Local Heart, Global Soul

March 6, 2018

Planting The Idea That… I’m A Fan!

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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I am no gardener (in fact it’s a wonder that anything survives when I am tending to it) but I love the form and pattern of plants. I love trees, palms, ferns, all sorts of foliage. I say to myself that I collect photographs to draw later, but I do very little drawing these days and mostly I just take the photographs because I adore the forms of the plants. I particularly like the palm trees that I saw around Singapore in December 2017, I am not certain but from what my parents told me of ones they had in their garden in the Solomon Islands, I think the common name of this one is “fan palm”. I saw other varieties of palms in different parts of the city and the light meant that they were best shown off in silhouette, their leafy shapes were still instantly recognisable and well… you will have to excuse the pun, … of all palms, I’m a fan!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 5, 2018

Side-Stepping The Image, But Not The Issue…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Just before Christmas 2017, Family Kiwidutch visited Singapore, and on this occasion took in the views from the “Singapore Flyer” observation wheel.

Himself sat out the actual ride, heights being very much not his thing, but was pleased to wait for us below.

As usual I was busy with my camera, looking for new things to photograph and enjoy. One of these things is the delightful way that people take existing items and turn them into something else.

For example, here at the base of the Flyer, is a wide passageway that features quite a few large columns.

I delight in the fact that in this multi-cultural and multi-religious State, there appears to be no controversy or objection to actually naming the various religious events.

The banners say “Merry Christmas” rather than “Happy Holidays”, there are “Happy New Year” banners even though a vast majority of the population in Singapore will celebrate the Chinese New Year (16th February 2018) instead.

I have no problem to promote special days in the calendar of religions other than my own either. I need assistance to get to work, so my work pays for a taxi. Both of my regular drivers are Muslim and the one who has been driving me for a long time is a friend outside of our working hours.

I have no problem to talk about religion to them, we respect that each of our faiths is different, but peace and respect are central. I will let God judge everything else.

We have celebrated Eid (the feast that celebrates the end of Ramadan) with them and learned a lot about the traditions that are important to them. Here in Singapore the columns have been decorated in Santa’s and figures from the Nutcracker, the rain / shade umbrellas outside are decorated with tinsel and baubles.

There is even a large Christmas image on the floor that has a strange 3-D effect.

It was funny because  waiting for a small group of people to pass and to get a better shot, I noticed that only one person was willing to walk directly across the image, everyone else took an extended side route.

I think it was a case of your mind telling you that of course it was flat, the image is only an illusion, but our eyes rebel and in the end we prefer to side on the caution that our eyes dictate and side-step just in case.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

March 4, 2018

Sitting On Big, Bold, Beautiful Forms…

Here’s another “arty” type post from the Singapore Flyer building. In the area between the ticket office and the place where you go up to go onto the observation wheel, is a seating area. Of course I would not be featuring them if they were “just seats”. These ones are bright and quirky, and in a design that catches the eye. I dare presume that they are also seen by young children and toddlers as excellent climbing equipment, or for that game where the child feels compelled to complete a full circle of something, possibly holding the hand of a parent: similar to walking the length of low walls.
It’s not just a kid magnet either, plenty of adults appear to have made themselves comfortable too. Most of all it is quirky, and who doesn’t love quirky? In art I am more a lover of texture, line and pattern. Others art lovers like these too but prefer big, bold, beautiful forms, full of colour. To those people, this post is especially dedicated.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 3, 2018

Arty Koi…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Himself sat out the ride on the Singapore Flyer, the heights of things such as tall Observation wheels really not being something he enjoys. Sat more comfortably on terra firma in the cool surrounds of the Flyer building indoor / outdoor tropical rainforest garden, he enjoyed a quiet break. Later, when he and Kiwi Daughter went off the collect cold drinks, Little Mr. and I paused to take a look at the fish in the gardens pools. I love how the patterns of the water, the combination of opacity and transparency. light and shadow interact with the different colours of the Koi fish. I could imagine one or two of these photographs as studies for impressionist style paintings. An “arty” post therefore… Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

March 2, 2018

Building… A Lotus Flower?

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There is one building that I have neglected to look into in adequate detail, when viewed I it from the Observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

Now I view it again from the Singapore Flyer observation wheel and want to know more.

Wikipedia tells me: “This building is the “ArtScience Museum”, a museum located within the integrated resort of Marina Bay Sands and the Downtown core of the central area of Singapore.

Opened on 17 February 2011  it is the world’s first ArtScience museum. Although it has a permanent exhibition; the ArtScience Gallery, the ArtScience Museum mainly hosts touring exhibitions curated by other museums. The architecture is said to be a form reminiscent of a lotus flower and was designed by architect Moshe Safdie.

The ArtScience Museum has 21 gallery spaces with a total area of 50,000 square feet (6,000 square meters).

Rainwater is harvested and channelled down the centre of the building, flowing through its bowl-shaped roof into a reflecting pond at the lowest level of the building. The rainwater is then recycled for use in the building’s restrooms.

The permanent exhibition, the ArtScience Gallery, consists of three galleries – Curiosity, Inspiration, Expression.

The ArtScience Museum promises to feature 21 gallery spaces equating to 50,000 square feet (6,000 square meters) which will display exhibits from combined art/science, media/technology, as well as design/architecture motifs.

Permanent exhibits include objects indicative of the accomplishments of both the arts and the sciences through the ages, along the lines of Leonardo da Vinci’s Flying Machine, a Kongming Lantern, and a high-tech robotic fish. The museum opened with an exhibition of a collection of the “Belitung shipwreck” cargo, and Tang dynasty treasures that were discovered and carefully preserved by Tilman Walterfang of Seabed Explorations NZ Ltd.

Tilman Walterfang and his team found the Tang dynasty artifacts in the Gaspar Strait in 1998 among the wreck of the Belitung shipwreck, a large 9th-century Arabian dhow wrecked around 830 AD. For the next six years, they were desalinated, conserved and researched by his company Seabed Explorations Ltd in New Zealand. They were eventually purchased for around 32 million USD.

The exhibition will include sufficient items to ensure that the collection on tour will reflect accurately the assortment and magnitude of the find and its global inter-cultural significance, as this is the single largest consignment of Tang Dynasty export goods ever discovered. The find includes some of the oldest cobalt-blue-and-white ceramics made in China, several gold items made with Arabic designs and swastikas, jars filled with spices and incense resins, bronze mirrors, thousands of glazed bowls, ewers and other fine ceramics, as well as lead ingots. The pièce de résistance of the exhibition is a small cache of magnificent, intricately tooled vessels of silver and gold, which remain unparalleled in quality and design from the period.”

This building, whilst modern in every way, captivates me with it’s style, imagination and beautifully curved lines. I like the lotus flower analogy, and is surely modern architecture at it’s best.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArtScience_Museum
Wikipedia / Science Museum / Singapore

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belitung_shipwreck
Wikipedia  / Belitung shipwreck / ArtScience Museum  / Singapore

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

March 1, 2018

Structures And Patterns…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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The Singapore Flyer is a marvel of engineering. I’m not blessed with a mathematical or technical mind, I just appreciate this from the perspective of someone who likes patterns, lights, darks and shadows. I like the lines, the way things fit beautifully together. I don’t need to know the intricacies of how they managed it, I just like that fact that they did. This post is all about the structure of this beautiful structure… enjoy.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 28, 2018

Lucky With The Weather For Amazing Views…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sitting in the tallest Observation wheel in the world is a less scary experience than I imagined it might be.

Unlike a cable car there is no swaying or jolting, the ride on the Singapore Flyer is so smooth that most of the time I didn’t even notice we were moving.

It wasn’t the wheel that reminded me that we moved either, just that whatever I was looking at was slipping out of view and something else was coming into view and grabbing my attention.

Having just come from the Marina Bay Sands Hotel Observation Deck, it might seem that I was doing the same thing twice, and whilst in a way I was, each viewing of the surrounding city felt completely different.

I’d recommend both in a heartbeat.

Of course the weather makes or breaks a visit to both, but that is in the lap of the Gods, you have good luck if you are there at the right moment, bad if you don’t.

We were very lucky indeed, about two and a half hours after we left here the dark clouds closed in, thunder rumbled and the heavens opened in a deluge of tropical rain that lasted at least a few hours.

Luckily by that time Family Kiwidutch were back at the Swiss Club, had had a swim and were about to sit down to a leisurely early evening meal with our Singaporean friend “Velvetine”. Sometimes it is just down to luck.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 27, 2018

Capturing But A Fraction Of The View…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The views from the Singapore Flyer are amazing, everywhere we look there is something new to see.

In fact the more we look, the more detail we see, and the wheel keeps turning, so we can capture but a tiny fraction of it before it is out of view.

I try to estimate that if you arrived with  long telephoto lens, how many journeys on this wheel would you have to make on this wheel before you captured all of this detail?

I think that the answer is, even if you estimated a very high number, it would probably be far below the number of journeys you’d really need.

Himself is sitting this journey out.

He said he could join us but due to his fear of heights he would not be enjoying himself even a tiny bit, so it would be a complete waste of the price of a ticket.

There is a tropical rainforest garden at the bottom of the wheel and he decided that he would enjoy a quiet moment there far more. I think he even managed a short nap. I would do this ride again in a heartbeat, I am not sure if I could Himself to join me in the future, but I would try, especially since it would be possible to sit in the seats in the center and enjoy the amazing views without getting too close to the windows and looking down. In the meantime, sadly he is missing out on a fabulous experience.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Remind you maybe of a certain brand of chocolate bar?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 26, 2018

Views From The Flyer…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Going up in the Singapore Flyer observation wheel, Kiwi Daughter, Little Mr. and I get a new perspective on some of the landmarks we have just seen from the observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

The hotel is taller than the wheel, but that doesn’t mean that the views from the Flyer are any less.

In fact the fact that the Flyer is moving in height in small increments during it’s forty or so minute journey, gives us some different angles on the same buildings and makes the photographs very interesting indeed.

Or at least that’s my opinion on it.

Here we see the Gardens by the Bay, Supertrees, Marina Bay Sands Hotel, ships in the Straight awaiting unloading, the Barrage, and even one of the “Duck” boats (On Tour with Darla Duck? ) and activities going on in the bay.

I zoom in with the camera as much as I can to get close ups of them, the angles are almost limitless.

I do have a far larger lens, one which would zoom in on the sandwich one of the passengers  of the Duck was eating (that’s hypothetical, I didn’t see any passengers eating sandwiches because my zoom wasn’t good enough) but you get the idea.

This larger lens is heavy, needs a tripod, and I’m still bruised by the expense so I don’t really yet dare to take it out on trips, especially ones as long as this one. The views are amazing, and we may have just chosen an excellent  time to visit because heavy rain and thunderstorms were forecast for the afternoon and we already see dark clouds closing in on the horizon.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Theatres that are nick-named the “Durian’ because of their shape. On our last visit we heard from our Duck boat guide that due to all of the odd angles, these windows can not be washed with any sort of mechanical machine. They are therefore all washed individually by hand.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Zoomed in on the Barrage…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I see the “Duck” boat / vehicle on the water…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and yet more (but different0 views of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2012/01/17/new-578/
On Tour with Darla Duck?

February 25, 2018

An Inside View Of The Flyer’s Cabin…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Singapore Flyer cabins are pleasantly large, and the style of the construction with large windows gives an excellent view outside.

The only downside is that there is sometimes a reflection in the glass, which can be best combatted by putting the lens as close to the glass as possible.

That was rather restrictive at times, but this is also one of these times when you have to accept that photographs are a poor substitute for actually seeing the view with your own eyes.

At least there are only five of us in the cabin, Kiwi Daughter, Little Mr and Myself, plus the two gents we were sharing the cabin with. The cabins are built to  accommodate twenty-eight people comfortably.

For us however, there were no crowds pushing for the best position, or hogging one spot where the view of a specific building or area was at it’s best.

In unspoken agreement with our fellow visitors we just moved quietly around, not spending too long in any spot, sharing the cabin as best we could.

At one point we found that all five of us were at the same end of the capsule so I took the opportunity to try and get a photograph of as much of the inside as possible.

There are long seats in the center of the cabin, so I can also just rest and take in the view as well. Of course I also take photographs of the other cabins, they make for beautiful architectural studies, seemingly “floating” as we go around. I don’t want to try and get my head around how the mechanics of how these capsule / cabin / pods manage to make a journey in a full circle, with barely a hint of movement, in an upright position all the way. Let’s just call it magic.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the photograph below, the Marina Barrage can be seen, cutting the bay from the sea.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

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