Local Heart, Global Soul

November 9, 2016

Excellent Lunch And The Best Seats In The House…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This summer  in the “Knus”,  a cafe / restaurant located in the “Delftse Hout” I found something to add to my “dream house if money were no object” list.

Since Himself and I are both allergic to winter, it stands to reason that this house would be somewhere with a warm climate, and what is nicer on a hot sunny day than relaxed al fresco dining with friends and family?

With skin cancer running in the family,  a general knowledge that excess sunshine is bad for your skin and that slapping on sunscreen regularly is messy and inconvenient, I always opt for the easy option: shade.

The problem with sun umbrellas, no matter how large, is that the movement of the sun means that a couple of changes of position are usually necessary, and seating a large group can be problematic.

On a good hot day like this day we were in Delft,  and with a group of ten, I was delighted to find my dream seating dining area.

It was a large recessed area with a small hedge around it as a wind break, benches, seats and tables around the edges, and large timber supports holding up an overhead canopy.

The toddler and smaller children were also effectively “corralled” by this arrangement which provided a natural play area with this natural boundary.

With all of the tables free when we arrived, we were able to pick the ideal spot with enough sunshine and shade to suit everybody and we didn’t have to worry about chasing reluctant kids with sunscreen for a while.

The cushions on the seats were an added quirky bonus: the kids busy swapping them around as they decided it was most important that the sit on ” an orange, or a slice of watermelon”.

Lunch is both adult and kid friendly: various salads and kid favourites like toasted sandwiches.

Everyone adored the food and every crumb was demolished.

In my ideal dream home scenario however, I would make two small changes to this seating area: first add a ramp instead of steps, and second, add retractable mesh screens so that evening dining does not attract mosquitos and and other unwelcome guests. For the rest I just need to bring a tape measure and confirm my ideal dimensions… oh, and wait for our one lottery ticket per month to come good.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Knus // Delfts park restaurant

November 8, 2016

One of Delftse Hout’s Best Kept Secrets…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This summer we met up for a Saturday lunch with two sets of friends in Delft.

The location is in “Delftse Hout” a wooded are just outside Delft, and the place is called “Knus”,  a café / restaurant  that is located in the middle of a recreation area.

As well as a large playground for small children, there are things like canoeing on offer so it’s a popular meeting spot for families.

Our three families have kids that range in age from toddler to teenager so it was nice to have something to please everyone.

This Saturday had stunning weather too so to say it was busy here was an understatement.

First we scored a table next to the kids playground but it was a table really meant for two, maybe two at a push and there were ten of us.

Also it was in a spot without shade and even after a five minutes waiting for the others it become uncomfortably warm. Then the first of our friends arrived and let us know that there was also a spot out the back, at the rear of the restaurant. Before we take a seat though I take a look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Restaurant: Knus

 

 

 

March 28, 2016

Starting The Day And Using Our Planet Wisely…

On our last morning of our surprise weekend away last summer, we head with our friends to the on-site restaurant for the breakfast that can be paid for as part of your stay. Since the accommodations at De Vreemde Vogel (The Strange Bird) only have tea and coffee making facilities and we are packing up to leave later on, we have opted for the short walk to the restaurant rather than find a bakery. In keeping with the reduce, reuse, recycle ethos here, the path leading to the restaurant is lined with fruit trees, vegetables and herbs. Next to the terrace tables there are several swings and a chestnut tree with some new but spiky chestnuts which make interesting photographic subjects. Breakfast is a simple but completely adequate affair made with local ingredients and we left satisfied and with smiles for the new day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

De Vreemde Vogel / The Strange Bird

March 7, 2016

Kiwi Berries / Kiwibes … A New Find And Delicious Treat!

The first evening we spent at the “De Vreemde Vogel” (The Strange Bird) in Vlaadingen, we decided to have a combined family picnic dinner. One of the contributions that our friends bought to the table was something that I have never seen before. It’s a teeny tiny kiwifruit, hairless and going by the name of “kiwibes” which literally translates into English as “kiwi berries”. I haven’t seen them since in my local supermarket, but since we went later in the summer it is possible that these have a limited season and of course since they are new, they are probably not yet produced in large volumes anyway. Either way I will be on the lookout for these in the future because they are sweet and totally delicious. A quick rinse and they are ready to eat, no peeling no mess, just a mouthful of deliciousness! If ever you see them I highly recommend that you give them a try.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

De Vreemde Vogel / The Strange Bird

February 11, 2016

Brownies And Downies: A Brilliant Idea !

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Back on April 29th 2014, I wrote a post about a café that we had been recommended and subsequently tried out.

The name of the place was “De Haagse Traiteur”  and Himself and I went there several times, and Kiwi Daughter went with friends on another occasion.

I also wrote a blog post about it: De Haagse Traiteur; The Menu Might Be Small But It’s Beautifully Formed… .

Later in 2015 one of our neighbours had some news for us, this establishment had closed down.

Himself and I were really disappointed fearing that the economy had not been kind and regretting that we had not visited there more often.

Then we heard the real reason that this establishment was no longer trading: the owners had been the lucky recipients of a large lottery win, one big enough that they had decided to sell up and move on to other things.

I have no clue just how big the win was or what the new lives of the former owners entailed, but the good news is that now the place has reopened under new management and of course gained a new name: “Brownies and Downies” , and what’s more this is no ordinary new start-up café.

The “Brownies” part of the name is fairly self explanatory, one of the cafés specialities are Brownies, but what’s special is the “Downies” part: this café provides employment for people with Down’s Syndrome and helps them to be  functioning part of the working community.

Most of the Down’s Syndrome employees work part time and they have assistance from non-Down’s adults who run the management side of things. Himself and I think it’s a brilliant idea and are just so sorry that it’s taken so long for us to find out about it and come and try it out. The interior is very similar to that of it’s predecessor establishment, but a few changes have also been made. There are large wooden letters in different colours on the tables: some of the staff with Down’s find it easier to remember the colours than the letters or numbers, everything in the small details are done to try and make things as easy and stress free for the staff as possible so that they can focus on accomplishing their serving tasks as well as possible.

When I ask permission to take photographs I am told that written permission has been given by the parents of the young Down’s people who work here for photographs to be taken. Himself’s tea is quality loose tea which is carefully served into the pot by our waitress, with a little help she gives us great service and the food is good too. Since Himself has had a lot of work in and we can not stay for too long, I order a brownie to take home, it is boxed for us to take with us and I get instructions to give a minute in the microwave because it’s even better served slightly warm. They are not wrong. I was too busy eating it later to get a photograph but it was definitely worth getting some to bring home. Back at the café I have a toasted sandwich and Himself an uitsmijter, which is a traditional Dutch item consisting of a fried or poached egg on top of ham and toast and served with a mustard cheese sauce. As soon as Himself has a break in his mountain of work we plan on going there again.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The words on the pot below translate as “seize the day” …

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

November 20, 2015

Wow! I’ve Found My Desert Island Meal…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Earlier in the year we went away for a long weekend to the Landal Colderhoven holiday park in the Veluwe.

We left after the Friday school day and after negotiating the weekend traffic, arrived in the early evening.

The kids had a few tiny snacks in the car but we limited them, wanting them to eat a decent dinner once we arrived.

The suitcases had hardly hit the bedroom floors in the holiday house when the cries of hunger were emitted in earnest from my offspring and Little Mr’s friend who has joined us for the weekend.

There is a restaurant on-site at the park and we decide to leave the unpacking for later and head over for a meal. To our surprise the place is almost packed to capasity already, but we ask if they perhaps have a table for our group of five without a reservation and breathe a huge sigh of relief when they say yes. In the next fifteen minutes or so, the place is full and people arriving without a reservation are being turned away, so we have been very lucky. As usual I tell our waitress about my allergies and it turns out that there are quite a few dishes featuring mushrooms so she highly recommends the Japanese salmon entree to go with my schnitzel main course. All of the meals were delicious, far better than the other Landal Parks we have been to, but the absolute highlight of the menu was without doubt the Japanese salmon entree.

It arrived in a preserving jar with a layer of smoke still visible in the jar, the idea was to let that “rest” and disappear and only open the jar once the smoke had gone, in the meantime there was a small side salad with a pipette containing the dressing (both amazing) and the preserving jar rested on slivers of length-wise shaved cucumber marinated in vinegar and sugar. Opening the jar reveals the softest and tastiest fish I have had in all my life, and it was so good I think I could easily name it as one of only three things I would take to eat on a desert island, or in my top three meals of all time. This is seriously good. In fact I would persuade Himself to go back to this park on the basis of this dish alone. Needless to say the meal was a hit, the two smallest kids demolished the “Bollo” meals which arrived far earlier than meals chosen from the adult menu and they both disappeared off to the large bouncy mat that was a short distance away and in sight of our table. How they could bounce on full stomachs don’t ask me, but they managed to entertain themselves on the play equipment until it was time for dessert.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

November 12, 2015

Stroopwafel Taart… A Step By Step Tutorial

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Nothing is more typically Dutch than Stroopwafels.  They can be found in every Dutch supermarket,

there are mini versions, the double biscuit (cookie) version, cheap ones and expensive ones.
If you are really lucky though, you might be on the street and find a vendor making and selling fresh Stroopwafels, these are in an entirely different league, soft, chewy, warm sticky caramel dripping delicacies of deliciousness.

My personal favourite is the double biscuit version because I find the other types overly sweet, my children, given half the chance (increased if visitors have come to stay) inhale as many of any sort as they could get their hands on and Himself likes all varieties but does moderation far better than the children do.

A few years ago I was musing about other ways to enjoy these biscuit treats, and wanting a really different dessert, decided to try a sort of ice-cream cake using these as the main ingredient. Not having a recipe I just eyeballed the ingredients and made it up as I went along.

This is a recipe where no stove-top or oven cooking is necessary but it would be handy to have a really large bowl or even a large saucepan to mix things with. You will also need some thick rubber gloves because you need to use your hands and things get very cold and messy.

I have a Tupperware container in my cupboard that contains rubber gloves of the washing-up variety which I only ever use for food. They come out if I am cooking and prepping beetroot (beets) for bottling (canning), and whenever I have to mix a lot of ingredients by hand.

Before I start with the ingredients, I first need to line a low sided pie dish with cling film, so that I can get the taart back out of it later.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Open several packets of Stroopwafels, using the thicker double-sided biscuit ones as well as the normal ones, added to a food processor and reduce to crumbs. Split this crumb mixture into two parts, reserving one half for use later in the recipe.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Put half of the crumbs into a large mixing bowl, add half a cup of white caster sugar, a teaspoon of ground nutmeg, and enough margarine, approx 2 heaped Tablespoons to form the mix into a dough that holds together. (I took these photographs on an occasion when I made two of these at once and didn’t have quite enough stroopwafels, so added come plain biscuit (cookie) crumbs… Maria’s, Graham crackers, Vanilla or Round Wine biscuits would all do).

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Next, press your cookie dough mixture into your low sided pie dish, covering the base and curving the mix up the sides to reach to top of the dish. If the weather is warm, refriderate to firm up the mix until the next step is completed.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This is where the largest bowl you pocess and an extra pair of hands will come in handy. Either way you will have to work very fast and have everything you need to hand. I usually rope in Himself or Kiwi Daughter to help with this stage.

Take two 1 liter containers of icecream, (in our case we also have Stroopwafel Icecream in the Netherlands, but vanilla would be just as good) (Ideally the first person gets the ice-cream out of the tubs whilst the second person mixes like crazy) get all of the ice-cream out and into your large bowl. Add ¾ of the remaining Stroopwafel crumbs and (the person wearing the rubber gloves) mix into the ice-cream as quickly as you can.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The mixture will become mushy very quickly so work at speed, you don’t  want all of the ice-cream to melt, in fact it’s even nice to leave whole sections of the ice-cream as-is so that you get variation in your cut slices at the end. Get your now rapidly becoming soft mixture into the pie dish as quickly as possible. (if the base was in the fridge your helper can get it out at the last minute for you). Push the mix onto the crust and smooth over the top…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then quickly add the remaining crumbs over the top of the taart and cover with plastic cling film (your helper is useful here too) and get it all into the freezer as quickly as possible. The entire time for mixing and getting everything back into the freezer should be only a few minutes.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Cover with foil as well if you would like to freeze this for a month or more… and freeze for at least 24 hours before cutting.  To cut, you will find that cutting the entire taart in half will release the rest from the sides more easily, in fact this is usually so successful that I can lift half of it our in one piece, which when transferred to a cutting board, can be then easier cut into small pieces with a large knife. Do work fast when cutting the pieces, and keep them small, a piece of this is very  filling. Be warned the pieces will be really solid and you will have to work hard to cut it, for this reason I now cut it into pieces in the kitchen well before needed, then return it to the freezer so that it’s already in pieces when you bring it out to serve.  I’ve managed to get as many as 18-20 slices out of each taart, especially when serving in partnership with other desserts or after a large buffet meal.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 11, 2015

The Traffic Of Life Zooms By As You Appear To Stand Still…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During this long recovery from my accident, I find that constant pain and large doses of heavy pain medication leave me with low concentration,  perpetual tiredness, a tendency to sleep a lot and in general not get very much done in a day.

One task that I have set myself is to go through the some fifty thousand photographs (Yes, you read that right, fifty thousand!… and in reality that’s probably a conservative figure) that have accumulated over the last seven years and which lay dormant on my hard drive (and clogging up space on several backup external hard drives).

Progress is slow, but I’m sorting and posting items that I want to keep a record of. One such item is from a funeral of one of Himself’s oldest friends.

They had known each other since their teenage years and even though his friend traveled a lot in his work for Médecins Sans Frontières, (Doctors Without Borders) and lived an hour away a little north of Amsterdam, they always kept close contact. We enjoyed many a meal together and he was always a delight to be around. He was however sadly human, on one stint working in Africa he, a single man, fell head over heels for a local girl and in a moment of poor judgement slept with her without protection.

This lapse turned out to be more than a trivial mistake because he contracted AIDS from this encounter. Since this happened  years ago,  before the massive leap in medical knowledge and medication that is available today, the decline and deterioration in his health was inevitable with only one very sad prognosis.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

He eventually could no longer work and Himself would take the train to see him as often as he could. Then, all of a sudden we got a phone call in the middle of the night.

The message from his carer was that he had had a massive heart attack and was hanging on by a thread, there were also early signs of multiple organ failure, and when he was conscious he was calling Himself’s name and asking for him to come.

The prognosis was that he had from minutes to hours… Needless to say Himself said he was on his way, scrambled hastily into clothes and tore out the front door.  Later I learned that Himself arrived at the hospital, told his friend over that he was there, his friend gained consciousness for a few minutes and they talked, saying their goodbyes, and then he passed away.

It was like he had just managed to hang on long enough for Himself to arrive. We both attended the funeral . The morning had been somber and we had no appetite for breakfast,  the service was  emotional and Himself struggled to hold himself together.

Afterwards we had a drink and some cake per Dutch tradition with what few relatives he had, and once we were in the car it was like a weight had been lifted because we were so relieved we had got through the day. All of a sudden we also realised that we hadn’t really eaten anything and were both starving.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

As we drove along we came across a familiar sight: a roadside restaurant that stretches over the motorway. A sign said that there was a “La Place” restaurant there, which looked good. “La Place” is the restaurant brand that belongs to the department store Vroom & Dreesman (known by locals in the Netherlands as “V&D”) and they use a lot of fresh fruit and veggies which I like.

We go inside and find that there is an amazing wok menu on, customers choose their own veggies from the selection, choose chicken, beef, vegetarian or shrimp and then what they have selected gets stir fried  in front of them. Himself chose an entrée and a main, I chose a main and dessert.

The view as we sat directly over the motorway turned out to be just what we needed. The traffic rushing by epitomized what we felt, that our world had stopped in time and space whilst everyone and everything else around us was going about their normal business oblivious to our pain.

Of course funerals knock the stuffing out of you, especially when it’s for someone who died too young, and for Himself there was the added shock of loosing someone who he had known for the greater part of his life. Naturally the passage of time healed these wounds and we once again became like the traffic, moving on with life as the circle of life repeats itself with the young and old all around us.

I’m not even entirely certain if “La Place” still trades in this location, I’m usually thinking about that day when I see it and have forgotten what signs might be there now. R.I.P. “P”… Every time we pass by this motorway restaurant, I remember this day and think of you…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)


	

November 7, 2015

A Simply Eggcellent Discovery…

Filed under: Dutch Cuisine,Kranenburg,Nijmegen,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Just over the border from Kranenburg in Germany, and a few kilometers away from the Dutch city of Nijmegen, during the summer Himself and I drop in and visit a place that I heard about but hadn’t yet seen.

Back in January, after my operation, the kids visited with our friends and announced that they had seen a roadside vending machine that gives out fresh eggs, and  that they had bought some to cook back in the hotel kitchenette for breakfast!

For all the raves this place got you might have thought it was Disneyland, but they were genuinely enthusiastic and loved the ingenious way that this place operated. Over the next months Himself and I went back to Nijmegen many times for followup appointments, but it wasn’t until the last visit this summer that Himself managed to bring me here and show me what all the fuss was about.

The closest we had been previously had been a single fleeting glimpse with the kids yelling “See? Mama did you see it? “… um no I hadn’t seen it, mostly because I was literally looking for a dispenser of some sort on the edge of the road, and not a small shed.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My summer visit revealed a small shed of the type located at the bottom of many a garden, which in turn housed the dispensing machine I had heard rave reviews about.

Naturally this wasn’t the kind of machine that drops the goods from a height into a catcher at the bottom, but one where a sort of turntable reveals small doors that open upon insertion of money and the typing in of the door code.

The long wall of the shed is almost entirely taken up with small shelves where probably several hundred egg cups are displayed, there is even a small basket of fresh eggs with a sign: “Ei kapot ruilen” (Egg broken, trade/replace) so that should you find a broken egg in the box you have just purchased you can replace it with a good one from here. There is also a box to the right of the dispenser for “lege doosjes” (empty boxes) so that egg containers can be recycled again and again.

All in all it’s a brilliant way for tourists and locals to get farm fresh eggs daily without having to pull the farmer away from his business. As testament to the popularity of this place, a car was pulling away as we arrived and new one arrived as I took the photographs, the man used the machine to get two boxes of eggs and didn’t mind that I took a photograph of him doing so.

My children know me well, they were right to get excited about finding something they knew I would really love and appreciate: organic and fresh produce direct to the public and delivered in a quirky and interesting way… Eggcellent!!!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 4, 2015

The Kids Begged To Stop At DeliFrance, We Didn’t Take Much Persuading…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Family Kiwidutch were in Maastricht several years ago and whilst having a look around the central city, decided that it was time to stop or a spot of lunch.

More accurately the kids decided because we walked past a pastry shop / café called “DeliFrance” that had it’s front window open to the street.

Prominently displayed were waffles, and nothing gets a hungry child’s attention faster then delicious icing-sugar coated junk food like waffles, so having zoomed in faster than a pair of cruise missiles, they stood there pleading that they were so dying of hunger that they couldn’t walk another step, and “oh … look! … the only thing on offer we like, seems to be waffles !

Yes…(“what a shame!”). Himself and I relented, him because he was not eyeing up the waffles, but hankering after the coffee bean and me because all three of them had been patient while I took photographs and I was now rather in need for a sit down rest. Maastricht is a university city and we were in luck, the place was full whilst we ordered but there was a sudden mass exodus as a large group of students vacated in order to get to their lectures on time.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Whilst we were deciding what to order, we noticed that many of the young people sitting at the tables were packing textbooks into backpacks and getting ready to leave.

One of them was a young man who was talking to his friend about where he was supposed to be, the friend corrected him because apparently he had to be somewhere else.

The first guy let out a very loud expletive and exclaimed “But that’s in the (name I don’t remember) building and I should have been there five minutes ago!!!”).

Then he turned and sprinted out of the café, turned left so we saw him run past the open window, with his friend following, picking up things his mate had dropped.

All of the other students burst out laughing, they were obviously still on time for their lectures, but knew that this either had been or would be them one day.

With the tables suddenly vacated we were spoilt for choice and made ourselves comfortable. The children of course ordered waffles, Himself a coffee and me a cola light, my one true vice. Had I known that Little Mr. was destined to eat something with icing-sugar, I never would have pulled out a dark coloured tee-shirt for him to wear that morning… parents with children will know exactly what that means. The kids gave their waffles a ten out of ten. I also got photographs of the stone faces on the building. Refreshed and rested we set out again to look around…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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