Local Heart, Global Soul

June 27, 2018

Wellington Harbour, As Stunning As Ever…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON,Wellington & Region — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

It’s the end of December 2017 and Family Kiwidutch have spent a wonderful Christmas with friends. Now we catch the Interisland ferry in Wellington to head back to the South Island. Wellington harbour on a beautiful summer’s day is as stunning as ever.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 25, 2018

The Cultural And Historical Background…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s post Family Kiwidutch were travelling back to the South Island on the Cook Straight ferry “Aratere”.

On board I see an updated map and information board detailing the route we are taking. In yesterday’s post I looked at as many of the geographical, and points about nature as I could.

In this post I take a look at the cultural and historical information we have been given.

On some parts of the map I see little icons of caldrons: these denote the location of former whaling stations.

The photographs are similar to those of yesterday, attempting to zoom in on various parts of the board so that I could show as much detail as possible.

Some of this information was the same or similar to stuff I have read in the past, but a lot is new to me so it’s nice to be surprised this way. “Kupe and pre-European Maori : Maori oral tradition relates how the great navigator Kupe chased an octopus all the way from Hawaiki to new Zealand. After a great struggle the octopus was finally killed in Whekenui Bay, on Arapawa island near the entrance to Tory Channel. Some local place names are associated with this event.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 Taonui-o-kupe (Cape Jackson) refers to Kupe’s long spear, Arapaoa (Arapawa Island) is said to be the scything downward arc described by his weapon, and Kura-a-e-te-au (Tory Channel) refers to the schools of red krill that represent the wheke’s blood. Little is known of early Maori crossings.

the South Island was inhabited early by Waitaha but migration patterns appear to have been all in a north to south direction. By the late 15th century the north Island tribes of Ngati Mamoe, Ngai Tara and Rangitane had all established a peaceful presence in and round the Marlborough Sounds.

Around 1650 they were followed by the more warlike Ngai Tahu, who were eventually to take control of virtually the entire South Island. The initial Ngai Tahu focus in the South Island was Kaihinu, a fortified pa (village) established on Moioio Island in Tory Channel.”

‘Te Rauparaha. – Te Rauparaha was a Ngati Toa fighting chief who led his tribe on its migration south from the Kawhia region. By the mid 1820’s he had established a stronghold on Kapiti Island and Ngati Toa had asserted its dominance over the other iwi (tribes) on the west coast of the lower North Island.

In 1882 Te Rauparaha turned his sights south and initiated a series of incursions to Rangitoto (D’Urville Island and northern Marlborough. And by 1833, Ngati toa effectively controlled the top half of the South Island following the sacking of key Ngai Tahu pa (villages) at Kaikoura, Kaiapoi (near Christchurch) and Onawe (Banks Peninsula).

Although Ngai Tahu subsequently recovered most of this territory, much of the Marlborough Sounds was virtually depopulated as a result of the wholesale slaughter and cannibal feasting that accompanied Te Rauparaha raids. In June 1843 Te Rauparaha was again a key player in the “Wairau Affray”, an unfortunate confrontation between Ngati Toa and a party of European settlers, under a magistrate and captain Arthur Wakefield.

The magistrate intended to arrest Te Rauparaha and his lieutenant Te Rauparaha on charges of arson, in relationship to their attempts to stop the New Zealand Company surveying disputed land. In the event 22 European and 4 (it is thought Maori) lives were lost, the European total including a number taken prisoner and subsequently dispatched by tomahawk.”

‘Captain James Cook: The first European visitor to the Cook Straight area was Abel Tasman in December 1642. However Tasman neither landed nor confirmed the existence of a sea passage east of the Pacific Ocean. Captain James Cook first arrived in Cook Straight during his circumnavigation of the North Island on his first voyage in the “Endeavour”. He entered Queen Charlotte Sound and landed at Ship Cove on 16th January 1770.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Endeavour was careened and Cook claimed the Sound together with adjacent territories in the name of King George III, before departing to continue his circumnavigation of New Zealand on 6th February 1770.

Captain cook spent a total of 100 days at Ship Cover, visiting on five separate occasions over the course of three voyages.

On the second voyage (1773/74) he commanded the ship “Resolution”, accompanied by the “Adventure” under Captain Furneaux. On the third and final voyage (1777),

Cook again sailed the “Resolution”, this time accompanied by the “Discovery”. In December 1773, a party of 10 sailors of the “Adventure” were sent to Grass Cover (Wharehunga Bay) on Apapawa Island to collect scurvy grass. All ten were ambushed, killed and eaten by local Maori.”“Matiu (Somes) Island, Wellington Harbour. In addition to having a rich Maori heritage, Matiu or Somes Island has been at various times a human quarantine station (including a one-man leper colony), an animal quarantine station, an interment camp for enemy aliens during both world wars, a degaussing station for demagnetising ships during WW2, and home to a heavy anti-aircraft artillery battery. The Island is now run by DOC (Department of Conservation) as a scientific and historic reserve.’

“Seals and Birds”. New Zealand fur seas are common throughout the Cook Straight area, with haul out areas at Kapiti island, Mana Island, Pipinui Point Ohau Point to Cape Terawhiti, Tngue point and Sinclair Head/Red rocks. Subantartic fur seals, leopard seals, southern elephant seals are occasional visitors. A wide variety of pelagic and costal sea birds may accompany the ferry. in addition to the ubiquitous black-backed and red-billed gulls, albatross, petrel, shearwaters, terns, gannets, prion and skua may be encountered. Blue penguins and king shags are more commonly seen in the sheltered water of the Marlborough Sounds.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 23, 2018

What My Little Hobbits Required…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

Just before the New Year of 2018, Family Kiwidutch were sitting in the car waiting to board the Interisland Ferry to travel back to the South Island.

It’s early evening, the kids have grown impatient and seized upon a bag of snacks in the back of the car.

There is the usual “pass it here, but I’ll give it back, ok?” type of conversation but time passes and we are still waiting so eventually I twist around and ask for a cracker too please.

There is a rumble of disapproval from the rear of the car, “but these were for us weren’t they?”

“No, they are for everyone”… silence for a moment, then grumbles,… “ooookaaay“. Then another pause, some rustling from plastic and a few giggles before I hear a tentative: “but Mama, they are almost op’.

This is a classic Dutchlish (Dutch /English) mixing of words in sentences that our family is completely used to. ‘Op” in this instance is the Dutch interloper into the English sentence and means “gone / finished”.

Wondering just how much of a dent they have managed to make into it, I demand that they pass the package over for inspection.

The inner tray slides out, two tiny fragments rest in one of the empty tray segments.

The rest if the packaging is completely and utterly empty. I’m amazed that they managed to eat all of these so quickly.

Little Mr starts to giggle: “These are good Mama, can we please buy some more?”

The response is that of course we can

By special “permission” from my children I get to “finish the rest of the packet” which of course sounded like they were being more generous than they in fact were.]

Once on board they tucked into fish and chips with gusto, and this is after having an “early dinner’ of sorts back with our hosts earlier in the afternoon!

Apparently it’s not just a second breakfast that my little hobbits require, it’s most out of character so I can only put it down to the sea air!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 22, 2018

Another Unusual Vehicle, Or Part Of One…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

Whilst waiting in line at the Wellington ferry terminal to board the Interisland ferry,  we see this strange looking truck. Well, it’s the cab in the front that looks unconventional: in fact it seems to be a specially made sort of “tug” that can shift the back end of articulated trucks to load them on and off the ferry without needing the regular truck cab to be present.  This one was unloading a New zealand couriers semi trailer and it looks like it deposited it somewhere  further up the terminal for collection later. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen anything looking like this, so it’s a new type of vehicle for my collection.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

June 21, 2018

Another Trip, This Time Southwards And Home…

The time has come to leave Wainuiomata behind us. I have had a rest, Himself took our hosts and their extended family members on what turned out to be a six hour car ride to see the hill with the longest place name in the world. The name is: ‘Taumata­whakatangihanga­koauau­o­tamatea­turi­pukakapiki­maunga­horo­nuku­pokai­whenua­kitanatahu” and I have a link to that post from our last visit below. It was a tiring day for our friend with cancer but he hadn’t actually felt up to any substantial outing for months and months so he was equally excited about enjoying a day out and tired upon their return. Little Mr and I decided to stay home and have a “chill” day, I needed a rest after several busy days and walking in the Petone Settlers museum the day before. I also knew we needed to leave shortly for the trip back to Christchurch and I would have my fill of car journeys. Now we say some misty eyed goodbyes and head back over the hill towards Wellington for the last time this trip. At least the rain has passed by and it’s a glorious day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2012/03/20/new-649/
Truly a Mouthful for The Guinness Book of Records…

June 15, 2018

Not Quite A Certificate Of Truth…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned a few posts ago that the Centennial celebrations that took place in New Zealand in 1940 were heavily balanced in favour of Pākehā (white) settlers who had more or less comfortable lives, land, jobs and social mobility.

Maori on the other hand, had less access to higher education, social, economic, and financial opportunities so the sweeping statements that generalized the ideal that everything was rosy in paradise was far from the truth, Ugly truths were swept under the carpet and a bright smile was exhibited for the outside world.

There is no point in pretending that all was wonderful in New Zealand in the 1940’s but it’s also an ideal that was the product of its time, and I hope that we have come a long, long way from that situation in 2018.

Purely from an artistic point of view I was attracted to this document, a “New Zealand Centennial Exhibition, Certificate of Attendance November 1939.” which was on display at the Petone Settlers Museum when Himself and I visited just after Christmas in 2017.

I like the mixture of western and Māori motifs and the central figure that reminds me a little bit of the female figure from the Colombia Pictures Film company logo.

In 1940 New Zealand was of course still heavily bonded with “Mother England” so the cape-like flags that fall either side of the figure feature even a fraction more of the Union Jack than they do of the New Zealand flag.

The illustration is very much of its time, but it is the inclusion of the Māori and very “New Zealand” motifs around the border and illustrated within the central panel of the certificate that I like the most.

I’m also struck that it’s a very “official” looking document for something seemingly as mundane as an entry ticket, especially when I read the accompanying information: “The jewel in the centennial crown was the New Zealand Centennial Exhibition. Running from 8 November 1939 to 4 May 1940, it sprawled over 55 acres of land in Rongotai, Wellington. 2.5 million visitors came to the event, at a time when New Zealand’s population was only 1.6 million people.

Obviously with 55 acres the physical size of the exhibition meant that it could not be covered completely in one day, so many people probably did half one day and the other half in subsequent days, helping to tot up such massive admission numbers.

With rumblings of war in Europe, the mood of patriotism was probably very high at the time as well as many New Zealand young men prepared to fight for “Queen and Country”. Who knows, many of those young men may well have come to Wellington to join ships sailing for Europe and visited the centennial Exhibition before departure. It’s an interesting piece of art, which if you think deeper about it represented in fact many lies told at the time to both Māori and Pākehā, many of which sacrificed their lives for “Mother England” within a very short time of this Exhibition.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petone_Settlers_Museum
Wikipedia / Petone Settlers Museum / History / New Zealand

June 2, 2018

Kōwhai, Another Amazing Mural…

Filed under: ART,Mural,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Another mural in the Wellington area is of one of New Zealand’s most beautiful flowers, the Kōwhai.

I think it’s a huge pity that the painters of this piece did not use the actual colour of the famous flower: a brilliant bright yellow gold instead of the sombre black they decided on for these walls.

If you are unfamiliar with the Kōwhai I strongly suggest you Google it because it is a stunning plant.

Our visits have always been out of season so sadly I have no photographs of my own to show you.

The Kōwhai in the garden of my parents’ house in Christchurch would have its branches bent almost to the ground under the weight of its blooms around the month of August.

It’s a flower that is both insect and bird friendly and a special favourite of the New Zealand Fantails and Bellbirds, the song of both we heard often through open windows or when outside.

The Scarlet Cianthus, is called Kōwhai-ngutu-kaka, or “Parrot’s beak,” by Maori due to the shape of its rich flowers, but does not carry any special association in their folklore.

One traditional Maori explanation for the Kōwhai’s singular habit of flowering on bare and leafless branches goes:
“On the shore of one of a lake, sat a young Maori man and a woman, the beautiful Kotiro. He sought her for his wife, but the maid laughed and said she’d see; she would wait until her suitor—who was an Ariki of high rank, performed some great and deed before she would become his wife. She would wed none but a famous man, a man whose exploits no one could outdo. The lover accepted the challenge. “You shall see what I can do,” he said, He turned to the tree under which they were sitting. It was a Kōwhai. It was August. The tree was quite bare of both flower and leaf.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“I shall cause this tree to spring into flower before your eyes.”

He put forth the command taught him by wise men. And, all in a moment, a miracle! The tree burst forth into a blaze of blossom.

All its naked boughs were covered in a breath with golden hanging flowers. The amazed girl saw, and was smitten.

Ever since that day, says the Maori, the Kōwhai has flowered on leafless branches, a sign and a reminder of the ancient miracle.

Wikipedia also tells us:
“The Kōwhai is a native tree and the national flower of New Zealand.

Several of the seven varieties reach a height of up to 25 metres (82 feet), the smaller varieties to around 10 metres (33 feet).

Traditionally Kōwhai trees and flowers were used by Māori in making yellow dye, the bark to treat bruising, muscular pains and other injuries.”

Apparently too: “If someone was bitten by a seal, an infusion (wai kōwhai) was prepared from kōwhai and applied to the wounds and the patient was said to recover within days”. (yep, I’ll be sure to remember that if I’m ever bitten by a seal).

The hard yellow seeds are poisonous to humans, but the flowers are a guaranteed way to attract native birds into your New Zealand garden, Kōwhai necter being a bird favourite. The peculiarity of this loveliest of our small flowering trees is the fact that it produces its blossoms before the leaves. The flower also makes an appearance on local artwork, in folktales, and it’s featured on postage stamps, as well as the country’s old two-cent coin.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Golden Kowhai – A Folk Tale of the Maori // James Cowan
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Gov03_07Rail-t1-body-d12.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kōwhai
Wikipedia / Kōwhai Tree and Flower / National Flower / New Zealand

June 1, 2018

This Fish Gets A Thumbs Up…

Filed under: ART,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Quirky Design,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

Whilst driving around Wellington, New Zealand, I saw this little fish and chip shop. Look at the sign: I mean, a fish wearing a hat leaps out of the water to give you a wink and a thumbs up… What’s not to like?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 31, 2018

Don’t Ruin Land, Sky Or Sea…

Filed under: ART,Mural,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , ,

This next Wellington mural perplexed me at first because we sped by in the car and it wasn’t at first obvious what was being depicted here. Later, on the computer I see that there is a text in the top right corner that says “New Zealand, worth loving’ and that there is something behind the dolphin. That “something” is a large ship, container or oil freighter size of ship, and that scene shows one of the propeller blades cutting a dolphin clean in two. It’s a gruesome reminder that the ships that deliver the conveniences of our modern life also have a detrimental impact on the inhabitants of the oceans they cross. I can only hope that a more environmentally friendly method of future transport can be found, one that doesn’t ruin land, sky or sea.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 30, 2018

Delightful, Beautiful, Charming…

Filed under: NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,WELLINGTON — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There are many buildings in Wellington, New Zealand that give us an instant look into our past.

Weatherboard houses, small neighbourhood shops with verandas, stone pubs or civic buildings with beautiful decorative elements used to be the norm.

They extended into the very heart of the city; but time passed, tastes, technology changed, “materialism and consumerism” erupted and suddenly far bigger shops were needed to display these goods.

In the remaining little shops many of the stone decorative elements (stone balconies lining the shop front roof for example) are long since removed because they posed earthquake danger, many of these beautiful little buildings were removed to make way for department stores, pedestrian arcades of shops and on occasion further into the future; malls.

In the Wellington suburbs I managed to capture a little bit of “original Wellington”, delightful, beautiful, charming and ornate buildings, which I can only hope survive the onslaught of “progress”.

The message on the side of the first building says: “You are a guest of nature -Behave” It’s a message we should remind ourselves of daily.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.