Local Heart, Global Soul

March 5, 2018

Side-Stepping The Image, But Not The Issue…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Just before Christmas 2017, Family Kiwidutch visited Singapore, and on this occasion took in the views from the “Singapore Flyer” observation wheel.

Himself sat out the actual ride, heights being very much not his thing, but was pleased to wait for us below.

As usual I was busy with my camera, looking for new things to photograph and enjoy. One of these things is the delightful way that people take existing items and turn them into something else.

For example, here at the base of the Flyer, is a wide passageway that features quite a few large columns.

I delight in the fact that in this multi-cultural and multi-religious State, there appears to be no controversy or objection to actually naming the various religious events.

The banners say “Merry Christmas” rather than “Happy Holidays”, there are “Happy New Year” banners even though a vast majority of the population in Singapore will celebrate the Chinese New Year (16th February 2018) instead.

I have no problem to promote special days in the calendar of religions other than my own either. I need assistance to get to work, so my work pays for a taxi. Both of my regular drivers are Muslim and the one who has been driving me for a long time is a friend outside of our working hours.

I have no problem to talk about religion to them, we respect that each of our faiths is different, but peace and respect are central. I will let God judge everything else.

We have celebrated Eid (the feast that celebrates the end of Ramadan) with them and learned a lot about the traditions that are important to them. Here in Singapore the columns have been decorated in Santa’s and figures from the Nutcracker, the rain / shade umbrellas outside are decorated with tinsel and baubles.

There is even a large Christmas image on the floor that has a strange 3-D effect.

It was funny because  waiting for a small group of people to pass and to get a better shot, I noticed that only one person was willing to walk directly across the image, everyone else took an extended side route.

I think it was a case of your mind telling you that of course it was flat, the image is only an illusion, but our eyes rebel and in the end we prefer to side on the caution that our eyes dictate and side-step just in case.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

March 4, 2018

Sitting On Big, Bold, Beautiful Forms…

Here’s another “arty” type post from the Singapore Flyer building. In the area between the ticket office and the place where you go up to go onto the observation wheel, is a seating area. Of course I would not be featuring them if they were “just seats”. These ones are bright and quirky, and in a design that catches the eye. I dare presume that they are also seen by young children and toddlers as excellent climbing equipment, or for that game where the child feels compelled to complete a full circle of something, possibly holding the hand of a parent: similar to walking the length of low walls.
It’s not just a kid magnet either, plenty of adults appear to have made themselves comfortable too. Most of all it is quirky, and who doesn’t love quirky? In art I am more a lover of texture, line and pattern. Others art lovers like these too but prefer big, bold, beautiful forms, full of colour. To those people, this post is especially dedicated.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 3, 2018

Arty Koi…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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Himself sat out the ride on the Singapore Flyer, the heights of things such as tall Observation wheels really not being something he enjoys. Sat more comfortably on terra firma in the cool surrounds of the Flyer building indoor / outdoor tropical rainforest garden, he enjoyed a quiet break. Later, when he and Kiwi Daughter went off the collect cold drinks, Little Mr. and I paused to take a look at the fish in the gardens pools. I love how the patterns of the water, the combination of opacity and transparency. light and shadow interact with the different colours of the Koi fish. I could imagine one or two of these photographs as studies for impressionist style paintings. An “arty” post therefore… Enjoy!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

March 1, 2018

Structures And Patterns…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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The Singapore Flyer is a marvel of engineering. I’m not blessed with a mathematical or technical mind, I just appreciate this from the perspective of someone who likes patterns, lights, darks and shadows. I like the lines, the way things fit beautifully together. I don’t need to know the intricacies of how they managed it, I just like that fact that they did. This post is all about the structure of this beautiful structure… enjoy.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 27, 2018

Capturing But A Fraction Of The View…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The views from the Singapore Flyer are amazing, everywhere we look there is something new to see.

In fact the more we look, the more detail we see, and the wheel keeps turning, so we can capture but a tiny fraction of it before it is out of view.

I try to estimate that if you arrived with  long telephoto lens, how many journeys on this wheel would you have to make on this wheel before you captured all of this detail?

I think that the answer is, even if you estimated a very high number, it would probably be far below the number of journeys you’d really need.

Himself is sitting this journey out.

He said he could join us but due to his fear of heights he would not be enjoying himself even a tiny bit, so it would be a complete waste of the price of a ticket.

There is a tropical rainforest garden at the bottom of the wheel and he decided that he would enjoy a quiet moment there far more. I think he even managed a short nap. I would do this ride again in a heartbeat, I am not sure if I could Himself to join me in the future, but I would try, especially since it would be possible to sit in the seats in the center and enjoy the amazing views without getting too close to the windows and looking down. In the meantime, sadly he is missing out on a fabulous experience.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Remind you maybe of a certain brand of chocolate bar?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 26, 2018

Views From The Flyer…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Going up in the Singapore Flyer observation wheel, Kiwi Daughter, Little Mr. and I get a new perspective on some of the landmarks we have just seen from the observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

The hotel is taller than the wheel, but that doesn’t mean that the views from the Flyer are any less.

In fact the fact that the Flyer is moving in height in small increments during it’s forty or so minute journey, gives us some different angles on the same buildings and makes the photographs very interesting indeed.

Or at least that’s my opinion on it.

Here we see the Gardens by the Bay, Supertrees, Marina Bay Sands Hotel, ships in the Straight awaiting unloading, the Barrage, and even one of the “Duck” boats (On Tour with Darla Duck? ) and activities going on in the bay.

I zoom in with the camera as much as I can to get close ups of them, the angles are almost limitless.

I do have a far larger lens, one which would zoom in on the sandwich one of the passengers  of the Duck was eating (that’s hypothetical, I didn’t see any passengers eating sandwiches because my zoom wasn’t good enough) but you get the idea.

This larger lens is heavy, needs a tripod, and I’m still bruised by the expense so I don’t really yet dare to take it out on trips, especially ones as long as this one. The views are amazing, and we may have just chosen an excellent  time to visit because heavy rain and thunderstorms were forecast for the afternoon and we already see dark clouds closing in on the horizon.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Theatres that are nick-named the “Durian’ because of their shape. On our last visit we heard from our Duck boat guide that due to all of the odd angles, these windows can not be washed with any sort of mechanical machine. They are therefore all washed individually by hand.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Zoomed in on the Barrage…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I see the “Duck” boat / vehicle on the water…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and yet more (but different0 views of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

https://kiwidutch.wordpress.com/2012/01/17/new-578/
On Tour with Darla Duck?

February 25, 2018

An Inside View Of The Flyer’s Cabin…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Singapore Flyer cabins are pleasantly large, and the style of the construction with large windows gives an excellent view outside.

The only downside is that there is sometimes a reflection in the glass, which can be best combatted by putting the lens as close to the glass as possible.

That was rather restrictive at times, but this is also one of these times when you have to accept that photographs are a poor substitute for actually seeing the view with your own eyes.

At least there are only five of us in the cabin, Kiwi Daughter, Little Mr and Myself, plus the two gents we were sharing the cabin with. The cabins are built to  accommodate twenty-eight people comfortably.

For us however, there were no crowds pushing for the best position, or hogging one spot where the view of a specific building or area was at it’s best.

In unspoken agreement with our fellow visitors we just moved quietly around, not spending too long in any spot, sharing the cabin as best we could.

At one point we found that all five of us were at the same end of the capsule so I took the opportunity to try and get a photograph of as much of the inside as possible.

There are long seats in the center of the cabin, so I can also just rest and take in the view as well. Of course I also take photographs of the other cabins, they make for beautiful architectural studies, seemingly “floating” as we go around. I don’t want to try and get my head around how the mechanics of how these capsule / cabin / pods manage to make a journey in a full circle, with barely a hint of movement, in an upright position all the way. Let’s just call it magic.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the photograph below, the Marina Barrage can be seen, cutting the bay from the sea.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 24, 2018

Getting To The Flyer Capsule…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

After being put on board one of the Singapore Flyer’s capsules with almost military efficiency from the staff. The cabin is far larger than I imagined it would be and we shared the cabin with only two other gentlemen.

There was more than ample space for everyone to take photographs and enjoy the experience without getting in the way of the others.

Wikipedia tells me:

“Design; Built on a 33,700 m2 (362,700 sq ft) site along the Marina Promenade and designed by Arup and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the wheel has a capacity of up to 7.3 million passengers a year.

The wheel the normally constant rotation of the wheel means that a complete trip lasts approximately 32 minutes.

The Flyer’s 28 air-conditioned capsules are mounted outboard of the rim of the wheel structure, providing continuously unobstructed views.

Each capsule has a floor area of 26 m2 (280 sq ft) and is capable of holding 28 passengers, or up to five wheelchairs and 15 other visitors when booked in advance for use by disabled guests.

The wheel initially rotated in a counter-clockwise direction when viewed from Marina Centre, but on 4 August 2008 this was reversed on the advice of Feng shui masters.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Staff get visitors on board very promptly! (the Wheel doesn’t stop for you, so you have to have your wits about you).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

February 23, 2018

Singapore Flyer Entrance…

Filed under: PHOTOGRAPHY,SINGAPORE,Singapore Flyer Observation Wheel — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch arrive at the Singapore Flyer and are immediately struck by the size of the wheel.

Having had a view of it from the Observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands, we see that it towers over the surrounding landscape, but the sheer scale of by how much, does not hit you until you are standing close by.

The outside area where the ticket office is located looks slightly underwhelming.

In fact it is so nondescript that the thought crossed my mind that it could be a side entrance to a shopping mall. However all thoughts of mediocrity were wiped away the moment we went a short distance inside.

We see a three story building where the wheel actually turns within a section of the structure, and the beauty and simplicity of the design are stunning.

The wheel is located on the upper levels, leaving a balcony style first floor and an open atrium in the centre. Within this central space are waterfalls, ponds, sitting areas and to the side, food stalls, but it is still the wheel that dominates, capturing your attention.

Getting to the wheel itself is slightly less straight forward. Using the wheelchair, I had to take a few detours of the less direct route to lifts but we got there in the end.

There is a whole area before you arrive at the passenger capsules which is kind of an exhibition area, we cherry-picked stopping to look at the bits we thought were interesting, mostly those bits where there were less tourists.

I am sure that part of the reason for this more extended entrance is to keep queuing tourists “occupied” in high season (school holidays and the like) when, I detect from the layout it appears there must be very long queues and sometimes a lengthy waiting time.

Wikipedia tells me: “Opening in 2008, The Singapore Flyer is a giant Observation wheel in Singapore. Construction took approximately about 2½ years. It has 28 air-conditioned capsules, each able to accommodate 28 passengers, and incorporates a three-storey terminal building.The Flyer has an overall height of 165 metres (541 ft) and was the world’s tallest Ferris wheel until the 167.6 m (550 ft) High Roller, which is 2.6 m (9 ft) taller than the Flyer, opened on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, US, on 31 March 2014.

The previous record holder, the Star of Nanchang, in Jiangxi, China, is 160 m (525 ft) tall, although its 153 m (502 ft) diameter wheel is larger than the Flyer’s 150 m (492 ft) wheel. Early designs showed a 169 m (554 ft) tall wheel similar to the London Eye, drawing criticism that it lacked originality. The developers pointed out that the design was not finalised and was merely for conceptualisation purposes, though the final project changed little from the early designs. Subsequently, the project almost ground to a halt when the developer faced difficulties in sourcing funds to build the wheel.

Original plans to complete the wheel by the end of 2005 were thus postponed indefinitely, and there were reports (denied by the Singapore Tourism Board) that the tourism board has set an ultimatum date of 31 March 2005 for the developer to iron out its financial issues and to keep the development going.
By September 2005, the project was revived when funds were successfully sourced from two German banks. Collin William Page, a subsidiary of ABN AMRO, and HypoVereinsbank.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Flyer
Wikipedia / Singapore Flyer / Observation Wheel / Singapore

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