework worked into the construction, wonderful patterns in the roof tiles and a smooth beauty in the rounded forms of the onion domes and their finials. A metalwork piece hanging on one of the side walls has round disks with numbers on them incorporated into it’s design, seeing as there are twelve numbers on it I assume it must be some sort of sundial, but since it seems to be lacking any sort of pointer to cast the shadow time, it’s hard to tell how this one would have worked. Stone, brick, wood, slate and ironwork… all of them favourite materials of mine, and bonus: beautiful forms and patterns. What’s not to like?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Burg Satzvey Castle / Mechernich / Germany

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