Local Heart, Global Soul

March 16, 2017

The Adventure Of The Hunt…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Back in 2016 we spent the Easter long weekend on the Dutch Island of Texel.

We were there with two other families, both with children quite a bit younger than ours. Naturally Easter for each of our families is not Easter without Easter eggs and an Easter egg hunt.

Since our accommodation at de Krim holiday park is the largest and our kids want to be the ones hiding the eggs, we arrange that the young daughter of the friend staying with us is the one who needs to accompany Himself to get bread that morning and that their return coincides with the arrival of our other friend with younger ones.

As soon she is out of the house the rest of us get to work hiding eggs that have been hidden away in our suitcases until now.  Little Mr and Kiwi Daughter race upstairs to find good places to hide eggs, working together to find places not too easy and not too hard.

Then they come downstairs to help me, there are not only eggs but also each child gets a glass drinking jar with a few small eggs inside it.

The kids hide an egg wrapped in red foil in the fruit basket with the apples for instance, I get them to put one out on the bird table outside, another goes inside the wooden umbrella stand in the hall… the list goes on. The photographs were mostly taken by my kids, sorry for the um… “soft focus”.

The smaller kids arrive back at the appointed time and shrieks of delight ensue as they scamper around the house, guided by clues given by our children. The entire morning is topped off with a combined families breakfast at our place and a houseful of kids delighting in a miracle of a day once per year when they are permitted chocolate for breakfast. The story of Easter is of course more than just that of chocolate eggs, but on this day the kids only have eyes on the chocolate and the adventure of the hunt.

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

January 5, 2017

Kiwi Daughter Wood Prove Me Wrong…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back in mid December 2013 Family Kiwidutch were in New Zealand on holiday.

We spent a few days in Christchurch before heading up to one of our favourite places: Hanmer Springs.

We had no sooner arrived and headed off to the hot pools  when the season’s firewood delivery truck arrived, and in error, the wood dumped partly in the small shed and partly on the lawn in front of it at the back of the property instead of in the garage.

Jason who runs the Hanmer Holiday Homes rentals apologised for the mix-up, the wood should have gone into the garage and just as we were discussing what to do next, Himself and Kiwi Daughter bounded in: they wanted to be the ones to shift it.

Apparently there is nothing like shifting two and a half cord of firewood to burn off the blues of sitting in a plane for a total of twenty-four hours, they thought the exercise would be great fun. I cautioned Kiwi Daughter against the idea that the first fifteen minutes would be great and then she would want to pack things in, but no… apparently she was even keener than Himself to take on the job. She assured me that she would see it though. I told Jason that everything had been worked out, so everyone was pleased.  After long flights I always have more problems with my asthma and my foot was sore, so I headed off to some pain killers, nebulization and a nap, leaving Little Mr comfortably reading comics because he wasn’t keen to join in with the work outside.

Meanwhile Himself and Kiwi Daughter set to work and by the time I woke up they had shifted half of the enormous pile of wood from out of the shed and in front of it and stacked it against the far wall of the double garage.

(photograph © Kiwidutch) NOTE: Shed in distant back above top left of picnic table.

(photograph © Kiwidutch) NOTE: Shed in distant back above top left of picnic table.

Even at the half way stage the outside pile of wood reached as high as Kiwi Daughter’s shoulder. She was powering along with no sign or intention of stopping.

I started to take photographs of the work from that point.

Later Kiwi Daughter reluctantly stopped work for dinner, then pushed on, telling us that she aimed to finish everything in one day but it finally got too dark to work or take photographs.

When the light faded we prized her away from the last of it, it was too much to finish safely and yet little enough that it was frustrating.

Kiwi Daughter surprised us by being up bright and early the next day, out at the shed, the steady thud of lumps of wood as they landed in the wheelbarrow being my early morning wake up call.

A little over an hour later Kiwi Daughter and Himself had not only cleared up the wood from the lawn but also cleaned and swept the shed and garage. It was a very impressive feat that earned her a hot meat pie from the local shop, followed by a an extra large helping of gumdrop ice-cream in a cone.
I found out later that day from Himself that Kiwi Daughter’s motivation hadn’t come completely out of the blue. She was twelve-going-on-thirteen years old at this time, and in a strange stroppy pre-teen stage.Therefore like most kids she had been testing parental boundaries, which included months of neglecting household chores.

I had told her several times prior to our trip that she was a lazy kid(which she was at the time) but on this occasion she had said to Himself: “I am going to prove to Mama that I am not lazy!”). This “proof” turned out to be temporary mind you.. it didn’t extend to most holiday chores later, her excuse being “but Mama, I’m on holiday!” I have to say that I was seriously impressed with the work she accomplished, it may have been a one-off but it proved that she has the determination to stick to her guns and finish some seriously hard work, even if the going got tough after a while. I was proud of her… She wanted to prove me wrong, and she did!

(photograph © Kiwidutch) NOTE: The shed that was in far background of previous photo.

(photograph © Kiwidutch) NOTE: The shed that was in far background of previous photo.

The remaining half of the woodpile was up to Kiwi Daughter’s shoulder…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The distance between the shed and the house (garage on the other side of the house per second photograph)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Half of the wood stacked inside the garage whilst I slept…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

First thing the next morning this was all that was left…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A shout out to the friendly neighbour who loaned us the wheelbarrow…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Little Mr’s contribution: play with his “plane”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 23, 2016

There Is No Age Limit On Fun, … Or Wagers.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Before we leave the “Playtoday” Lego shop in Gouda I am keen to take a look at some of the detailed models in the shop.

Parked inside large perspex display cabinet these display pieces are safe from prying little fingers but make photography tricky, so a few of my shots have lighting issues.

Little Mr. and I probably spent rather too long excitedly pointing out to one another some of the especially well done details that we saw to one another but there is no age limit to having fun is there?

In general, each of us liked different things but share a love of a “good build” and humorous details.

We agreed that the use of tiny, clear round bricks to represent the breaking of waves around a wind sailor or a jetty was a masterful move,  he loved the balloon “hovering” over the island, I loved the jewel detail in the pirate island treasure chest and we both grinned when we saw a crab on the roof of a beach-front property.

I loved building things a a kid and was disappointed that Kiwi Daughter never looked twice at Lego, so my son’s delight is also my own, I am often to be found being the Chief Lego “sorter outer-er”, combing through heaps to find a piece that he needs to make his next project complete.

It gives us a chance to chat about stuff too, and what he doesn’t know is that I am secretly trying to learn some of the construction tricks of the trade.

Why? the answer is simple. I looked at a few of the entries in the competition display cabinet and said ” I could do that!” which was met with horrified, wide eyed disapproving stares from Little Mr. “Not cool“… he declared later in the car, “that was sooo embarrassing“.

The problem is that he doesn’t think I am anywhere near being able to enter any competition. Oh yeah?  In fact he believes so strongly that I can’t that he has wagered me Euro 10,– of his pocket money that I win. Yes,  of course he stands to gain the same from me if I can’t.  Entries are once per year, at the beginning of the 2017 summer school holidays. I have to start thinking about a topic and a build that will blow everyone out of the water. Hmmm… Thinking cap would be great… if I had thoughts. I have time. Watch this space.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 22, 2016

There’s Profit In Inspiration And Building Dreams…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “Playtoday” Lego shop in Gouda is probably one of the places closest to heaven as far as Little Mr is concerned.

They are open one Sunday in the month, which is how we found ourselves there exactly as the doors were opened, and with Little Mr chomping at the bit to give the place a full check over.

The “pick-and-mix” brick wall drew him first, but it wasn’t long before he discovered the room out the back where Lego was laid out on tables for people to build with.

There are also display cabinets containing competition entry models, which prompted much debate between the two of us about which we thought was the best.

I love the models but the Lego figure wall decorations are one of my favourite things there too.

All around us was Lego, Lego and more Lego, and once again I have to give credit to a company that not only makes money from the wishes of kids but also inspires so much creativity and zeal from the product they sell.

I took these photographs in the first fifteen minutes we were inside, after that parents started to arrive, pulled in by their offspring. It just goes to prove that the is a profit to be made in inspiration and in building dreams.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

November 21, 2016

Building On A Summer Time Wish…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My son is a die hard Lego fanatic.

Not only is it an obsession, he has built up an encyclopedic knowledge  about which bricks belong to which sets,  which parts are often used together,  tips and tricks for all sorts of building and the best prices for pieces and sets.

It’s true that his “wish list” is so long that we’d need to be billionaires to accommodate it and that his dreams for Lego sets outweigh his pocket money, so he has also become a keen budgeter and bargain hunter.

This summer each of our children were promised a weekend activity that they choose themselves. Little Mr spent a long time thinking about it before deciding to ask for a visit to a Lego shop in Gouda.

What he really wanted was t visit somewhere that had a Lego “wall” where individual bricks could be purchased, Gouda met the criteria and he was keen to go.

Himself’s work schedule didn’t allow for a weekday visit but Little Mr found out that one shop was open every third Sunday in the month,  which is how we ended up at the “Playtoday” shop on a little street near the centre of Gouda.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

November 10, 2016

Two Doses Of Puppy Eyes… And A Swan For Good Measure.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My ninety-four year old Mother-in-Law is currently in the terminal care unit of an old people’s residence.

Himself visits almost every day, and since high school homework waits for no-one and week nights are busy, the kids and I tend to visit in the weekends.

Kiwi Daughter had a particularly tough round of school work a few months ago, so when the weekend came Himself dropped me off with Little Mr and the two of us took Oma downstairs to the in-house café /restaurant for a cup of tea.

Little Mr is particularly helpful when it comes to pushing her wheelchair and very diligent when it comes to scoring an extra sweet treat from the tiny “shop” by the restaurant.

Generally this involves asking his Grandmother first if he can have something, he then looks at me with the kid version of puppy-dog eyes,  Oma then joins in giving me the “look” whilst waiting expectantly for me to say “yes” and then gives a little knowing smile when I concede defeat. Sadly her more recent deteriation has meant visits to the restaurant have been greatly reduced, she is confined more and more to her bed as the end creeps visibly closer.  After that restaurant visit ended I phoned Himself so that he could come and pick us up and Little Mr and I went to wait outside for him to arrive.

We were soon joined by what I first thought was a goose, but upon reflection may actually be a swan, evidently hoping that we maybe had food. Little Mr wasn’t too sure about how close I should let them get, but the bird was friendly and no problem at all, even when it became evident that I had no food to give.

Little Mr was far less afraid when the cutest of tiny puppies appeared, and it’s owner  so delighted by our admiring noises that a conversation was started and Little Mr was allowed to pat the dog. We can’t have pets ourselves because both Kiwi Daughter and I have allergies to both cats and dogs, so poor Little Mr really misses out, so a small dose of  puppy / kid mutual admiration never goes astray.  Once Himself arrived, the puppy and it’s owner resumed their walk and we went our separate ways but Little Mr’s day was made.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

October 22, 2016

This Thank You Card Is As Pretty As A Picture…

Filed under: kid stuff,LIFE,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Everyone hates the problem of having the postage of a parcel cost as much as the contents in the box and it’s a constant problem of having family living half way around the world.

For my Father, living in New Zealand, it is a very big bugbear that went as deep as his Dutch roots and to be honest I really didn’t blame him.

As a consequence he didn’t do birthdays or Christmas gifts when they were younger and then in recent years progressed to sending cash in a card in the post.

That too is risky and Himself and I slowly ended up with a small bundle of New Zealand Dollar notes because he would send those instead of Euros.

We did of course exchange those with them for Euros and will use the Dollars on our next trip home but I know that giving cash was always the gift option that he liked the least because it seemed to be so impersonal.

This year he decided to do something different and announced that because some of his investments had gone well, that he really wanted to fix what he saw as a large gap in his Grandchildren’s childhood, i.e. his lack of gifts over most of their childhood. This is how each of our children came to be gifted with a large sum of money, with the stipulation that it be earmarked for past gifts and also their future education. Naturally my Father has been subjected to excited phone calls and squeals of excitement as they realized what this gift could mean.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Since Kiwi Daughter had travel plans this year, Himself and I agreed that each child would get a lump sum from this gift for all the missed Christmases’ and Birthdays of Euro 1.000,– each.

Her money went directly onto airfares and travels pocket money, and Little Mr had many ideas for his money, most of which entailed vast amounts of Lego. (vetoed by parents)

Wanting him to have something that he could both enjoy now and also keep as a legacy or investment, I started to encourage his growing interest in photography and stop-motion films.

The stop-motion subjects were of course Lego figures, scenes and dramas and we started to look at things like studio-style lights, coloured background rolls, tripods and of course a camera.

A DSLR was a better option than a pocket point-and-shoot but something like my Canon Rebel would be far too big and heavy, so a smaller model, something in between these two sizes seemed liked the best option. A new camera was an option but this is an eleven year old boy and I had no idea how mobile he wanted to be with it, or how careful, so we decided that second hand would be best. Should his photography skills and enthusiasm take off, he would grow his collection in future years or decades.

Together we went on Marktplaats (A sort of Dutch version of E-bay, but which isn’t  Ebay-nl)  and started our search. A month or so later we found a lay wanting to sell a camera, lens, some filter and a bag for a very good price.He has money left over as well (with an eye on a Go-Pro to add to his collection) Himself took care of the correspondence between us and the seller and in due course a parcel arrived with the goodies enclosed.

The first order of the day was to provide the seller (an extremely nice elderly lady needing to downsize her house, I think after the passing of her husband) with a Thank You for the equipment and for the generous price she had offered it for. As a lady now alone she did not wish to give out her postal address, but we had her email address, so could send a Thank You as an attachment photograph.  Little Mr. got to work… I have edited out identifying information, but here is his Thank You card… as pretty as a picture.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

 

 

October 20, 2016

Tissues For Laughter And…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Every parent knows that the summer school holidays can be long and difficult  for families.

During your daily routine, sometimes there is no getting away from having your kids with you in the supermarket or passing by shops that sell sweets (candy).

Invariably this ends up with the classic pleading and pester power and parents frustrated at the requests and knowing then and where to draw the line.

Our particular family have solved this problem by giving each of our kids  Euro 20,–  summer splurge sweets money. This isn’t linked in any way to regular pocket money, which in our family is dependent on kids doing set chores around the house.

In fact, this year both kids have been remarkably cheap on that front, rather this is ” summer holiday money” and is pretty much meant as confectionary money only.

Of course if we are out as a family and Himself and I decide that an ice-cream treat is in order together, then that’s separate too… their Euro 20,– is for when they have a craving for sticky, gummy, often horribly coloured stuff from the full-on sugar section of the supermarket. It’s up to them to make their choices last for as long as possible, there will be no top ups and swiftly became apparent that it was a roaring success after our first supermarket visit: they were decidedly stingy once they knew that the cost was coming out of their own pockets.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

They could also elect to forgo sweets and save this extra cash, or spend it on something else but if they did that then there was to be no asking for sweets all summer.

Spent was spent. … or as the Dutch succinctly put it “Op is op” (gone is gone). Kiwi Daughter knew exactly what special treat she wanted as part of her wish-list, something called ” Bean Boozled”.

Himself and I had never heard of them, so it was even stranger when our daughter insisted that we share some of these with her.

Definitely the more tight-fisted of our two children, Himself and I looked at each other and wondered what had come over her. It soon became apparent.

These innocent looking jelly-beans hide a nasty little secret: two will look identical but taste completely different, not just a tiny bit different either, but vastly.

The box told us that one tasted like “strawberry banana smoothie” but it’s identical mate tastes of rotten fish.  Charming.

First I tried to be smart: surely there must be some distinguishing feature to mark out the nasty from the nice. Sadly not. Kiwi Daughter railroaded us into her game and we all took turns.

This game of roulette taught me several things: firstly I am a lousy random chooser of jelly beans, managing to pick the nastier flavour 80% of the time (to her howling delight), secondly, my Daughter has an evil streak and enjoys to see our torture, almost weeping tears of laughter and lastly, the rules say you have to bite into the jelly-bean fully and have a decent try, (no demure nibbling of a micro gram) but after a while I found out that it was wiser to bite them in half and just chew half. With my terrible ratio of choices, halves were more than enough.  In the end, Have a box of tissues and a bin on hand and find out that it makes for excellent parent and kid interaction.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

October 13, 2016

No One Outgrows A Good Thing…

Filed under: GERMANY,kid stuff,LIFE,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Last summer,  at the “Im Pfenn” Restaurant in Irrhausen, Germany, we found many good reasons to recommend this place as a place to visit.

Our stop was a short one, just a lunchtime break as we headed back to The Hague after our holiday near Stadkyll but it’s clear that the town caters for longer stopovers as well since the place is  hotel as well.

The car parking area was across the street from the restaurant and negotiating my way on crutches means that I am usually the last one back to the car.The kids bounded ahead, leaping over a small fence at the front of the car and into a park that comprised a  rectangular grass area with a playground at one end of it.

Even before I got close I heard squeals of delight: the kids have discovered that this isn’t just a stock standard swing and slide playground, this one has a mini climbing wall for little ones looking to test out their more adventurous moods, a play fort, an outdoor table tennis table and a generous seating area under the trees so that parents can keep an eye on proceedings from the shade.The kids were not all out in full sunlight though, lots of the play equipment was also located under the trees.

The first squeals originate because the kids discover that what looks at first to be a regular swing, is actually one designed to swing the kid in a standing position (complete with the clue of clear indications of  “feet” impressed into the seat).Kiwi Daughter tests it out and is tall enough that she disappears into the tree above, saving me from having to edit out her face for privacy reasons.I did need to edit Little Mr however, as he tried out the third set of swings, well, rather a yellow disk attached by a central rope that he tried out perfectly well in the sitting position but struggled to balance on standing up.

Himself assisted in getting him into the standing position, sadly lack of upper arm strength and a flexible rope meant that balance was lost shortly after the camera shutter closed.This is a small playground but one where a lot of thought has gone into the equipment provided, and even “big” kids who would usually have long outgrown this kind of thing, had a lot of fun and giggles before heading back to the car. It just goes to show, no one outgrows a good thing.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 10, 2016

The Best Advertisement Of Your Childhood…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When looking around Trier last summer, Family Kiwidutch saw what looks like a shop front that instantly made everyone stop, smile and point out things about what we see to each other.

What we first though as a shop turned out to be a Toy Museum and has an amazing sign outside it’s door that is one of the best adverts for the contents inside that I have ever seen.

Made from cast iron, the sign not only advertises the shop name, but also depicts toys of all varieties too.

We make a list of the items we could find depicted: a kite, an elephant with a trumpet, a cockerel, boat, football, spinning top, jumping jack,  a little pig on a “step” (scooter), wooden blocks, train, wooden doll.

There is also a doll in a pram, a puppet, a policeman on a rocking horse, a monkey, balls, a dice, a windmill, (something meant to be papier-mâché ?) or decorated balloon heads on sticks, and skittles.

It’s work of art, both in concept, design and finished result… it’s quirky, cheerful and beautifully describes what is inside. We don’t have time to visit on this occasion but this is exactly the type of place that I personally would love to spend some (or rather a lot of) time looking around. This sign is one of the best advertisements for the memories of childhood that I have ever seen… delightful!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: Trier / Germany

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