Local Heart, Global Soul

November 10, 2017

Everywhere Means Something To Someone…

Filed under: ENGLAND,Folkestone,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

The Netherlands and New Zealand commemorate those who served and fell in wartime in May and April respectively.

The United Kingdom celebrates Remembrance Day on ” the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month” and has many events held on (I think the closest Sunday) called Remembrance Sunday, which will be this weekend.

I could not walk everywhere when we last visited Folkestone and need frequent rests so when Himself and our friends made of several small tours of the town, on this particular occasion I stayed behind. Luckily I have a wonderful husband who knows what I might find interesting, so he took photographs of a couple of things he thought I might like to show me once they returned. Both of the things he took photos of are bound to a common theme: Remembrance days. The first was an iron rail fence festooned with bright red poppies, they stretch some way into the distance, but these are not real poppies, they are all knitted!  These hundreds of knitted and crotchet poppies have required some serious hours of skilled labour!

Himself forgot to get a close-up so the only one we can see really close by is next to the accompanying information sign which reads: “Everywhere Means Something To Someone”. ‘Road of Remembrance. What is now called the Road of Remembrance, was originally known as Slope Road and was the route that 10,000,000 soldiers marched down on their way to Folkestone harbour and on to the trenches in France and Belgium in WWI. At the top is the war memorial, commemorating the men who dies in battle, and a cairn, built from granite blocks. About half way down on the left hand side, is a five room bunker embedded in the cliff, which was a naval telecommunications HQ in WWII. Two local ladies set up Mole cafe in 1914 on the Harbour Arm, offering free tea to the troupes, and 42,000 of them signed a registration book as they embarked.”

Himself also took photographs of a large silver arch at the end of the long run of poppies and the text from the  information board that went with it, which read: “The Step Short Centenary Arch” commemorates the millions of men and women who passed through Folkestone in the service of their country during the first world war. Dedicated by HRH Prince Henry of Wales on 4th August 2014.” It may not be “my” Remembrance Day, but I believe that everyone who sacrificed their life in the fight for democracy and freedom deserves to be remembered.

(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Mr Kiwidutch)

February 3, 2017

A Good Way To Gear Up For A Difficult Day…

Filed under: Accomodation,ENGLAND,Folkestone,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wards Hotel in Folkestone, England was the place that Himself and I selected to be our accommodation when we needed to be in the city for the funeral of a friend.

The friends widow was also located close by, in a house that the couple had moved to in a down-sizing exercise once it became clear that the husbands cancer was inoperable and his life expectancy was short.

We also found out that  due to the large number of attendees at the funeral, the wake would also take place in the Wards Hotel.

The hotel staff start preparing things soon after the breakfast guests have finished having breakfast. Himself and I chose to have hot typically “English” breakfast, Himself having the plate with the mushroom,  I have the one without since I am allergic to them.

After breakfast we are of course busy with funeral related activities for the day:  the church service, then the graveside one, the wake, and later in the evening, a visit to see our friend’s widow because we need to leave early the following morning to head back to the Netherlands.  The breakfast is nice, we especially enjoy it because it is so different to a typical Dutch bread based one and a treat. It’s not the sort of thing that would be healthy to have on a daily basis but as a special indulgence… well, a little bacon and egg is a good way to gear up for a difficult day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

February 2, 2017

Wards Hotel, A Restful Spot To Spend Our Stay…

Filed under: Accomodation,ENGLAND,Folkestone,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last year Himself and I crossed the English Cannel via the Channel Tunnel in order to attend the funeral of a friend.

In the past when we came to Folkestone we would stay with these friends, but on this occasion, with the husband having passed away, the wife is busy hosting family who have travelled from outside the region.

Also, they no longer have the massive house that they raised their six children in, having downsized to a smaller place since our last visit after it became clear that his cancer was in an advanced stage and that nothing more medically could be done.

We hear that the new house is packed with guests, many sleeping on the floor and added to that, there are a constant stream of visitors because her husband was active in many aspects of not only the local community but also in a small but UK wide specialist organisation as well.

Our accommodation whilst we are here is the Wards Hotel, handily located just a street or two away from our friends home. The bedrooms are on the first floor and there is no lift, but luckily I will only have to use the stairs once each way per day. This a family run hotel, the family and the staff are friendly and as is often the case in the UK and western European hotels these days, many of the staff are made up of eastern European migrant workers.

Our room is on the quiet side of the hotel (not facing the road) therefore there is no view to speak of, just an interesting piece of roof line from another part of the building. There is an attached bathroom and whist the room is not huge, it is definitely big enough for our needs. The location is in a quiet street off one of the main roads in one of the older established neighbourhoods of Folkestone, it’s leafy and remarkably quiet. Tired from our journey here, Himself fetches fish and chips from a local take-a-way and after a picnic dinner in our room we get an early night.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 18, 2015

Ely To Cité Europe In Record Time, Then Onwards To Home…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch travelled to England in 2013 for a family wedding.

It was a long weekend in May and apart from a disastrous cloudburst just the the bride and groom left the church, we have for the most part had beautiful weather.

The rest of the family, taking the ferry from Harrich to the Hoek van Holland have a short car ride and then a long crossing on the boat.

We, having opted for the channel tunnel have a lot of driving but a crossing that only takes thirty five minutes as opposed to the eight hours plus on the boat.

The children have asked about a possible breakfast at the Little Chef that’s almost next door to the hotel and we figure that if we are there when the doors open in the morning then we can have a quick breakfast and get onto the road in time to get to our channel crossing appointment.

As it was, traffic was lighter than we expected and we got to Folkstone over an hour earlier than we expected. We made our way to the channel tunnel and instead of having to wait, were told that there was space if we wanted to catch an earlier train.

We did, and on the French side we had time to pop in to the Cité Europe shopping centre close the channel tunnel entrance on the Calais  side of the channel.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On the French side it’s also clear to see the measures that have had to have been made to stop illegal immigrants from attempting to stow away on or underneath trucks, trains and other vehicles about to make the crossing to the United Kingdom.

Exceedingly tall fences surround the Cité shopping mall and for kilometres around the train areas.

It follows the road for quite some distance  before we see open fields again.

Annoyingly we come up against one of the downsides (or upsides, depending on how you look it it) to France: weekend shopping hours have not been embraced so on this long weekend almost all of the shops in this gigantic mall are closed. I was hoping to pick up a cured ham but we are out of luck, we make our way down to find the gates leading into the supermarket are well and truly closed.

We can at least make a toilet stop and after that it’s back on the road and back to The Hague. The kids are tired and after a while squabbling and getting comfortable in the back seats, they fall asleep and a quiet peace reigns in the car as the kilometres glide by.

It’s dusk by the time we turn into our own street and it’s been a long day on the road, but the way has been smooth and the traffic easy, and we are safely home to our own beds.  It’s been a wedding to remember, and a lot of kilometres in a weekend but worth it for a special family occasion.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Interesting decoration around the restaurants…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

calais way home 1m (Small)

Cité Europe

 

May 17, 2015

We Send Balloons Into The Fast Clearing Skies…

Filed under: Ely,ENGLAND,LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags:
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Continuing on from yesterday’s post and the wedding that no one will ever forget, the wedding breakfast and party at least go smoothly.

The weather, having caused chaos earlier in the day has now improved greatly, and it’s now a dry and balmy evening.

One thing that the bridal couple have organised for all of the children are a large bunch of helium balloons, with strings and little notes for the children to write their addresses on.

Of course my children, along with their Dutch cousins, wrote their Dutch address as the “sender”of the balloons, even though the balloons were “posted” as it were from near Ely and not The Netherlands.

Each balloon was released into the evening sky with much speculation about if anyone would find the notes and drop the children a line, but in the end we heard nothing back, probably not so surprising considering the large amount of open fields around the church.

The kids were very excited about letting the balloons go and watched them until they were tiny specks in the sky.

The wedding evening  party was far larger than the sit down wedding breakfast (as is of course common at weddings) and since the bride and groom were saving for a home of their own, they asked workmates, friends and UK relatives to bring a plate of food as part of the wedding gift. In this way they had a buffet table filled in no time and delicious food!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 16, 2015

The Near Horizontal Wedding That We Will Never Forget!

Filed under: ART,Ely,ENGLAND,LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY,Stained Glass,Statues / Sculpture — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags:
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It was a long weekend in May in 2013,  four Dutch families had crossed the channel to England to attend a family wedding.

The big day dawned bright and warm,with blue skies and perfect weather.

It was an afternoon wedding so the families had a fairly leisurely breakfast together and then got ready.

Final preparations were made in our hotel room, kids playing together, parents chatting, cousins catching up.

Later when we stepped outside to go to the car park we were astonished to see dark grey skies and heavy clouds threatening rain.

The wedding was to be in a tiny local church, there would only be enough space for parking near the church gate for the bridal car and that of the bride and grooms parents. All other guests had to park in a parking lot at the end of a lane. There was also room in the further away parking lot for the coach that had been hired to take other friends and family. Since the Dutch contingent had all come to England  in our own cars we just used our own vehicles to get to the church instead of using the coach.

Realising that the lane was quite long, Himself wanted to get there as quickly as possible, sneak our car up the lane so that he could drop me off at the church and then take the car back to the further away car park. So far, so good. That worked.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

He joins me and the children a short time later and since the first drops of rain start to fall a few minutes later, we take refuge inside the church.

Other guests quickly start to join us, the photographer is supposed to get photographs of every guest (or set of guests) coming into the church, but he is late and many of the guests are not really keen to go stand in the rain to have their photograph taken. After about fifteen minutes the rain eases and the groom and his family have arrived.

The tiny church is packed with guests as the bride arrives on the arm of her father. She is a very shy girl who has been prone to panic attacks for many years. She has worked hard to overcome various obstacles in her life and her husband to be is a wonderful, gentle, quiet, reliable man who everyone agrees is a perfect match for her.

The bride appears rather overwhelmed, nervous and very pale as she enters the church on her father’s arm. They walked the short distance to the alter where she suddenly swayed alarmingly and said she felt dizzy. A chair was quickly fetched and she sat down. After a minute or two the dizziness was worse and increasingly unsteady she looked like she was about to faint so she opted to lay down on the church floor.  The minister, realising  at this point that the bride was really stressed, asked for all photography to please stop from now on.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Her husband to be joined her, as did the lady minister, who had a quiet chat to her. We assume that this chat was to confirm that there no last minute concerns, that she wanted to get married and that she was going through the ceremony of her own free will.

It became clear that this ultra shy girl was completely overwhelmed at suddenly being the centre of attention, but wanted to get married with all her heart. The problem was that as the bride with all eyes on her, the more attention she got, the worse she felt, feeling that she was letting her intended down, her parents, friends and family.

She felt ashamed that she was laying on the floor looking and feeling like a fool and so the dizziness and panic attack got worse. The mothers of the bride and groom went and consoled her, tried to tell her that everyone here loved her and understood and that no one was judging her, they just wished her all well.

The minister rearranged the order of the church service so that readings, singing and a small sermon took place first, giving the bride time to compose herself and be calm in her own time with the congregation focused on something else.. It seemed to work.

The marriage vows were about to take place. The bride attempted to sit on the chair. She swayed alarmingly again, but tried to stay calm and since she was so unsteady , again for safety’s sake opted for sitting on the floor.

The minister told the groom that he too needed to join her at the same level as she was not allowed to marry them if one of the couple was in the higher position than the other. The groom promptly asked with a laugh: “do you want me sitting or laying down?” the congregation giggled.

He held the bride’s hand throughout, reassuring her and telling her that it was all o.k. and that he loved her. The vows took place with the bridal couple on the floor.

The seats of the chairs became the “table” for the signing of the register. There was almost not a dry eye in the church. I have never willed a couple to get though their marriage ceremony as I much as I did for these two.

They are a beautiful couple so suited to each other and clearly over the moon in love with one another. They are best fiends and soul mates and everyone who knows them knows that. When the final pronunciation came that they were husband and wife, a small cheer and then applause rippled through the guests.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Phew, I was more nervous for her than I was myself on my own wedding day! They made it through their ceremony and after a further “rest” on the floor the bride felt steady enough to be helped to her feet and walk down the aisle with her new husband.

They exited the church so that some photographs could be taken and about five or ten minutes later there was even more drama as the heavens opened. A serious cloudburst, rain pelting down by the bucket load. The cars for the bridal party were near the church gate, but all the other guests, including Family Kiwidutch were in the little lane when the deluge began.

Himself gave me an arm and tried to support me as I hobbled as fast as I could on crutches but then left me and sprinted to the car as fast as he could with two children behind him running like mad to keep up, he let the kids into the car, grabbed an umbrella that was in the boot and sprinted back to me as quick as he could, holding the umbrella over me for the rest of the way back to the car. We both were dripping wet by the time we got back to the car and the kids.

The scene was of scurrying guests everywhere, most were lucky because the coach was parked a bit closer than the private cars, but huge puddles had appeared out of nowhere and the rain was still lashing down so people were criss-crossing puddles, mud and trying to run in high heels and best wedding shoes.We reached the car breathless and almost fell into our seats in our haste, it was raining so hard that none of us could see out of the windows at all.

Himself started the engine and the windscreen wipers and even on full speed the downpour was winning. We waited for while until the rain abated enough to make it safe to drive away and then headed to the venue where the wedding breakfast and party would take place. Everyone giggled and shrieked as they hurried inside, raindrops flew off umbrellas, hats and coats and guests lamented their seriously damp and dripping bedraggled hairstyles.

Amazingly about an hour later the rain stopped completely and the sunshine returned. The rest of the evening went really well, the bride, although embarrassed, was reassured that we all felt for her and no one minded the unconventional marriage ceremony, in fact I think that everyone there said at one time or other during the festivities: “this is certainly a wedding we will never forget!”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 15, 2015

Breakfast And A Radiant Day For A Wedding …But Is It?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch have arrived in Ely in England for a family wedding. Himself’s cousin has arranged a booking in a Travelodge close by so that three families coming from the Netherlands could all stay in the one hotel.

The hotel was undergoing extensive renovations during our stay so all of the hallways were covered with plastic sheeting and there were scaffolds in various places because they were busy painting the ceilings.

“Reception” was in a portacabin in the parking area out the front of the hotel but at least all of the staff were very friendly and most apologetic for the inconvenience of the renovations.

Luckily Mark’s cousin, knowing about my asthma problem had pointed out that fresh paint would be a problem, so they arranged that our room would be right at the end of one of the wings as that section had been painted first, in the previous week and they also aired the room as much as possible before we arrived.

It meant a long walk to our room and a very long walk to the other family members who’s rooms were at the extreme end of the opposite wing, so knowing I would see plenty of them at the wedding, I opted to stay and rest in our room and let Himself and the kids go backwards and forwards to see rest of the family in their rooms.

Right next door to the hotel were several fast food restaurants and we all arranged to meet for breakfast the next day at the “Little Chef” next door. Little Mr was delighted with the single portion servings of cereal,  Kiwi Daughter  adores maple syrup so pounced on the pancakes and Himself and I went for a cooked breakfast.

Afterwards my sister in law , cousins and families visited our room before we all departed for the wedding, ladies sharing make-up tips and making sure that husbands and children were suitably presentable.

The weather as we got ready that morning was wonderful, bright blue and not a cloud in the sky. Himself and I even  wrote in the wedding card, mentioning that they had fabulous weather for their wedding… but an hour and a half later as we left the hotel we all got a surprise as we stepped outside, the skies were suddenly grey and ominously dark, and everyone had been so absorbed in conversation that no one had even noticed the change…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 14, 2015

The English Have Vineyards? … Then Onwards To Our Destination.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

On our 2013 trip to England and after a lunch stop in Saffron Walden, Himself spied a road sign that indicated a vineyard.

Intrigued because we don’t think of England as a wine making country we decide to investigate. Luckily it wasn’t too far out of our way, so we made a detour to the Chilford Hall Vineyard.

I stayed with the children in the car whilst Himself went in to select a bottle of wine.

He came back with a bottle which he drank the next night with relatives in the hotel we were staying in.

Being on strong pain mediation I am not drinking alcohol at all but from the reaction of the rest of the adults drinking it, it wasn’t a particularly brilliant wine, at Himself was pleased he hadn’t bought more than on bottle.

After out brief stop at the vineyard we got back onto the motorway and reached the outskirts of Ely in good time. Even from here we can see the towering spires of Ely Cathedral, beautful and imposing on the horizon.

I also catch a glimpse of a property with very green credentials: there are at least two small wind turbines in the front garden as well as a solar panel. Excellent!

The email we got from Himself’s cousin told us that the hotel we and other family members were booked at was somewhere out of town so we needed the help of Our Lady Of  The Tom Tom to finally “reach our destination”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Chilford Hall Vineyard

 

 

May 13, 2015

A Very Sweet Treat In Saffron Walden…

Filed under: ENGLAND,kid stuff,PHOTOGRAPHY,Saffron Walden — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags:
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In 2013 Family Kiwidutch were on their way to a wedding in England, and having crossed the channel via the channel tunnel, and visited friends in Folkstone, we headed north, taking a lunch break in a town called Saffron Walden.

We’ve enjoyed a lunch of fish and chips and were about to leave when we spied a shop that had our children shrieking with delight and begging for a closer look: a little English sweet (candy) shop called “The Sweet Shop”.

We have time, so we decide to take a closer look.

Inside the shop are shelves filled with old fashioned glass jars filled with all sorts of sweets. Our children are set a budget and then comes the hard task of choosing which of the goodies are the “best”.

The process starts to take so long that Himself goes outside the shop to avoid the agony, whilst the shop owner explains very patiently what many of the sweet flavours are.

Eventually our children emerge with huge grins on their faces, having made their selections. I thank the lady in the shop for her unending patience and lovely shop, she is really friendly and didn’t mind in the least.

Little Mr. is most delighted about his “fish and chips”… not real ones but ones made of white chocolate!

We get another look at this town with it’s beautiful buildings before we leave and continue our journey, this time with silent children in the back seat. One bonus: at least they can’t fight with their mouths full !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Sweet Shop Saffron Walden
1 George St
Saffron Walden, Essex CB10 1EW
United Kingdom
tel: 0754 532 9047

facebook.com/TheSweetShopSaffronWalden

May 12, 2015

Fish And Chips, A Surprise And Learning What’s In A Name…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s blog post, Family Kiwidutch are in England and after visiting friends in Folkstone and then heading northwards, we decided to leave the motorway and find some lunch.

The place we have arrived at is called Saffron Walden, and Family Kiwidutch are in complete agreement what choice of cuisine we want for lunch: a very traditional English Fish and Chips!

One thing I had completely forgotten was the size of the pieces of fish, I was about to order one for each of us when we saw one of the pieces and then decided to share a couple of them between us all, which turned out to be an excellent moved because a fish and chip meal is very filling.

It was only much later, looking at the photographs on the computer back home and being curious about the name of the town, did I see that we were almost literally a stone’s throw away from Audly End House, one of the places we visited with Velvetine when she visited Europe the year before this trip!

The reason I’d gone to the computer was that I wondered if the town Saffron Walden maybe got it’s name from the production of Saffron and Wikipedia (link at end of this post) confirmed that indeed it was the case!

“In the 16th and 17th centuries the saffron crocus (crocus sativus) was widely grown, thanks to the town’s favourable soil and climate. The flower was precious, as the extract from the stigmas was used in medicines, as a condiment, in perfume, as an aphrodisiac, and as an expensive yellow dye. The industry gave Walden its name”.

That certainly explains the bright yellow fields in are area! I love the timbered and half-timbered buildings in the town, there is clearly some history here!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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