Local Heart, Global Soul

June 5, 2013

A Last Look Around before We Leave…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In my final Mechelen post for the moment we take a general look around the central city.

One thing that captures my attention is that when we went down some smaller side streets the buildings were plain to the point of being solemn and dowdy, house were square grey boxes with no ornamentation in the way of tiles or ironwork whatsoever.

There were not even any bay windows, everything was flat, plain and colourless.

Even Himself, driving and usually oblivious to building styles commented on how dower the buildings were in some streets.

The contrast with the other older and heavily ornamented buildings was stark.

It appears that Mechelen (and I’ve also noticed this in a few other Belgian towns) does either one extreme or the other but nothing in between. Here of course I concentrated on photographing the beautiful buildings  and landmarks that I found…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Cool shop sign… little girls clothes shops I think it was.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Someone didn’t think too hard about the apparent object of affection when they placed these I Love Mechelen tickers on rubbish bins…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 4, 2013

Winching Out the Historical Heavyweights…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I have a few photographs from Mechelen that I didn’t really feel fitted in with any of my posts so far… but I also didn’t want to leave them out.

The first was a photograph on the same information board as the information for the Duivelshuis, Het Paradijs and Sint Joseph’s houses, which depicted a crane. Not a crane in any recognisable form as we might know it today, this “contraption” is clearly both huge and heavy, so I was stunned to read that it was traditionally operated by children. I know that  child labour has a very long and often shameful history throughout centuries past, but surely this one takes the cake?

I only have to think of my own children’s skinny little limbs to shudder at the thought of them being expected to work on docks unloading ships. The text that accompanies the photograph reads:

“Crane Bridge. As the name suggests this was the site of a crane. It was built of wood in the fifteenth century. Operated by the “crane children”, it was used to unload ships. It was demolished in 1887. Before that, in the Middle Ages there had been a footbridge here, followed by a stone bridge. The present-day metal swing bridge dates from 1986.”

Then there are the shoe scrapers… they were used to scrape the mud off your shoes before entering the house and I’ve often seen them in Europe as metal attachments to walls, often in lovely wrought iron forms, but this is the very first time I’ve ever seen one embedded into the wall itself.

Lastly there are the banners, …at first I had no clue who the medieval lady might be, or indeed that it might be a representation of any real person at all, but after my research  it all becomes clear, this is of course the heroine of Mechelen: Margaret of Austria.  I was delighted to read that when the main cities of Belgium were asked to pick someone famous from their history to be their “emblem”  and “representitive” that Mechelen alone chose a woman, and a most eminently noteworthy one at that. Bravo!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 3, 2013

Take A Look Around And See What You Can See…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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As per my Mechelen post of yesterday, we have discovered a walkway called the “Dijlepad” that runs on stilts over one section of the canal. Yesterday’s post was mostly about the path itself, todays post is a photographic essay of some of the views that captured my attention whilst we walked…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

June 2, 2013

This Is As Close As I Will Ever Get To Walking On Water…

Filed under: BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned in one of my recent Mechelen posts a few days ago that we crossed a foot-bridge opposite Vismarkt in the centre of Mechelen in order to grab some goodies from the supermarket located on the other side.

After this we got distracted by the Paradijs, Sint Joseph and Duivelshuis   but soon we were back tracking down the Haverweft, past the supermarket and the footbridge because we knew we needed to go in this general direction to get back to the car and we were very intrigued by something we had spotted earlier.

The canal is a wide one, in this section of it there would easily be room to moor large craft on either side and still sail a third between them.

Therefore someone has come up with a brilliant use for this space: a walkway has been built over the water, raised on stilts so it’s possible to walk below street level also under several bridges.

It’s also decently long, extending from Hertshoonstraat  all the way down to the bridge at Vijfhoek. The walkway is called the “Dijlepad”, and since it’s a beautiful day we decide to take a little walk along the water.

There is one tiny drawback that I soon discovered: large sections of the boards spring up and down a little when other people pass. It’s certainly nothing excessive, it’s like a tiny rocking motion of a boat moored in the water. Usually this would represent no problem but using a crutch to walk and having less than perfect balance at the moment, I found it a little disconcerting.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Despite the fabulous weather we only shared the walkway with three other sets of people and I opted to hold onto the handrail as they went by and since I walk slowly they all outpaced us very quickly. This is my physiotherapy exercise for today… and I have my work cut out as it’s a decent distance.

There are beautiful views of the buildings along the canal… many of them centuries old and in various states of repair. We saw renovation work going on in quite a few places. At one point I was taking photos and walking slow so Himself and our friend waited for me to catch up.

When I reached them our friend said “see the big fish on that building!”   Despite repeated directions as to where to look, try as I  might I could not see any big fish at all.

Then we worked it out… there is a handrail at street level above us, she  is standing at a different angle and can see the fish  but from where I’m standing,  the metalwork obscures it from my line of sight. I shift around  a few steps  and the fish appears. I’m not going mad after all.

Under one of the bridges I notice that the storm water pipes from the bridge and street above stick out very close over the walkway. It might be tricky to be on the walkway in a cloudburst…  and further down a very old building with a tree growing out the side of it, the roots are embedded into the wall and it’s hanging on in a most precarious manner… We joked that this is probably the closest we are ever going to get to walking on water… and set out to enjoy the sunshine…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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June 1, 2013

Off To Heaven And Hell, um… With a Quick Stop At St. Joseph’s…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are enjoying a quick visit to the Belgian city of Mechelen: it’s essentially a business trip but we have just enough time to  have lunch and take a little look around.

Opposite the restaurant where we had the tagine there is a large footbridge and we ended up on the other side of the canal simply because that’s where the supermarket we wanted to visit was located.

Going home without some beer for Himself and a few friends and some waffles for the kids was not an option and I was keen to get a (dried) leg of ham … but the latter wasn’t stocked here  so I was out of luck.

Luckily we succeeded on the other two counts and tested just how much weight my little backpack could carry stuffed in as many bottles of local and unusual stouts as possible.  The other good thing was that since it was Himself’s beer, he got the job of carrying the now seriously heavy backpack  from then on.

We were just exiting the supermarket when we saw what looked like a tour group party making the rounds with their guide. They were short distance ahead of us and all were stopped at a corner a little way down the canal, and crowded around taking photos.

While Himself was busy (re) arranging beer bottles in the backpack so that the zip would close, I took the opportunity to ask a lady leaving with her shopping what the tourists were looking at please.

“Some of the oldest houses in Mechelen” she said, “… and the oldest wooden one, they are very nice, you should go and take a look“.

Needless to say this became the  next stop on our walk and thus we duly arrived at the same corner now deserted, as the bus tour tourists had departed rapidly to keep to their schedule.  There is a wooden information board on the canal side of the Haverwerf (street name where these stand) that gives some information:

“Houses: St Joseph, the Little Devils, Paradise:  These Facades are representative of the evolution of dwellings in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. First they were built of timber and later of stone. From left to right you see: baroque, timber and Gothic with early-renaissance features.”  

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I found quite a few websites where these houses were mentioned but most were just a line or two of the same information… so I’ve amalgamated all  the little bits I found. On several websites they were referred to as the “Heaven”and “Hell” Houses too.

The white and green house corner house  of a row of period buildings is called “Het Paradijs”  (Paradise) and dates from between 1525 and 1550.  

The style is transitional, with Gothic crockets and finials coexisting with Renaissance-influenced tympanum reliefs.  Its front shows scenes from the Earthly Paradise  and two of those reliefs are Adam and Eve scenes:  one representing the Tree of Good and Evil and the other the Expulsion from Paradise (hence the name of the house).

Next door to “Het Paradijs” house is the house called “Duivelshuis / de Duiveltjes” (Devil’s House / Little Devil’s)  and it dates from 1545-1550  though quite a bit of its original planking has been replaced.

Dark carvings depict the story of the Prodigal Son, including a couple of devils. Apparently, its original name (Prodigal Son) never caught on; “de Duiveltjes” or little devils stuck, probably because the fçcade is decorated with  three satyrs or devils.

On the other side of this the “Duivelshuis” house stands “Sint Jozef”. A statue of Saint Joseph showing you Jesus is incorporated in its front. Judging from their glum faces, the little devils are deeply unhappy with their neighbours. The houses are all privately owned.

The angle of the sun ( in our eyes as we looked at the front of the buildings)  made harder than I thought to get some detailed photographs of the façades but I did my best (a higher viewing point would have been handy too) and therefore in one blog post  full of photos I can literally take you from the houses of Heaven to Hell and St. Joseph and back. In this Blog you can sometimes travel veeery far indeed.

http://wikimapia.org/17024194/Devil-s-House
http://wikimapia.org/17024187/Paradise-House

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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May 31, 2013

Lifting The Lid On Something Totally Unexpected For Lunch…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This post relates to a trip some weeks ago when Himself and I took a friend of ours to the Belgian city of Mechelen to help with an urgent personal matter.

We have to get everything done today with reasonable speed and get back to the Netherlands  by early afternoon because otherwise our children will be finishing school and will be wondering where on earth their parents have disappeared to.

(We did arrange backup with other friends in case we got delayed in traffic or unforeseen circumstances but I’d taken some annual leave the week we went,  and had made  other promises to the kids too so it was preferable to get back on time if we could).

The business end of things went relatively fast today (compared to the previous trip we made a few weeks earlier in the pouring rain when our friend was made to wait ages in more than one establishment even though she had previously arranged appointments).

Since it was a stunning day today we decided to have a very quick lunch and a better look around the city centre  in the sunshine as we made our way back to where the car was parked and then headed to the motorway again.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We stumbled on a little area full of cafés and restaurants with outside tables in a picturesque area by Vismarkt. There wasn’t really time to look at the various menu’s, our choice was made more by trying to stay upwind from little gaggles of dining smokers.

All of us were rather thirsty by this time and ordered cold drinks,  then opened the menu and were surprised to see only a very short range of menu choices: pretty much all of them being tagine.

After recovering from the shock that there was nothing like a sandwich on offer we settled into the idea that having a tagine for lunch might not be a bad idea at all.

Himself likes a hearty breakfast and if he eats warm in the middle of the day he would very much to have accompanied his meal with a very nice local beer (lots of that available in Belgium!) or a glass of wine, but being by necessity the only driver amongst us, and by far the least hungry, he opted to pass on food and went for  tea and a little of our bread instead.

Our friend and I were hungry though, so ordered a vegetable and chicken tagine respectively and after a short wait were each presented with single serve tagines containing our meals. Yikes, these containers were hot… literally fresh from the oven, and the steam poured off for ages, making for impatient photo taking.

Due to our time constraints I didn’t even remember to photograph the menu for the name of the place,  ( the waiter had removed the menu’s before I had my wits about me). I did ask for a business card but they didn’t have one and so I didn’t even get the name. I can tell you though that it’s the red/brown place with four upstairs windows and  red tiled roof in my photographs, so a description will have to do.

It was not overly spicy, but also not bland and we each enjoyed our meals. We agreed afterwards that whilst we liked what we ate, the unexpectedness of the menu had caught us off guard and eating this at a leisurely pace would have been far more enjoyable.

However, we had already  made  wish-list of what we want to do with our short remaining time and in order to achieve it we needed to rush lunch. It’s a pity we didn’t really do it justice.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 30, 2013

Er…I’ve Temporarily Run Out of Funds, So my Building Will Get Finished in 400 Years….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During my recent trips to Mechelen, one in fine weather and one in foul,  I still tried to investigate as much of the city centre as I could even in the rain.

Opposite the main entrance of the Cathedral (on the side away from the Square) I find several beautiful buildings that caught my eye and later, on the trip in fine weather  in a little side street

I found a stunning wooden door, massive in size and character.

At one end of the Grote Markt square there are a group of buildings, the largest of which of course is the Cathedral, at the other end there is a beautiful building that upon enquiry turns out to be the Stadhuis (City Council / City Hall).

I searched for some more information about this striking Hall of Mechelen and found some interesting information on Wikipedia (in the Dutch language only) so I’ve translated the most interesting bits into English.

“The town hall of Mechelen started out as Old Hall with Belfry and is located on the east side of the Main Market Mechelen and consists of the Palace of the Grand Council, the belfry and the Cloth Hall. Since 1914 the complex has been used as a city hall.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Palace of the Grand Council was built in 1526 by Rombout II Keldermans to accommodate the Great Council of Malines.

Financial problems prevented work progressing past the ground level and the building was left unfinished for nearly 400 years.

Between 1900-1911, led by architects Van Boxmeer and Langrock the building was completed according to the original 16th-century plans and it therefore decorated in neo-Gothic style.

The belfry is on the list of the UNESCO World Heritage Site along with the other Belfries of Belgium and France.

It’s in the Gothic style from the 14th century but also contains several baroque elements from the 17th century.
The central tower section was never fully completed as planned. A later addition to the building was demolished in 1526 to the north so that there was enough space to construct the Palace of the Grand Council building. The Cloth Hall was built built in the 14th century and was used to trade in textile products. In 1342 it was extensively damaged by during a fire and later drastically remodeled.”

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadhuis_van_Mechelen (Dutch language only)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 29, 2013

Mechelen Carves Out Some Serious Style…

Filed under: ART,BELGIUM,Mechelen,PHOTOGRAPHY,Statues / Sculpture — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The contrast of styles of statues around Mechelen is a reflection of a city with a long and exciting history and sculpted art forms to match.

The first in of my finds stands next to Romboutskathedraal, St. Rumbold’s Cathedral in the Grote Markt  is a statue of Margaret of Austria (1480-1530) who was the daughter of Maximilian of Austria and Mary of Burgundy, co-sovereigns of the Low Countries.

After Margaret’s mothers death in 1482, her father and the King Louis XI of France signed the Treaty of Arras where her father promised to give Margaret’s hand in marriage to Louis’s son Charles. The engagement took place in 1483 when she was only three years old.

She was educated at the French royal court and prepared for her future role as queen of France where Margaret developed genuine affection for Charles but in the autumn of 1491, when she was 11 years old he renounced the treaty and married Margaret’s stepmother Anne, Duchess of Brittany, for political reasons.

Margaret was not returned to her step-grandmother’s court until June 1493, after the Treaty of Senlis had been signed in May that year. Margaret was hurt by Charles’s action and was left with a feeling of enduring resentment towards France.

Margaret’s father Maximilian started negotiating the marriage of the heir John, Prince of Asturias to Margaret then aged 16. In order to achieve an alliance with Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon so Margaret left the Netherlands for Spain late in 1496. The marriage took place in 1497. John died after only six months, on 4 October and Margaret was left pregnant with a daughter, stillborn on 8 December.

In 1501, Margaret married Philibert II, Duke of Savoy (1480–1504), who died three years later. This marriage was also childless.
After his death, she vowed never to marry again. Her court historian and poet Jean Lemaire de Belges gave her the title “Dame de deuil” (Lady of Mourning).

During a remarkably successful career lasting from 1506 until her death in 1530, Margaret broke new ground for women rulers. After the early death of her brother Philip of Spain, in November 1506 she became the only woman elected as its ruler by the representative assembly of Franche-Comté (her title was confirmed in 1509).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Her father Emperor Maximilian named her governor of the Low Countries and guardian of her young nephew Charles (the future Charles V) in 1507. From her newly built palace at Mechelen, Margaret acted as intermediary between her father and her nephew’s subjects in the Netherlands, negotiated a treaty of commerce with England favorable to the Flemish cloth interests, and played a role in the formation of the League of Cambrai (1508).

After his majority in 1515, Charles rebelled against her influence, but he soon recognized her as one of his wisest advisers, and the only regent ever re-appointed indefinitely by the ruler who dismissed her she was again governor of the Netherlands (1519–30) intermittently until her death.

In 1529, together with Louise of Savoy, she negotiated the Treaty of Cambrai, the so-called Ladies’ Peace.

Her reign was a period of relative peace and prosperity for the Netherlands.
She died at Mechelen, after appointing her nephew, Charles V, as her universal and sole heir. She is buried at Bourg-en-Bresse, in the magnificent mausoleum that she ordered for her second husband and herself.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Austria,_Duchess_of_Savoy

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Nobody will associate the town of Mechelen with Ludwig van Beethoven. But still, there is a link.

It was not the famous composer who lived here, but his grandfather who owned a house here.

There used to be a house in Mechelen called the ‘Koraalschool’ (= choral school – see picture below ), which was nothing more than a school for the education of the choral singers of the St. Rumbold Cathedral.

On 10 December 1717 a certain Lodewijk (Louis) van Beethoven was enlisted here as a new student. This man was the grandfather of the famous composer.

The van Beethoven family were bakers. Louis’ father, Michel (the composer’s great-grandfather), started a painting business in Mechelen, but ran into financial trouble and had to leave Mechelen to try and find his luck elsewhere. The entire family moved to Bonn in Germany. This is why two generations later the baby ‘Ludwig van Beethoven’ was not born in Mechelen.

http://www.trabel.com/mechelen-beethoven.htm

The other statues grabbed my photographic attention and admiration but I couldn’t  find out more information when I went to research more detail.  The images are stylistically very different… but all are captivating in their own way… visual jewels,  enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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What are there three ladies talking about?  Possibly admiring the view from where they stand?…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 28, 2013

It’s Hard to Tear Myself Away, But Finally Through All The Detail, …I Find The Door

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s not only stained glass that sets my artistic senses humming… there are carved  plaques, massive wooden doors,  carved cherubs and acanthus leaves, both in wood and stone.

Here in Sint-Romboutskathedraal (St. Rumbold’s Cathedral) in Mechelen, Belgium, there are grand columns with exquisite trailing vines twined around them,  a statue of the Virgin Mary with amazing  painted detail on her gown… or the font, also in carved  and embellished in red, blue/green and gold paint.

The acanthus leaves continue around the top of the central columns, or on the base of a plinth holding a very large candlestick.  It’s a detail fanatics heaven and this detail fanatic is in her element.

Of course these photos are not only here for me to drool over and to share with you, they are also part of my  artistic “inspiration file”…

…where better to study flowing drapery and beautiful forms than from the examples of skilled artisans who preceded us through centuries past. It’s a lesson on how to get things right. It’s a history lesson and an art lesson all rolled into one. I can only hope that the spirits of these people somehow know that they continue to inspire people centuries after they have gone.  This is my last post about the inside of Sint-Romboutskathedraal, but it’s certainly not the last time I intend visiting here.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

acanthus and patterns 1j (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

acanthus and patterns 1q (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 27, 2013

Glorious Coloured Light….

Today I bring you one of my last posts from Sint-Romboutskathedraal (St. Rumbold’s Cathedral) in Mechelen, Belgium. Naturally there is more stained glass here than I can manage to document in one visit… here’s an overview of some of the stunning windows.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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