Local Heart, Global Soul

April 19, 2014

Set Up Your Easel And Paint Me A Picture Of Place Du Tertre…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

After leaving the peace and relative quiet of Le Parc de la Turlure behind the Basilica of the Sacré-Cœur, I’m passing by the tourists who are walking up the various sets of steps up the hill on their way to the Sacré Cœur.

I back-track a little bit as I take the road that goes completely around the back of the Basilica,  a few streets further and I’m already at my next destination.

It’s a little square perched on the side of the hill, here are mostly shops, cafés and restaurants at ground level with apartments above.

The day I visited was a sunny spring day in 2009, the place was heaving with tourists and the crowding on the street made worse because  in one restaurant a film crew are filming: their equipment is stacked on the street, microphones on poles are over their heads, the film crew are trying to work as the tourists try and squeeze past,  it’s probably just “another day as usual”  in Place de Tertre.

The Place du Tertre is a square made famous over a century ago by the struggling artists who used to live here. Picasso was one of a long list of names and it’s a place where then as now, easels were commonplace on the pavement as the artists worked. I had intended to go today to “Place du Tertre L’Espace Salvador Dalí”  which is just around the corner, it was recommended to me because it has an excellent collection of  Salvador Dalí’s drawings and sculptures but I spent longer in the Le Parc de la Turlure than I had intended and now the film crew and the crush of tourists have made walking so slow that I think I will come back to the Dali museum on a future trip when I have more time. I’m due to meet up with my American friends in a little while so content myself with checking out the artwork on the easels for sale.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The film crew on the street with their equipment… vying with the passing tourists…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

April 18, 2014

One Of Paris’s Little Secrets…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Most tourists visiting the famous Sacré-Cœur only stay long enough for a few photographs of the front and a quick peek inside.

In one way that’s a good thing because it means that one of Paris’s little secrets might still be a little bit of a secret for a little while longer.

Back in spring of 2009 I was in Paris visiting American friends who’s tour group were spending three days there, we had been internet friends for several years and now was the perfect moment to meet up in person.

If you take a short walk around the side and back of  the Sacré-Cœur Basilica, then you will find yourself facing a little green gem in the heart of the Montmartre district: a little park called “(Le Parc de la Turlure)”.

It’s not big by any means, but even on this warm spring day the shade and beautiful setting is a more welcome and it’s surprisingly peaceful!

In fact it’s so peaceful that after making myself comfortable on one of the stone benches I was in grave danger of falling asleep!

There’s a wall-of-water type fountain that makes the sound of a rushing stream, and nice seating in the shade so I did wish I’d bought a picnic lunch. After a nice rest  I started walking again, now on the other side of the hill that I had come in at, back into the Montmartre district. I didn’t take all of these steps (yet) but at if I had chosen to at least the walking would have all been down hill!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 17, 2014

Zooming In, You Never Know What You Might See…

Once a detail fanatic, always a detail fanatic… blogger or no blogger back in the Spring of 2009 I still filled my camera with close ups and as much detail as I could manage. This trip to Paris was no different, here is a photographic post on the stunning detail of Sacré-Cœur…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Gargoyle? No, just a cheeky imp…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

April 16, 2014

Sacré-Cœur, So Much More Than Just A View From The Hill…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Basilique du Sacré-Cœur (Sacré-Cœur / Sacred Heart of Jesus Basilica) is one of the most visited and photographed places in Paris.

Stand on the steps outside and “people watch” and you will see everything: bus tour guides trying to keep their group together and on schedule for the next destination, trying round up the stragglers who want “just one more photograph” or souvenir.

There are school trip parties of either fairly young children or teenagers, the first distracted because they would rather be in a playground somewhere and the later  looking bored because these things aren’t really cool but at least a day out is better than a regular day at school and stacks of homework.

You see the obvious stereotypical types too: backpackers, the retired couples, the singles, the best friends in Paris, the lovers, the kids on family holidays getting their dose of culture and then there are the hawkers, buskers, gypsies and somewhere blending in, the pickpockets too.

Sacré-Cœur basilica is located at the summit of the butte Montmartre, the highest point in the city. It was a was designed by Paul Abadie. Construction began in 1875 and was finished in 1914. and was consecrated after the end of World War I in 1919. Sacré-Cœur has it all, it’s beautiful and so imposing that even then you are driving around the Paris ring road it’s sometimes possible on a clear day to catch a glimpse of it in the distance. The American friends I came to Paris to meet are busy with their tour group at the moment so I’m alone and can wander as I please. I join the hordes and turn my camera to the beauty of the Basilica. I might not have been a blogger  back in May 2009 when I took these photographs but I was still very interested in beautiful buildings and taking photos.

One thing everyone wants to see when they look out over the Parisian landscape is la tour Eiffel (the Eiffel Tower). Tourists peering desperately into the distance as they search don’t realise that you can’t see it if you are standing  looking out at the city directly in front of the Sacré-Cœur. You need to follow the curve of the road to the right and a 3-4 minute walk around the corner, past some tall trees on the hill will suddenly bring  tour Eiffel into view. Voilà !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

af1r sacre coeur (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris

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