Local Heart, Global Soul

October 2, 2013

A Loo, A View, An Exit Too…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now that we have walked around the Canterbury Cathedral, I start to realise how big the grounds around it are.

We pass by the toilets where the kind lady and Kiwi Daughter took Little Mr. when we arrived the other day and he was desperate…

…we pass the ruins of another ancient building and then an interesting wall with what might possibly be pieces of quartz instead of regular stone, and with a variety of  white plaques embedded into it, and finally we exit onto an open courtyard area where we can see the massive stone walls that enclose this part of the old central city.

We make our way through a little door that leads into a stone sort of gatehouse that with a tiny detour and a few steps find us at the top of the staircase under which we parked when we arrived the other day and looked for our accommodation. We descend the distinctive looking staircase and find our rental van parked close by. It’s time to jump in and travel to our new adventures…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

October 1, 2013

The Detail Of The Outside Draws Attention…

When we came into visit Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England, I took photographs of the outside in order to gauge the massive size and beautiful shapes of the building. Now before we leave the grounds I’m concentrating on the finer details found in the window shapes and the nooks and crannies of the Cathedral. Let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 30, 2013

The Coloured Glass, And A Mystery … Makes Me Linger…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page in my diary as I document our travels and adventures of last summer.

We are about to leave Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, Kent, England, but I’m captivated by the stained glass windows and  can’t resist one last post before we go.

Interestingly  not all of the glass is medieval, in fact some is very recent as it features the current British Royal family in two large windows.

The first depicts Queen Elizabeth’s parents, Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother and George VI, with their daughters Princess Elizabeth (now the current Queen) and Princess Margaret as children and the second window depicts the now Queen Elizabeth with Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles and Princess Anne as children.

One thing intrigued me about this second window, is the panel on the left depicting men who I believe are the heads of the Church…  there is a man in the background who has black hair and who’s face is depicted in almost photographic detail, far more than the detail given to any other figure in the entire panel, including the Royal family. Not being familiar with these people I am unable to put any names to the faces, but I am very curious as to who this person is and why his face is depicted in a different style to the rest. Other windows also show medieval Kings and Queens with what I assume to be their children in the side panels, so clearly this is a tradition that is centuries old.

So many beautiful windows and so little time… you can never have enough stained glass to look at in my opinion, and here in Canterbury Cathedral there is enough to keep me engaged for many a happy hour. I wish I lived closer so that I could come here regularly.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 29, 2013

The Designer Thread Continues…

We are soon to leave Canterbury Cathedral,  and are looking at some of the things I didn’t manage to fit into other posts.  Although the  candle that is supposed to commemorate Thomas Becket wasn’t lit when we visited, the candle that burns for Amnesty International was…  There are paintings and tapestries in the Cathedral too , as well as tombstones set into the floor. Once again decoration abounds…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 28, 2013

Velvetine And I Both Suffer From Pattern Disease…

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

Regular readers of my blog will know that I’m a detail fanatic.

Here in Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, Kent, England there is enough detail to keep me happy for a very long time.

I assumed that it was only me who would ooh and ahhh over patterns in stone, but I’m delighted to find that my good friend Velvetine suffers from this  “detail disease” just as badly as I do. We egg each other on and probably look totally mad to other visitors, but we simply didn’t care, we just revelled in the opportunity to takes a zillion photographs of the things we love looking at. Himself really doesn’t understand this fascination, and to him one bit of stone is  much like any other… he has the attitude “seen one statue, seen ’em all”…. but Velvetine and I know better.

Again, a lot of these photos are for my artistic reference files… they inspire me and I have a long term design idea what I’m busy planning in my head but haven’t quite figured out how I can make work on paper yet.Fear not, I’m almost done with this sort of post… we will be back on the road shortly.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

September 27, 2013

Natural Greenery … Still Beautiful In Grey…

Another page of my last summer’s diary detailing a visit to Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, Kent, England. Although the structure we are in is of course made of stone, there are still natural forms  to be found. They appear as leaves, wreathes and vines and they are everywhere. I’m not talking about real plants however, these too are carved into the stones all around us.  This post is as much for my artistic inspiration archive as it is for my general viewing pleasure… I love the flowing forms, the three dimensional aspects so skilfully achieved and the different styles. Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 26, 2013

People Fade Into History, But Their Footsteps Remain…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page in my last summer’s diary as I tour Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England with my Singaporean friend “Velvetine”.

She and I are kindred spirits when it comes to appreciating the visual arts. We both adore carved stone or wood, stained glass and ironwork, and appreciate the history of the pieces and the skill of the craftsmen who made them.

In this post we were both photographing different aspects of ironwork we found and some of the motifs in the floor…  a flight of stairs caught our attention because you think of stone being hard and indestructible and yet  it’s no match for nine hundred years of human footfall, wearing  the stone into distinctive patterns.

Negotiating these steps on crutches was one of the hardest parts of the day, but fortunately Velvetine was on hand to help with a steady hand and I wasn’t trying to do these in a hurry.

Ironwork in the form of some decorative gates and railings catch Velvetine’s eye and camera lens, whilst I found some different metalwork to put into the frame.Then there are the patterns in the floor, some of them very old by the look of them…  just goes to show that there is more than enough to see here, from the views high up to the views literally under your feet.

Between these beautiful patterns and the stone staircase it just goes to show: generations of people may have long faded into history, but in some strange way their footprints remain.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph ©Velvetine) used with permission

September 25, 2013

The Art of Hiding Something In Plain Sight… The Trick Is Knowing Where To Look.

Filed under: ART,Canterbury Cathedral,ENGLAND,Funny — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s considered completely normal for artists to sign their work and many have gone a step further and quietly incorporated their own self portraits into one of the members of a crowd scene, but it’s usually harder to to find a signature on a stonemasons work.

I heard once that often there would be the practice of leaving a signature, or a particular identifying mark or initials in the base of a statue or on the backside of a wall carved piece of stone.

But here in Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury Kent, England, one stone mason in 1908 went a step further and left his initials right on the front of the commemorative plaque he had worked on.

Naturally, probably knowing that the person paying the bill for the stone would appreciate this rather less, he decided to be discrete about it and so neatly inscribed his initials “JLL” and the date “1908” in millimetre high letters within the letter “G” of the word “Wynberg” third row up from the bottom. The position of the plaque and available light help hide the evidence too…  and make photographing it difficult. It really blends into the colour of the stone.

The sneaky trick of “hiding something in plain sight” was never more true than here… his initials are literally on the front page, but only visible to those in the know. Second class vandalism or a masterful and cheeky  first class artistic licence? You decide.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

 

 

 

September 24, 2013

Where Do You Start? … And Where Do You Stop?…

canterbury cathedral stained glass windows 3k (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another page of my photographic diary and I’m back to the stained glass.

Not only are the windows super-sized and immense, there are also so many of them, I barely know where to look and where to start.

Canterbury Cathedral, here in Canterbury, Kent, England, certainly knows how to put on a light show.

There are plenty of photographs to drool over, but let’s be honest: take a good hard look at the size, scale and detail contained in a single window, I think that showing the detail of several windows in one post is really hard, when do you stop when there are so many beautiful details taunting you for right of entry?

I think that with the aid of a cherry picker crane to get high enough, a tripod and a lot of patience, it would be possible to maybe produce a book on the stained glass contained in the windows here at Canterbury Cathedral.My worry would be however, that even with a single close up shot of each panel,  the resulting book would end up being thousands of pages long. I like the borders of the glass panels as much as the story telling panels that make up the inner section…  the glass painting on some of the pieces is of stunning quality,  these artists had amazing talent.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

(photograph © Velvetine) used with permission

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_Cathedral

September 23, 2013

I’m Probably Reading Too Much Into It, But I Think The Last One Is Hiding Something…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In continuation of yesterday’s post, I’m visiting Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England and busy admiring the beautiful figures carved in stone all around me.

Yesterday’s post was about the mortals in stone, this post reaches a little further and is all about the angels.

The expressions on their faces are all very different, they range from the infant cherubs type to the more adult sort and come in both realistic and very stylised forms.

One poor angel is in desperate need of restoration, and is clearly praying for a new nose and a few extra fingers please.

Some are playful, some are serious, a little group of three appear to be sleeping, and one at the base of a large stone plague is definitely not amused (but probably you’d be rather cheesed off too if you had a plaque resting on you head).

Another group of five, all in a row, hold shields with various emblems on them, but it’s a different one, also with a shield that hangs from a gallery that impresses me the most. This one manages to look not just contented but mischievous and full of character at the same time. This is the kind of angel that you could imagine has a secret catapult hidden behind that shield. Had there been a sudden ping and a pea whistling past my ear once my back was turned I would not have been at all surprised.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

…and is this one really a little angel?….

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_Cathedral

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