Local Heart, Global Soul

November 30, 2012

Ingredient Search: Shortening

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In my quest to recreate a “proper” Kiwi-style meat pie in the Netherlands , I’ve come up against a few obstacles.

One of them was obtaining metal baking forms to get the classic pie shape. After searching high and low in the Netherlands (understandably) without success because there is no meat pie culture here,  I put it these baking forms my shopping list for our next trip to New Zealand and subsequently bought some in Christchurch New Zealand.

The other thing I was having trouble finding was shortening… a.k.a. lard.

Incorporating a small amount of shortening/lard into your shortcrust  pastry is what gives a flaky crisp bite to the crust rather than a soggy weak doughy mush… but finding shortening was turning out to be more of the hassle than I first thought.

First I asked in the supermarket… big mistake. I was directed to a block of  “bakboter ” which I know is a sort of cooking butter that I know my aunts like to fry meat in. I really didn’t think sounded right for my pastry at all but the lady pulled over a colleague and they both  insisted that this is what shortening was in the Netherlands.  I took some home and made pastry with it on more than one occasion… the pastry survived and was edible but it was light-years away from my Kiwi meat pies in taste.

Knowing that my pastry still wasn’t right my next step was to contact a butcher… and confirmed that what I needed wasn’t bakboter, but  “reuzel” (translates literally as pig or beef fat, lard, shortening).

I now have reuzel sourced from several butchers… if you want to get hold of some, be warned that some butchers no longer stock it because demand is so low these days.

Some would order it for me, one butcher said he only stocks a packet or two at a time and we got the last packet.  Another butcher had two packets and we took both. In all instances the reuzel  was frozen, so be prepared to buy it when you can get  back home in time to get it  into your freezer before it thaws.

One packet cost about Euro 2,50 for 250 grams, the other two at roughly the same weight (pictured in blocks) was a bit cheaper.

Ok, it’s fat, but shortening is also fat (just with a more politically correct name) and yes I have made several test-runs of pastry with shortening in it. The taste was a lot like the classic Kiwi meat pie that I’ve been missing from home.

Bearing in mind that making the pies is labour intensive and is nowhere on any health-food list,  I won’t be making them very often, but when I do I want them to taste like the real thing  and not some lacklustre  imposter, so I figure that the use of a little bit of shortening can be excused now and again.

So if you want to make  savoury pie with a crisp and flaky shortcrust pastry,  get friendly with your local butcher and find yourself some reuzel .

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My recipe called or half shortening and half margarine…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 2, 2012

Feeling, Tasting and Seeing Harmony…

Filed under: FOOD,MALAYSIA,Melaka,PHOTOGRAPHY,Specialty,Traditional — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

You are turning another page in my retrospective diary of our travels to New Zealand earlier this year.

We are now on our way back home  to the Netherlands but have a long stopover of almost a week in Singapore to visit with a fellow Foodie and good friend that I first met on the internet who I’ll call here by her internet nickname “Velvetine”.

Together we have made a side trip from Singapore and have taken a three hour bus trip to Melaka, Malaysia where we have  been visiting the Cheng Hoon Teng temple but now after waiting a while for one straggler in our group who was busy seeking her fortune with “lucky sticks”, we all spill out onto the street to start a walking tour and see the city centre.

The street we are on is  officially called  Jalan Tokong Besi  but it’s also known as “Harmony Street”  because on it and standing in harmony are the places of worship of the three main religions of Malaysia.

These consist of the Cheng Hoon Teng Temple that we have just visited, which was buit in 1645, and is the oldest chinese Temple in Malaysia. Just a short distance down the street is the Kampung Keling Mosque tht was built in 1868 and looks like no other mosque I have ever seen before.

It’s a tall tower of a building some six stories high, very square in shape and has a sight pagoda look to it, actually I asked the guide if it was a Japanese building and when she told me it was a mosque I was quite surprised. It’s a stunning piece of architecture, with pure simplicity that draws your eye straight up the tower to the top.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The last of the trio is the Sri Payyatha Vinayagar Moorthi Temple which, built in the late 1700’s is the  oldest Hindu temple in Malaysia but which sadly I didn’t manage to grab a photograph of.

I find it amazing that two of these building are the oldest of their type in all of Malaysia and that they are situated in the very same street… brilliant!

Don’t you just wish at all religions could so peacefully co-exist in their own “harmony streets” everywhere in the world as they do here?

Of course I’m captivated too by the street scenes all around us… there is so much to see.

The decorations for the upcoming Chinese New  Year,  street vendors, a freezer full of ice-cream  grabs the full attention of my children, and  for my lens too since these ice-creams are  egg-shaped and come in rounded clear plastic containers.

Then there was the table of durian sweets… but the one I really wished we could have had time to stop and try, a local speciality that our guide pointed out and explained: chicken rice balls, which consists of rice cooked in chicken stock and molded into balls. We are told that come evening time there will be a long queue outside this establishment for these rice balls,  touted as one of the best in Melaka are very popular with locals and tourists alike.

Darn, I wish we could have stayed longer… I want to try it all (ok, maybe not quite so fast on the durian… but those chicken rice balls were definitely calling me). Let’s take a look…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 29, 2012

Savouries and Goodies to Take Home…

Filed under: FOOD,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Reviews,Specialty — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Himself and the kids have been very patient out the front of the bakery as they wait for me to complete my tour…

I watch as other savouries: sausage rolls, pasties and the like are sorted out the back and then make my way to the front counter to buy some goodies to take back with us.

Celia has a surprise for me… a gift box with four raspberry buns and some apricot pies!  Wow,  talk about “the icing on the cake”!  To say I’m delighted with our  unexpected gift is an understatement.  Fantastic!  Thank You so much Celia!!!

I’m also clutching the address of the place where I can buy pie forms to bring back to The Netherlands…  this visit has exceeded my expectations on so many levels  that it’s made my day.

The only shock has been walking back to the van parked just a short distance down the street and seeing so many gaps where buildings used to be. Before I got into the car I looked around, closed my eyes for a moment and tried to remember what  used to be in the gaps, with some I succeed but with others I draw a blank. It’s good to see other businesses here open though… and  people, the whole area is busy with people.

No matter what life (or Mother Nature) throws at you,  the owners and staff of Sydenham Bakery and all the other local businesses here  prove that they are resilient and with support from locals they are willing to pick up the pieces and get back to normal as much as possible.

One thing I’m certain about too… once fortified by a pie and a raspberry bun, you feel like you can take on the world.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 28, 2012

I’m in Pie Heaven…

Filed under: FOOD,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Reviews,Specialty,Traditional — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Welcome to my retrospective journal of our trip earlier this year to New Zealand.

Celia of  Sydenham Bakery in Christchurch New Zealand,  is showing me around the working  areas of the bakery.

I tell her that pies are a firm favourite of ours but that since they are not an item that features in Dutch cuisine that I’ve been attempting to make some myself at home, with limited success to date.

One problem that I have is that I can’t find little metal pie forms in the Netherlands, so Celia gives me an address of a catering supplier in Christchurch where I can buy some of the little forms to take home with me.

I did pick some up, they look exactly like these ones do and they are fabulous to use but you have to be very careful because the top edge is very sharp:

…that’s deliberate because once you have lined your pie form with pastry, filled it and placed the top on, all you have to do is to roll your rolling pin over the pie form and the sharp edge cuts and trims any overlapping pastry for you and results in a lovely uniform edge.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I can however attest to the fact that these sharp edges will also cut very nicely into fingers whilst doing the washing up, so baking these with kids would have certain limitations.

The bakery of course bake hundreds of pies per day so their pie forms have been welded into joined sheets so that  dozens can be baked in commercial ovens at a time.

Of course I know there’s no chance of scoring a recipe but after talking to Celia I realise that one of the things I’ve been doing wrong with my pies is that I’ve been using shortcrust pastry for both the top lid and the bottom shell,  when it should be shortcrust for the bottoms and puff pastry for the lid on the top.

Naturally not having a proper pie form also means that it’s no surprise that my versions haven’t been cooking very evenly and that I haven”t  yet got past the problem of the dreaded “soggy bottom”  in my pastry making,  although I did read in one of my cookbooks that baking pies on a rack closer to the bottom of the oven should help with this problem too.  In the meantime I’m in pie heaven… just look at the pie production going on here!  From production to the pie warmers out in the shop front so that customers and come and buy one that’s already hot…   Fabulous!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

September 25, 2012

From That First Raspberry Bun Until Now… Sydenham Bakery.

Filed under: LIFE,NEW ZEALAND,PHOTOGRAPHY,Specialty — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When I first started my first  job in the centre  of Christchurch. I was still living at home and would walk the length of Colombo Street to and from work.  I  therefore passed the Sydenham Bakery twice a day and would look fondly in the shop window as I went past.

My Grandparents, and sometimes my parents, used to stop there every so often to buy soft white,  raspberry buns, apricot pies, Boston buns or slices but only as a really special treat, so for me…  a typical sweet toothed kid, treats that happened not nearly often enough!

I worked all week in town, walking every day past the bakery and at the end of my first working week  the “pay lady” did the rounds and handed out a very small,rectangular brown envelopes to all the staff.

Inside mine were the bank notes of  my first pay, a few coins at the bottom to complete the balance and a crisply folded  pay-sheet that detailed what I’d earned Gross, Taxes paid and the Net balance. The figure on the bottom line wasn’t particularly much but there was more cash in that tiny envelope than I’d ever held before in my life.

I was so proud of my first pay-packet,  dreamed of saving for world travels and walked in the direction of home as if on air. I walked over the Colombo Street over-bridge,  the railway tracks were  busy with trains, freight wagons and carriages and Christchurch’s main  (err…only) Railway station with the tall clock tower was a short distance away.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There were the favourite shops that I would pass in Sydenham on my walk south… the  second hand furniture shops, the photographer’s,  the printing place,  Church, Post office and park with Nazareth House in the distance and on this occasion I knew I would be making a special stop on the way home from work.

I entered the Sydenham Bakery and after a short deliberation bought a raspberry iced bun.  It was my first purchase my my first weekly pay and I was as delighted with my new financial independence as I was with my iced bun.

It’s the sort of day you remember all of your life, and every time I walked past Sydenham Bakery I would look in the window and remember that day and that feeling with a smile.

Since my wages were low and my travel dreams were large I forwent the bus and walked to and from work every day except  the very worst of winter days,  saving my bus fare and watching my travel fund grow. Every now and again I would go inside the bakery and try something new… eventually the apricot pies caught my attention and became as firm a favourite as the raspberry buns.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Years later, when my planned three month trip to the Netherlands to renew my Dutch passport unexpectedly became a more than twenty year residence, my visits to Sydenham Bakery were confined to infrequent visits back to Christchurch, but I was still in the habit of leaving their premises with a purchase of raspberry buns and apricot pies in my hand.

Then the earthquakes came and kept coming… I was as stunned and shocked as all New Zealanders, both at home and abroad. In September 2010 I was relieved that there was no loss of life, In February 2011 I grieved along with the nation as two people I knew perished amongst the 182 fatalities.

Also gone were many of my favourite haunts, and uncertainty reigned about businesses damaged and if they would stay and rebuild or move on to other places.

I contacted Sydenham Bakery via  an internet noticeboard and expressed my hope that they were all ok and wondered if  they intended repairing their damaged premisses:  telling of my fond memories and first pay-packet purchase. To my surprise Celia from Sydenham Bakery contacted me with an invite to visit her next time I was in New Zealand. We’ve been in email contact during the intervening months and set up this appointment.

So here I stand outside the Bakery… so many memories and emotions of past years and recent events, so many of the familiar surrounding buildings have been demolished.  Time to go inside…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 25, 2012

Flip-Flopping Around the Issue of Pavlova…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There are always rivalries between neighbouring countries, and New Zealand and Australia are no exception.

For the majority of the population of course it’s an easy-going good natured thing… Kiwi’s have their fair share of jokes where the Auzzies are the butt of their humour and of course visa versa and it’s interesting that if a New Zealand sports team are paying Australia I’ll be cheering loudly for the Kiwi’s but I’m happy to switch allegiances and cheer for the Auzzies if for instance they are playing the Brits.

(Nations “down-under”should stick together after all LOL).

One area where Kiwis and their Australian friends are destined to never  agree however is whenever the topic of  the Pavlova dessert comes up. I did some research and Wikipedia (amongst other sites) tells me:

Professor Helen Leach, a culinary anthropologist at the University of Otago in New Zealand, has compiled a library of cookbooks containing 667 pavlova recipes from more than 300 sources. Her book, “The Pavlova Story: A Slice of New Zealand’s Culinary History”, states that the first Australian pavlova recipe was created in 1935 while an earlier version was penned in 1929 in the rural magazine.

The Aussies claim that  Bert Sachse created the dish at the Esplanade Hotel in Perth, Australia in 1935. In defence of his claim as inventor of the dish, a relative of Sachse’s wrote to Leach suggesting that Sachse may have accidentally dated the recipe incorrectly. 

Leach replied they would not find evidence for that “because it’s just not showing up in the cookbooks until really the 1940s in Australia.” (However, a 1937 issue of the Australian Women’s Weekly contains a “pavlova sweet cake” recipe.)

Of such arguments, Matthew Evans, a restaurant critic for The Sydney Morning Herald, said that it was unlikely that a definitive answer about the pavlova’s origins would ever be found.

“People have been doing meringue with cream for a long time, I don’t think Australia or New Zealand were the first to think of doing that.”   The first known recorded recipe named “pavlova” was published in the fifth Australian edition of Davis Dainty Dishes in 1926. However this “pavlova” recipe was not meringue based, but was instead a multi-coloured gelatine dish.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Meanwhile on the New Zealand side of the ditch… “Research shows the recipe originated in New Zealand. Keith Money, a biographer of Anna Pavlova, wrote that a hotel chef in Wellington, New Zealand, created the dish when Pavlova visited there in 1926 on her world tour.”

For me as a Kiwi, it’s simple: the Kiwi’s made it first… yes the Aussies might have had something they “called” Pavlova but since it was a cake or a gelatine dish then sorry it isn’t  the light and airy baked meringue treat covered in cream and fresh fruit that we know Pavlova as today…

…and as for the the argument  that the Auzzies “may have accidentally dated the recipe incorrectly”  ?  Sorry,  that’s totally implausible, and given that no Australian cookbooks carried the recipe until close to a decade  later, the well known Kiwi phrase “yeah right!” springs to mind.

I know there will be some Auzzies reading this, and I know you may well disagree…(you are most welcome to your own opinion, so we may agree to disagree) but for me this one is as clear cut as can be, since Anna Pavolova was actually visiting Wellington  in 1926 on her world tour.

The hotel chef invented  the dessert because  he was inspired by her tutu, draped in green silk cabbage roses.  The basic shape of the tutu was provided by a meringue case, while the froth of the skirt’s net was suggested by whipped cream.  To achieve the effect of the green roses the enterprising chef used slices of kiwifruit, then known as Chinese gooseberries.

Apparently it is also  mentioned in Anna Pavlova’s biography that she had the dessert made for her in Wellington… (but to be honest I haven’t read Pavlova’s biography so can’t verify that one myself). So there you have it … Pavlova… a very New Zealand  icon!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

And now to the last New Zealand icon on the Kiwiana wall: the Jandal !

If you are not a Kiwi then your reaction to the word “jandal” is probably ” A What?”, accompanied by a puzzled expression.

Ok… let’s explain, you may know the Jandal well, but  in your neck of the woods it may well be called a “flip-flop“or a “thong” or “zōri“.

These articles of footwear  have been around since the times of the ancient Egyptians and some in various shapes and made from a variety of materials depending on the version of them that many cultures have.

One thing they have in common though is the strap that comes between the wearers big toe  and the other toes to hold them on, and the “flack, flack, flack” noise that they make when you walk in them.

Jandals are Kiwi summer-ware… what better shoes do you need in order to walk over hot beach stones or sand in the height of summer?  Great for getting changed in public swimming pool changing rooms, and easy to slip on when you need to walk down the drive to collect the morning newspaper or the post from the mailbox.

But…. many an Australian on holiday in New Zealand has come unstuck when trying to go shopping for jandals. In Oz they call these “thongs” so  invariably asking directions for these in a New Zealand shop has found them being led into the lingerie department and presented with a selection of  skimpy underwear.

My Dutch father has never lost the Dutch term (“Slippers”)  for these shoes either, and I can remember being embarrassed more than once as a teenager  as he called out to me  in front of my friends “remember to put your slippers on when you go outside“.  Of course now I know he was being cautious because I’m allergic to bees and I used to love walking barefoot on the grass, but my friends used to think it was hilarious and made plenty of jokes about it  that I didn’t quite appreciate being the butt of at the time.

July 10, 2012

Drool and Dream of “Dreams”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Now there’s a building that’s pretty hard to miss whilst passing through Maungaturoto…

…even when I first saw it out of the van passenger window and it was persisting down with rain, it was still a head turner.

Luckily we have the opportunity to come back on a sunnier day and Kiwi Daughter and I take a look inside.

Dreams is a gift shop and is like an emporium of amazing bits and pieces.

Kiwi Daughter’s two “bestest” friends would each celebrate their birthdays whilst she was away in New Zealand so she was shopping for something to post to them as a surprise.

I was shopping for some cute baby things for a good friend who’s baby was due pretty much the same time our plane was due to touch the tarmac as we headed back in The Netherlands and since babies have a habit of being unpredictable in their arrival schedules I thought it wise to already have something in my hand luggage in case he arrived in The Netherlands sooner than we did.

And yes, shopping for a new arrival is fun at any time, in any country so  hey what a brilliant excuse to go shopping here!  It’s a hot and humid day when we visit and stepping into the cavernous cool of this building is refreshing and relaxing.

Naturally I also saw a ton of stuff that I would have carted home if  “home”  had been closer than 16.000,– kms away, as I instantly fell in love with lots of  ironwork items, and beautiful things in glass, wood and stone.

Sadly I would need my own jumbo-jet to lug it all back to the Hague and oh,… the small technical detail of an abode that would need to be at least three times as big as our present apartment to fit it all into.

Oh well seems I’ll just have to drool from afar and dream of Dreams.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 9, 2012

Welcome to My Afternoon Tea Party …(Oh I wish!)

In my final post about Sunshine Organics in Maungaturoto I’m looking at some of the backing on offer… I’ve caught them on their first day open after the Christmas/ New Year holidays so they don’t yet have their usual selection up to speed, but what I do see looks very tempting.

There are savoury muffins,  a fruity carrot cake that’s dairy and egg free, coconut and orange syrup cake, a health slice and chocolate muffins… YUM!  It’s inspiring me to see that “organic” doesn’t have to mean plain or boring and would be welcome at any first class afternoon tea party!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 7, 2012

Blues and Red Hot Blues… WOW!!!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sunshine Organics in the small town of Maungaturoto in Northland New Zealand is the place where I found these next gems

Blue tortilla chips are made from blue organic corn  (ALL new  discoveries for me!) and are to die for!

We tried the Blue chips first and thought “ooooh Bliss!!” … Then we tried the Red Hot Blues and I had to pinch myself to see if I hadn’t actually died and gone to heaven.

Just enough heat to make you go weak at the knees and have your taste-buds soar but  not so much that it rips your insides to bits… perfection!

I’m not mobile enough to go looking for these here in The Hague, but once I am this is the item I’d hang just out of arms reach in front of the treadmill and be prepared to walk kilometres for. … or just say heck and grab the bag and make myself decadently comfortable with the bag on the sofa LOL.

Annoyingly I was sure I’d photographed the makers details on the back of the package but can’t find the photo anywhere at the moment… but if I find it later I’ll  be sure to slot it into this post.

I dare you to find the nearest organics shop to you JUST for the hope that they stock THESE CHIPS   (at the very least) … you won’t be sorry!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 5, 2012

Taking Back Control Over What’s in Your Food…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

You are still leafing though the pages of my journal as I retrospectively detail our travels to New Zealand during December 2011 and January 2012.

I’m delighted to have discovered a wonderful organics shop in the small town of Maungaturoto and after explaining that I have a blog, am a foodie and have a deep interest in promoting the good news of small businesses making a positive difference in their communities,  the owner was delighted to let me take as many photographs as I wanted and for me to feature her business here.

As usual I didn’t waste any time getting clicking and asking as many questions as possible.  One of the food problems that has seen a massive rise in people suffering from gluten intolerance.

I knew a few rough facts about gluten: it comes from wheat and from my few attempts at bread making I knew that kneading the dough releases the gluten and in theory (if only I could get it right) would help my bread rise nice and high in the oven and produce a light fluffy texture inside the loaf.

Then some years back,  a long time Christchurch friend and her husband extended their family buy taking on long term care of a foster child… who turned out to suffer from Coeliac’s disease and can not tolerate gluten.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

When their family and ours ate together it became apparent that gluten is in many products where you would least expect to find it and this young girl’s diet was far more limited than I ever expected. Did you know that soy and tomato sauce or ice-cream have gluten in them?

No? I  didn’t either. Apparently it’s stabilising agent and as such is added to a whole host of  food products, and my friend has had to become a label vigilante in order for this child to not have severe adverse reactions to things she eats.

Like asthma, the occurrence  of  Coeliac disease seems  to be rising at an alarming rate, especially in children, so finding certified and trusted gluten-free products is fast being a necessity for many families rather than a supposed fad amongst a few people that society first supposed were getting a little too fanatical about their food.

I hear that the demand for gluten free products in the shop is rising, and probably as word gets out about this new business, more people will come and shop here, knowing that they can get everything from their gluten-free flour and general gluten-free products and baked goods under one roof.

I also discover something close to my heart: organic cleaning products, something I’m currently experimenting with since several commercial washing powders and most commercial cleaners wreck havoc on my lung condition and asthma.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I have also sported the “bloated lobster” skin reaction look after trying many  new commercial soaps and make-up products,  so I’m delighted to find an entire range of organic cosmetic product and toiletries here too.

It’s nice to see that a shop like this has won an award for Excellence, it becomes instantly clear that the owner shares my concerns about what the food industry is hiding in our food and that an ever increasing number of people are wanting to cook “from scratch” with healthy ingredients so that they can regain some control over what’s in the food they are eating.

Sadly gone are the days when we can just assume that the corporate food giants have our best interests at heart when they sell us their products as time and again investigations are proving that tricks like adding sugar to products that never traditionally contained any is causing many people’s bodies to become addicted to sugar. This has a knock-on effects of making healthy diets hard to stick to and obesity an epidemic.

Himself and one of our friend’s severe reaction to the pine-nuts that I documented in yesterday’s post tells me that even one simple product obviously contains much more than is first apparent, and that financial profit is a bigger motive for decisions within the food industry than concern for the health of the customers who consume it.

Getting “back to basics” as a home cook is the first step of re-taking control of  our waistlines, our blood pressure and our own life expectancy, but we also need to recognise the need to be very careful that we are not cooking from scratch with tampered ingredients,  and  therefore lulling ourselves into a false sense of security that we are getting healthy when we might not be.

Clearly ditching the supermarket is going to be near impossible, but at least having a greater awareness and changing our lifestyles one tiny product at a time should be possible both on a financial and practical level.

This place and places like it are a brilliant resource for getting back to basics with safer ingredients…  so let’s take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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