Local Heart, Global Soul

July 1, 2018

Cut Here —

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It just so happened that during our December 2017 journey to and from Wellington, Family Kiwidutch travelled on the same ship of the fleet of three, each way.

Some unusual markings on the walls and ceiling got me interested and I discovered:

In April 2011, Interislander sent its busiest ship, the “Aratere” on a journey to Singapore for an extreme makeover of epic proportions.

The ship was literally cut in half with a new mid-section added to allow it to carry more passengers and freight.

The ambitious project was the equivalent of cutting an eight story, 150 metre-long building in half, moving the pieces apart, inserting a new piece 30 metre section and joining it all up again.

While undergoing the extension the ship also got a new bow to improve its handling and performance as well as a major internal refurbishment with the creation of new lounge areas.”

It’s interesting to see that some information is given on the ship about the extension project and that they have given a visual help to contemplating the facts and figures with dotted lines and scissors, illustrating the literal cut and joins.

There is a fascinating YouTube video that details the process (link below) and it’s a geeky feature that some people seem to notice and enjoy, yet other walk past not even registering it’s existence. Of course as a detail fanatic I was one of the geeky ones reading up (as you do)on why dotted lines and scissors are on the ceiling of a ship.

http://www.kiwirail.co.nz/projects/major-projects/improved-aratere-ferry

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://www.kiwirail.co.nz/projects/major-projects/improved-aratere-ferry
Interisland Ferry “Aratere” Extension

https://youtu.be/5m6uvBsxLQs (YouTube link)
YouTube / “Lengthening Interislander’s Aratere Ferry” / New Zealand

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cook_Strait
Wikipedia / Cook Straight Te Moana-o-Raukawa) / New Zealand

June 30, 2018

Arty Marine Architecture…

Filed under: ART,Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Never the best of sailors, it helps if I can get outside and get some fresh air. The stunning weather of a December New Zealand summer did not exactly discourage me from lingering, so I took more photographs of the outside of the ship, “arty” studies of marine architecture. … or something like that.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 29, 2018

Sweet Or Sour?

New Zealand has it’s fair share of delicious bakery treasures. Some have their origins in our British heritage like Lemon pie (think Lemon meringue sans the meringue), others have been adapted and updated to become  more recent favourites, like caramel slice (bar). Travelling on the Interisland ferry between Wellington and Picton at the very end of 2017 we had the chance to try for ourselves. Himself’s caramel slice came this time a little modified in pie form, the filling still the sweet favourite that he loves. Given the choice between these two I will always choose the lemon, and was not disappointed: just the right amount of tartness, …Perfect!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 26, 2018

Fond Memories For A Truly Kiwi Treat…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Some items that are unique to your country of birth are difficult to describe to people who are unfamiliar with these things.

I have tried on several occasions to describe New Zealand’s ‘Jelly Tip” ice-creams to my Dutch friends but it’s taken me until this last trip in New Zealand to get a photograph.

Ice-cream is bad for my asthma so I don’t eat so much of it, usually saving it as a treat when we eat out.

At most other times I substitute water based ice-blocks on sticks. Until this photograph I was always too late in asking the kids for any photographs, the famous tips of these having already disappeared over sticky chins.

Travelling back to the South Island on the interisland ferry I finally found the perfect moment and so can this time attempt to describe these.

The bottom part is not particularly special, just plain vanilla ice-cream covered in an outside coating of chocolate, the appeal comes from the top, a frozen raspberry jelly top.

It’s not totally wobbly like jelly (jello) you make yourself but it’s also not just frozen water ice-cream either, freezing the jelly makes it into something a bit in between.

It seems to have been around “forever”, having been a favourite for my sister and I as kids, and there can not be a Kiwi around who doesn’t know them.

Little Mr. obliged me just long enough for this photograph and judging from the look on his face the next generation of Kiwi’s in the Kiwidutch household are also well and truly in love with this beloved Kiwi treat.

June 25, 2018

The Cultural And Historical Background…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post Family Kiwidutch were travelling back to the South Island on the Cook Straight ferry “Aratere”.

On board I see an updated map and information board detailing the route we are taking. In yesterday’s post I looked at as many of the geographical, and points about nature as I could.

In this post I take a look at the cultural and historical information we have been given.

On some parts of the map I see little icons of caldrons: these denote the location of former whaling stations.

The photographs are similar to those of yesterday, attempting to zoom in on various parts of the board so that I could show as much detail as possible.

Some of this information was the same or similar to stuff I have read in the past, but a lot is new to me so it’s nice to be surprised this way. “Kupe and pre-European Maori : Maori oral tradition relates how the great navigator Kupe chased an octopus all the way from Hawaiki to new Zealand. After a great struggle the octopus was finally killed in Whekenui Bay, on Arapawa island near the entrance to Tory Channel. Some local place names are associated with this event.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 Taonui-o-kupe (Cape Jackson) refers to Kupe’s long spear, Arapaoa (Arapawa Island) is said to be the scything downward arc described by his weapon, and Kura-a-e-te-au (Tory Channel) refers to the schools of red krill that represent the wheke’s blood. Little is known of early Maori crossings.

the South Island was inhabited early by Waitaha but migration patterns appear to have been all in a north to south direction. By the late 15th century the north Island tribes of Ngati Mamoe, Ngai Tara and Rangitane had all established a peaceful presence in and round the Marlborough Sounds.

Around 1650 they were followed by the more warlike Ngai Tahu, who were eventually to take control of virtually the entire South Island. The initial Ngai Tahu focus in the South Island was Kaihinu, a fortified pa (village) established on Moioio Island in Tory Channel.”

‘Te Rauparaha. – Te Rauparaha was a Ngati Toa fighting chief who led his tribe on its migration south from the Kawhia region. By the mid 1820’s he had established a stronghold on Kapiti Island and Ngati Toa had asserted its dominance over the other iwi (tribes) on the west coast of the lower North Island.

In 1882 Te Rauparaha turned his sights south and initiated a series of incursions to Rangitoto (D’Urville Island and northern Marlborough. And by 1833, Ngati toa effectively controlled the top half of the South Island following the sacking of key Ngai Tahu pa (villages) at Kaikoura, Kaiapoi (near Christchurch) and Onawe (Banks Peninsula).

Although Ngai Tahu subsequently recovered most of this territory, much of the Marlborough Sounds was virtually depopulated as a result of the wholesale slaughter and cannibal feasting that accompanied Te Rauparaha raids. In June 1843 Te Rauparaha was again a key player in the “Wairau Affray”, an unfortunate confrontation between Ngati Toa and a party of European settlers, under a magistrate and captain Arthur Wakefield.

The magistrate intended to arrest Te Rauparaha and his lieutenant Te Rauparaha on charges of arson, in relationship to their attempts to stop the New Zealand Company surveying disputed land. In the event 22 European and 4 (it is thought Maori) lives were lost, the European total including a number taken prisoner and subsequently dispatched by tomahawk.”

‘Captain James Cook: The first European visitor to the Cook Straight area was Abel Tasman in December 1642. However Tasman neither landed nor confirmed the existence of a sea passage east of the Pacific Ocean. Captain James Cook first arrived in Cook Straight during his circumnavigation of the North Island on his first voyage in the “Endeavour”. He entered Queen Charlotte Sound and landed at Ship Cove on 16th January 1770.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Endeavour was careened and Cook claimed the Sound together with adjacent territories in the name of King George III, before departing to continue his circumnavigation of New Zealand on 6th February 1770.

Captain cook spent a total of 100 days at Ship Cover, visiting on five separate occasions over the course of three voyages.

On the second voyage (1773/74) he commanded the ship “Resolution”, accompanied by the “Adventure” under Captain Furneaux. On the third and final voyage (1777),

Cook again sailed the “Resolution”, this time accompanied by the “Discovery”. In December 1773, a party of 10 sailors of the “Adventure” were sent to Grass Cover (Wharehunga Bay) on Apapawa Island to collect scurvy grass. All ten were ambushed, killed and eaten by local Maori.”“Matiu (Somes) Island, Wellington Harbour. In addition to having a rich Maori heritage, Matiu or Somes Island has been at various times a human quarantine station (including a one-man leper colony), an animal quarantine station, an interment camp for enemy aliens during both world wars, a degaussing station for demagnetising ships during WW2, and home to a heavy anti-aircraft artillery battery. The Island is now run by DOC (Department of Conservation) as a scientific and historic reserve.’

“Seals and Birds”. New Zealand fur seas are common throughout the Cook Straight area, with haul out areas at Kapiti island, Mana Island, Pipinui Point Ohau Point to Cape Terawhiti, Tngue point and Sinclair Head/Red rocks. Subantartic fur seals, leopard seals, southern elephant seals are occasional visitors. A wide variety of pelagic and costal sea birds may accompany the ferry. in addition to the ubiquitous black-backed and red-billed gulls, albatross, petrel, shearwaters, terns, gannets, prion and skua may be encountered. Blue penguins and king shags are more commonly seen in the sheltered water of the Marlborough Sounds.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 24, 2018

Mapping The Cook Straight…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Cook Straight (Raukawa) is 22km wide at its narrowest point, a formidable barrier dividing New Zealand in two.

The origin and meaning of the Māori name are obscure. The English name first appeared in Cook’s chart of 1770. Captain Cook confirmed the existance of Cook Straight when, from his base in his base in Ship Cover, he climbed to the top of a hill on Arapawa Island and saw clear passage to the east. The straight can be flat, calm and peaceful.

However it is frequently subjected to strong winds with an average of 22 gales per year. The local rip tides are also notorious for both their strength and unpredictability, especially an area between Cape Terawhiti and Sinclair Head known as the Karori Rip.

One intrepid kayaker attempting to paddle the straight reputedly spent 18 hours battling tidal rips before making landfall – and that was back where he started. The strength of local tides is influenced by the fact that high water on the western (Tasman) side of the straight occurs 5 hours later than high water on the eastern (Pacific) side.

Captain Cook narrowly avoided disaster when leaving Queen Charlotte Sound in 1770. The “Endeavour” was becalmed when the wind dropped and a rip tide threatened to carry the ship onto The Brothers. Ferry passengers are not always aware that when they disembark after their voyage that they are really no further north or south than when they started. ”

“The Sea Floor: The Narrows Basin is the deepest feature at the narrowest part of the straight, with depths of up to 200 fathoms (350m). The ferry crosses close to the southern end of the basin which extends north as far as Fishermans Rock.

To the south of the map can be seen the fingers of the Cook Straight Canyon, itself a 1500m deep tributary of the Hikurangi Trench which extends from Kaikoura to East Cape. This is a southern continuation of the Kermadec Trench, part of the subduction zone between the Pacicic and Australian plates. Depths in the Hikurangi Trench reach 3000m within 80km of shore.’

“The Marlborough Sounds is the collective name given to the labyrinth of winding ridgelines, sheltered waterways and indented bays on the western side of the straight. For the past 15 million years or so these hills have been gradually tilting to the north east – a classic example of a drowned river valley system.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Queen Charlotte Sound occupies a valley that once drained into a south westerly direction through Linkwater, the Kaituna, ad the Wairau Rivers. Dotted with hundred of  “batches” (holiday homes), the Marlborough Sounds is also charactorised by numerous conservation reserves, exotic plantation forests, a marine (mussel) farming industry,  recreational fishery, and in the outer sounds, pastoral farming. The 1750 km length of coastline in the Marlborough Sounds is comparable to that of Portugal.”

“Wellington Landforms. New Zealand’s capital city lies on the boundry of the Australian and Pacific tectonic plates. In 1855, and earthquake lifted the shoreline around Wellington and Petone by 2 to 3 metres, conviently creating a raised rock platform for the construction of coastal roads and the Hutt Valley rail link.

Earthquakes probably also contributed to gradual uplifting of the former island that is now the Miramar Peninsula. The region is charactorised by several strike-slip faults, most of which are aligned along a south west – north east axis. the most prominent of these is the Wellington Fault, a key factor in the formation of both the Hutt Valley, and Wellington Harbour. The fault line is easily traced from the south coast (between Tongue Point and Sinclair Head), through the suburb of Thorndon, along the north westerns edge of the harbour and up along the course of the Hutt River”.

‘Swimming Cook Straight: A Ngati Kula woman,  Hinepoupou, is reputed to have swum from Kapiti island to Rangitoto (D’Urville island) in the mid 18th century. The swim apparently lasted 3 days and she was accompanied on her journey by a guardian dolphn called Kahurangi.  Another Maori, this time a Ngai Tahu prisoner of  Te Rauparaha, is said to have swum back to the south Island in the 1830’s.

The first successful swim of modern times was completed by Barrie Devenport in November 1962, in a time of 11 hours 20 minutes. since then the stright has been swum more than 70  times, including 3 double crossings. The fastest crossing to date took just 4 hours 37 minutes. The youngest successful swimmer was just 11 years. The swim is renowned for treacherous tides and cold water temperatures. It can be undertaken in either direction however the usual start/end points are Ohau Point on the North Island and Perano Head on Arapawa Island.”

“Whales and Whaling;  More than 20 species of whale have been sighted in Cook Straight waters. Southern right whales were so common in the early 19th century that their mating antics in Wellington Harbour caused a visitor to complain they kept him awake at night.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Commercial whaling in New Zealand dates back to the 1790’s.

However it wasn’t until the late 1820s that the first shore-based whaling station was established at Te Awaite in Tory Channel.

This was soon followed by others in Tory Channel, Cloudy bay, Port Underwood, Porirua, on Mana Island, Kapiti and its surrounding islets.

The whalers initially targeted southern right whales, but as numbers declined rapidly in the 1830s and early 1840s the focus shifted to humpbacks, sperm whales, and the occasional blue whale.

The industry continued to decline and the last commercial whale was taken by the Perano Tory Channel station in 1964. Whale numbers have since recovered, though they are still nowhere near former peak levels.

An estimated 300 humpbacks migrate northwards though the straight each winter. Southern right whales may also be seen, and there was a small population of sperm whales resident all year round. Other species sighted may include orca, common and bottle-nose dolphin.”

“Pelorus Jack – was a Risso’s dolphin tha routinely accompanied the Nelson-Wellington ferry as it sailed between French Pass and the entrance of Pelorus Sound. Something of a celebrity and tourist attraction, Pelorus Jack became, in 1904, the first dolphin ever to be protected by law.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 4, 2018

Exiting The Ferry In Darkness But With Christmas Cheer…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Wellington & Region — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Family Kiwidutch dock in Wellington after a long drive to Picton and a three and a half hour journey on one of the Cook Straight ferries. It’s dark and we still have at least forty minutes to drive. Our destination is Wainuiomata, a suburb of Lower Hutt. To get there we need to drive up the coast and over a very large hill. The last leg of this journey is always the best because we will have the warmest of welcomes from wonderful friends at the end.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I wonder how many times this campervan has been pulled over by police for a “random” check?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The route we need to drive…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

First onto the ferry, but last off…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I am delighted to see that this worker has gotten into the Christmas Spirit,  he has literally lit up his hard hat like a Christmas tree… he waved to us as well but sadly those photographs turned out completely fuzzy. He made me smile.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

A warehouse type shop, open very late to cater to the ultra last minute Christmas shopper… (or someone who wants to do some DIY during the holiday week ahead when many shops and businesses close).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 3, 2018

Into Cook Straight…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Family Kiwidutch are travelling from the South Island to the North Island of New Zealand via one of the Cook Straight ferry’s. The Arapawa Island headlands at the exit of Queen Charlotte Sound is one of the “exits” of the Marlborough Sounds and the shortest route for the Interisland Ferry’s to exit into Cook Straight. From here it is the open seas of the Straight until we get into Wellington Harbour. It can be very rough in these unsheltered waters but on this trip we were lucky.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

With the headland  (above) of Arapawa Island on our right, the view to our left on full zoom of the camera (below) becomes the receding East coast coastline. The Southern Alps have their tops wrapped a cloud, a phenomenon which earned New Zealand it’s Maori name: “Aotearoa“, (Land of the Long White Cloud).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “normal” camera view…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Dusk falls on Arapawa Island…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

We are now in the Cook Straight, one of the roughest pieces of sea in the world due to the “funnel” effect of having the expanses of the Tasman Sea on one side and the Pacific Ocean on the other. Today the weather is playing nice and our journey is smooth.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arapawa Island is the darker part on the right, the long arm of  the Tory Channel is the lighter part to the left. “Tōtaranui” (Queen Charlotte Sound) is the waterway we have just travelled which runs between the two.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arapawa Island, (large headland to the left, with Raukawa Rock in the distance. (Full zoom, the camera is struggling, especially since daylight is fading fast)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arapawa

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arapawa Island, shades of light and texture.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The sun goes down…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then with a last blaze of glory for the day…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

It’s almost completely dark by the time I took these, the interior lights of the ship have me the necessary light to see the lighthouse on the Heads of Wellington Harbour.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 2, 2018

This Coastline Slips Into My Dreams…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In December 2017 Family Kiwidutch were in New Zealand, and Christmas Eve found us on one of the Cook Straight ferries.

Although the Southern Alps of my childhood lay in the border regions of South Canterbury and Otago, and I dream of their snow capped peaks, Marlborough Sounds  feature also on occasion in my nighttime journeys.

I am attempting to draw more, so this post has two-fold purpose for me: to show our passage from the Sounds into the Cook Straight, and to give me reference material for what I hope will be one day an expansion of my artistic endeavours.

We’ve often taken the late boat over the Straight and done this section in the dark,  the weather has been less than perfect, or it has been my turn to look after our valuables at our seats below.

This time I am top-side at just the right moment. It’s a strange thing that just as I photograph the South Island slipping away into the distance in reality, in my dreams the images of this place just get stronger.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Arapawa Island  and the  Arapawa Homestead (photograph above)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

To the right of us: Arapawa Island…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

May 1, 2018

Cruising Through The Marlborough Sounds…

Filed under: Interisland Ferry,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Directly before Christmas Family Kiwidutch find themselves cruising on the Interisland ferry though the beautiful islands and inlets of New Zealand’s Marlborough Sounds. Located in the very north of the South Island, these Sounds hide many tiny beaches and holiday houses, only a small fraction of those are visible on our route, and only a small fraction are accessible by road. Yachts and boats are the staple mode of transport here, bringing many New Zealanders to quiet, peaceful and stunningly beautiful holiday spots.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I am fairly sure that these dead trees we see are caused by possums.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Evidence of landslips from the quakes in the region and in particular, the November 2016 Kaikoura / Hanmer Springs quake.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Not just people going fishing…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Coming close to the heads, and this “exit” to the Cook Straight…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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