Local Heart, Global Soul

September 1, 2020

These Flowers Face The Sun Forever…

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

On the outside wall of the Hartebrugkerk (a.k.a. “the Coelie“) in Leiden, is an information  plaque which was hard to read in places.

Rather than watch my head explode I palmed off handed the text to Himself who is the linguist in the family for translation.

Sweetie that he is, he didn’t even mind, apparently he likes a challenge or two when it comes to this sort of thing. The text reads:

HARTEBRUG CHURCH

Roman Catholic parish church, built in 1836 by Th. Molkenboer.

The church is named after the Harte Bridge over the Mare flowing alongside the church.

The original dome was in such a bad state of repair in 1892 that it had to be demolished immediately.

It was replaced in the same year by the current tower above the façade.

The façade and the tower were renovated between 1979 and 1982.

Municipality of Leiden.

OUR LADY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION // HARTEBRUG CHURCH //  Location of the Parish of Saints Peter and Paul // Eucharistic Celebrations Sunday 11:15, Thursday 12:30 // Secretariat Hartebrug Church // Haarlemmerstraat 106 // 2312 GD Leiden.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

Inside the front doors is a small foyer/porch which contains additional doors leading into the church self. The church was clearly open, but I could hear music inside and was loath to Interrupt a service or music practice.

Therefore I turned the wheelchair around and went out again, but not before I got photographs of my surroundings and these door with their geometric and sunflower stained glass window panels. Nice to know that these graceful flowers can face the sun forever…

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 31, 2020

Hopefully Not A Lost Reference…

On the front of the Hartebrugkerk (a.k.a. “the Coelie“) in Leiden, is a plaque. Clearly a commémorative piece to remember those lost in WWII, it is (to my eyes at least) a fairly jumbled scene that includes everything from soldiers, planes flying overhead, to men, women and children with suitcases in a small wagon, likely a reference to the Jews who were deported and murdered in camps around Europe.

The text around the top of the memorial is a Bible verse that reads: “I am the way, the truth and the life“. Benieth is written: “1940-1945”.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 30, 2020

The All-Seeing Eye Keeps Watch…

The front of the Hartebrugkerk in Leiden is impressive. Columns lead the eye up to the eye up to the triangular gable wherein sits the all seeing “eye” that is obe of the famous features of this building. Beneath the “eye” sits the Latin text that gives this church it’s nickname: “the Coelie“.

I detailed that here in an earlier post explaining: “Hartebrugkerk, Built As Compensation…” Directly in front of the church doors is a busy intersection of two shopping streets, where a small roundabout has been placed.  The shops had just opened and the streets suddenly went from housing only early bird workers, to slowly filling up with cyclists and foot traffic.

It’s still quiet enough to carefully keep distance, the wheelchair presence seems to especially stop people from wanting to cut in close, they probably don’t want to get run over. My secret to social distancing: I’m slow but they don’t know that.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 29, 2020

Simulation Lace Curtains…

Leiden’s Hartebrugkerk has of some beautiful architectural features at it’s top, including a small eight sided dome leading to eight triangular panels, and a balustrade below the tower just on top of the roof.

My favourite piece however has to be the little white strip behind each of the bell tower windows that have wooden decorative pieces to simulate lace curtains behind the ventilation strips/ or are they shutters? Excellent touch!

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 28, 2020

Hartebrugkerk, Built As Compensation…

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

The Hartebrugkerk on the Lange Mare in Leiden is a large and imposing church.

Wikipedia tells us that:” The Hartebrugkerk is a church in Leiden with the official name of Our Lady Immaculate Conception .

The church is named after the bridge  in front of it at the time. (Kiwi’s note; “brug” being the Dutch word for Bridge).

Among the people of Leiden the church is also known as the Coelie Church , after the last word of the Latin saying above the entrance, Hic Domus Dei est et Porta Coeli

(This is the house of God and the gate to heaven, Genesis 28.17).

The building was designed by Theo Molkenboer and completed in 1836. In 1892 the church was provided with a new tower, designed by architect Leo van der Laan .

The church is one of the so-called water management churches* and was built in neoclassical style.

Classical influences are clearly visible, such as the Ionic columns with the tympanon or pediment above them.

An eye is depicted in the tympanon, representing the all-seeing eye. The continuous frieze (below the tympanon) reads the above Latin saying. The interior contains many reliefs and statues, including a series of reliefs of the crucifixion of Jesus and statues of saints and the four Evangelists.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(* Water Management churches or “Waterstaatskerk” is the name for Dutch church buildings built between 1824 and 1875 with financial support from the national government.

Design and construction of such churches was subject to approval and control by engineers from the Ministry of Water Management. Contrary to popular belief, the concept of Water Management Church is not linked to any particular architectural style.

This arrangement was introduced to end conflict between Catholics and Reformed over the ownership of old churches. An earlier scheme aimed at a proportional distribution of church buildings failed due to the frequent refusal of the Reformed side to cooperate.

A number of churches were officially returned to the Catholics, but they could not use the buildings because the Reformed refused to leave them. In compensation, the government promised financial support for the construction of new churches and the restoration of old churches. In most cases these were Catholic churches.)

The church is actually longer than it first looks due to a lower end section joined to the nave (I’m not certain if this would be called the Choir, Apse or something else.)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 21, 2020

Stone Trails of Blooms…

Stone carving in architecture is one of my favourite things. Here in the Marekerk in Leiden, scrolls of blooms lay intertwined with ribbon as they surround each side of the entrance door on the West side entrance. The ribbons trail off into fabric folds at the end. Gorgeous!

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 20, 2020

Triangular Glory In The Facade…

On the main entrance of the west door of the Marekerk, is a Dutch classical facade with two triangular centrepieces. The smaller of the two contains a blank cartouche; which is a kind of (often) scrolled surrounding, or frame for the initials, name or some sort of text or important inscription.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Below): This has the “frame” but not the text. Below the blank cartouche however is a panel of beautiful carved stone scrolled acanthus leaves, stunningly done.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Below:) The top, larger triangular form on the facade is very far from a blank page, it consists of a large central cartouche containing two crossed keys. I have just learned from my amazing regular, and ultra-knowledgeable reader Marie-Jacqueline that this refers to Leiden’s nickname of “Sleutelstad” (City of keys).  (Thank You so much Marie-Jacqueline, your help is very much appreciated!).

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Below): This cartouche with keys is supported by a cherub on each side, holding garlands of flowers. Above these flowers are heraldic shields containing not the usual coat of arms, but various symbols. I went and enlarged the shields on the original photos: on one side the first shield has a large castle with four towers on the top half, and a four sided Maltese style cross and a horse in the split bottom half. the other shield has one single large tower over water on the top half and a large acorn on the bottom half.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Bottom: there are also two shields o the other side of the centrepiece. The first shield has a traditional cross and a … hare? while the second shield has the heads of three deer on it.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 19, 2020

The Compas Points To Marekerk…

Marekerk in Leiden also has compas settings on it’s eight sides just below the large dome. They read with slightly different letters than in English because “Oost” is (East) and “Zuid” is (South). Therefore Dutch letters for the points of the compas are: N,O,Z,W.

Around the Marekerk these read:  “Nord, Nord-Oost, Oost, Zuid-Oost, Zuid, Zuid-West, West, Nord-West,”  (North, North East, East, South East, South, South West, West, Nord-West, and then of course I arrive back to North again).

I first wondered who in the general population would have to know the compas points but then realised that it makes sense. After all, if Himself and my ancestors were as navigationally challenged as we are, these would certainly have helped them to stop getting consistantly lost.

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 18, 2020

Eight Stunning Curves…

The Marekerk in Leiden has graceful octagonal buttresses and a form that dominates the skyline.  Wikipedia tells us that:

Marekerk is  Dutch classical octagonal church, and one of the first churches built for Protestant worship. Construction began in 1639 and finished in 1649, and designed by city architect Arent van ‘s-Gravensande.

The portal on the west was added in 1659 on the instruction of van ‘s-Gravensande’s teacher;Jacob van Campen who was the architect for, among others, the Paleis op de Dam (Royal Palace of Amsterdam).

Inside is a pulpit from 1649. The organ, built in 1629, was moved in 1733 from the Pieterskerk (St Peter’s Church) to the Mare Church.

The special shape of this octagonal central building is explained because it was built especially for Protestant service, with a central pulpit and chairs grouped around it.”

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

August 17, 2020

Angels, …And Pineapples?

The building that has been dominating the skyline in this part of Leiden so far is the Marekerk. I  was intrigued to see just how close I could zoom in so focused on the top section of the church.

Just before the weather vane section is a brilliant, gold or gold coloured object that I can only describe as  “pineapple” style. The section below this what appears to be a single belled bell tower, topped with a dome that leads to the pineapple.

A four faced clock with gold lettering is below that and below that again, another, far larger larger dome.

I took quite a few photographs of the very top, trying to figure out that the emblem was on the weather vane. Finally I managed to be in a position where I could see it side-on. It turns out to be an angel blowing a trumpet with a ball and two golden keys below that. 

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

(photograph copyright © Kiwidutch)

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.