Local Heart, Global Soul

August 15, 2014

Restaurant in Promiri: Fabulous Menu, AMAZING Desert…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

We’ve arrived in the Greek hilltop village of Promiri,  It’s dark but this is Greece in October and it was still a balmy twenty five degrees.

Our in-laws have warned us that this is no tourist restaurant, the menu will be made up of whatever meats, fish or vegetables are available on the day, so the favourite dish you had last week or even yesterday might not be on the menu  and it’s the most “local” in style of all the restaurants they have found in their twenty one years of visiting this region.

Himself and I love this idea but we worry a bit about our fussy children.

We decide to have a wait-and-see attitude and if push comes to shove they may well be dining on bread, fries or rice, but who knows, a small miracle might happen and they might also be hungry enough to try something new. (Well, I live in hope). The restaurant is on a small square and outside is the massive tree that is one of many local landmarks. I’m assuming it must be at least one hundred years old.

Inside the restaurant is full and almost completely with locals, but wither that’s because this is a well kept local secret or because  it’s the last week of the official tourist season I don’t know. I’m not sure of the name of the restaurant  (I think it’s “Ortas”) so I took a photo of the serviette with the details.

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

There is a sign on the wall that I ask about, our in-laws don’t know either so we ask the friendly waiter who explains that it’s a left over from the “old days” when every commercial establishment was required to show what sort of category it was in, this sign therefore declares (because this is a restaurant) that this is “Establishment type number four”.

There is also an old style cabinet that houses a set of  wine taps, an old painting done in the Greek Orthodox style of  the Last Supper and in complete contrast, a new beer bottle that’s been heated and stretched so that the neck has both been decapitated from the rest of the bottle but is still at the same attached.  Later in the evening, whilst we are having desert, the chef comes out from the kitchen and joins some of the locals at a nearby table for a drink and a chat.

The meal here is “unconventional” compared with the menu’s we have experienced so far in Greece, but fabulous all the same. The waiter is a young man who speaks good English so he explains the menu and we all take pot luck and choose something different. The meal was amazing: I will keep the fried fish on Palio Trikeri Island in first place as the best meal I’ve had in years, but this is a close second.

It must be said though that although the island had the main course beaten, the same could not be said for the desert. The desert here was brilliant, fabulous and amazing all rolled into one… the desert we had was the  “Pièce de résistance” of the meal and consisted of marinated walnuts in sweet syrup on yogurt with whole cloves inside … and this was beyond FABULOUS!  (and finally I find a Greek desert that is not cloyingly sweet!).

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Buttery toast ready for spreads …

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Fabulous aubergine in smoky cheese sauce…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Kid fries…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Establishment Number four…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Fabulous pork in lemon and white wine sauce…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Lentils…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Little fried fish…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Tasty grilled pork fillet…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Spicy sausage in eggy omelette style…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

The Chef comes out…

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

Desert: marinated walnuts in sweet syrup on yoghurt with whole cloves inside … drool-worthy!

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

(Copyright © Kiwidutch)

 

 

August 14, 2014

Promiri, Hilltop Living Greek Style…

Filed under: GREECE,Pelion Peninsular,PHOTOGRAPHY,Platania - Promiri — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We’ve been having another rest day in Platania, well to be more accurate, I rested and Himself and the kids burned off some energy helping their cousin and our brother in law tidy up their garden.

There was urgent pruning to be done, thousands of  half rotted windfall apples and walnuts husks to get onto the compost heap, leaves to be raked and in general massive tidy up to be done before the weather turned cold.

Several days earlier I had hobbled around their garden throwing rotten apples and walnut bits into buckets that I got the kids to haul to the compost heap for me but the uneven ground proved too much for my foot so I rather literally sat out the next day of  garden labour when it came around.

We were visiting the village of Platania in October of 2012 and at our in-laws house these was a hive of activity to get the garden done before leaving the house empty over the winter months.

Later, next year at Easter whilst it was still cool, my brother in law would come back with several male friends for their annual  “boys building week” of mess, turning the place into a building site of carpentry and renovation projects, tools everywhere and sleeping bags on the floor.

They would be working on the most urgent of the repair chores, overhauling  the garden after five months of winter weather and working together on bigger projects like the roof or the veranda or the kitchen or levelling the ruts in the driveway depending on what needed work the most urgently.

During their stay back in October  of 2012 however there was plenty of work to be done so Little Mr. got a lesson on how to using a pruning saw in very tree branches (although he insisted of course that the boughs he removed were “this big” and indicated with his hands sizes bigger than he was).

He hauled the debris of his own labour to the “wood pile” (in his case, kindling) and arrived back at the end of the day at our accommodation proud of his labour, grinning broadly and covered head to toe in dirt.

By now it was getting on in the day and no one was in the mood to cook. After depositing Little Mr. in the shower and scrubbing at least the top layers of dirt off him, we set out to join our in-laws at a place that they recommended we eat together at in a village close by.

The village is called Promiri and my brother in law tells me that it’s one of the most photogenic villages in the whole of the Pelion peninsular. Apparently it dates from around the sixteenth century and it’s steep stone hillside streets are magical for photography.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sadly we were not there in daylight, so I had to make do with images that I could capture in very low light.

We parked the cars as close as we could get and set off down some narrow streets to the eatery that our in-laws want to introduce us to.

Naturally I’m the slowest on both this and the return journey to car, and Himself gave me an arm for the steepest bits… but we had been told that we were in the right place when we saw the large tree, … what an understatement, it’s wasn’t large it was enormous!

They say that Greeks are healthier and live longer because of their Mediterranean diet, but seeing how few veggies they eat in this area and how many fries are on offer, I have another theory.

I think it’s just that they burn more calories walking these kinds of streets and they simply use more energy than the rest of the western world does these days… Parking is almost impossible close to the restaurant so patrons have to put some effort into getting here.  Knowing Greek cuisine I may be well pleased of the hard walk back to the car after our meal…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

 

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