Local Heart, Global Soul

March 16, 2019

The Shower You’d Never Want To Get Naked For…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Of course any posts about our 2016 visit to LEGO World would not be complete with at least one detailed look at one of the pieces.

I am not sure which building this is, but the LEGO builders have not just done an amazing job, they have also put lights inside the model so that the windows are lit, enhancing the features even more.

Then I went on to the Shower, yes, a shower, but it’s not water droplets falling on your head, it’s zillions of tiny pieces of LEGO.

Shower-ees don plastic hooded capes and then walk through the LEGO rain, some of them try and wave to those taking their photograph, others keep their heads down as they get pelted with the plastic pieces.

Smart parents like me sit a safe distance away and use the zoom to try and get pictures of their kids.

Little Mr. held onto the hood of his cape and kept his head down so these were fleeting photographs of a literal moment in time, since the attendants were making sure that the queue kept moving.

Apparently the experience was fun but the LEGO rainstorm hit with more ferocity than expected, those little pellets stung a little on exposed skin.

The verdict was that he happily would do it again but would make sure he kept his head down the whole way, even the idea of looking up into the shower would be a definite no-no.

Once out of the shower the carpet where visitors removed their capes was littered with LEGP pieces that attendants were shovelling back up to be used again in the shower apparatus.

Inspection of the pieces showed that they got warn out and battered from their constant recycling through the shower machinery.

For the LEGO lovers here though, that didn’t matter becuase even if all of these pieces were rather tired looking they were still genuine LEGO parts and the experience was a lot of fun.

We made our way to the car park after that and whilst there I spotted some pigeons taking shelter from the cold on the underside of the bridge.

The bridge itself was also architecturally pleasing, I really liked the design.

Some buskers were parked near the car park and event entrance, our route didn’t take us past them but we had a little music to listen to as we made our way to the car.

Finally, on the way home, we spotted (well they were rather hard to miss) rows and rows and rows of glasshouses, some lit with their glowing yellow fake sunshine and heat to make the vegetables inside grow.

It did at least brighten a grey day, which for us (well especially Little Mr.) were glowing with the tired joy of a day enjoyed and much fun had.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

May 1, 2017

Finding Another Brilliant Addition For My “To-Do” List…

Filed under: Exhibitions,Kid Friendly Activities,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Passing by the multitude of concrete garden art sculptures at the Garderen Sand Sculpture festival entrance in 2016, I find myself  looking at a large hut housing a very special exhibition.

The space is used by the “Oude Ambachten & Speelgoed Museum” (Old Crafts & Toy Museum).

I learn from their website (Dutch language only) that it is located in Terschuur, between  Amersvoort and Barneveld, and that they ” have exhibitions of over one hundred and sixty crafts,  several fully equipped workshops, shops and demonstrations of many old professions.

The craft museum is not set behind glass, in fact things are purposefully open for being touched and parents can show children how things used to work.

Because the museum believes these things should be both educational and interesting, they offer free admission to children. In addition there are regular guest  and demonstrations.”

This is exactly the kind of place that would interest me, crafts, history, …perfect!

I can only hope that this little exhibition gives visitors here enough of taste that they follow up with a visit.  Sadly we don’t have time this trip for this particular detour since we already have plans but I will definitely be keeping it on my “to-do” list for when I do in the future. For now I need to keep moving… I have a reservation to keep.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The text in the following sign asks if you are “Curious about our museum?”  and then underneath “Visit us in Terschuur.”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Oude Ambachten & Speelgoed Museum / Old Crafts & Toy Museum
Rijksweg 87
3784 LV Terschuur
Tel. 0342 – 46 20 60
Fax 0342 – 46 20 27

April 19, 2017

I Am In For An Unexpected Surprise…

The exhibits continue one after another at Fort Kijkduin. I am taking up the rear of our group, enjoying it all at a leisurely pace. (“Fast” is a setting I no longer have after my accident anyway). There is however something very very different just around the corner… Looks like I am in for an unexpcted surprise…

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

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(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

(photograph © Kiwidutch )

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands

April 17, 2017

Tiny Works Of Art In Their Own Right…

The history continues in the next rooms of Fort Kijkduin near Den Helder.  This time the focus is on militeria: medals, awards and coins. These are just a few examples of the many here. I am also saving these as reference material for my drawing files.  I find that many of the patterns in these pieces are tiny works of art in their own right.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands
 

April 16, 2017

Buttoning Down On My Button Knowledge…

One of the things that I see in the Fort Kijkduin exhibitions is how buttons are made from bone. I had a rough idea before but have never seen any actual illustrations of it until now. It’s obviously a more percision task than I ever imagined… Cool!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands

April 15, 2017

Fort Kijkduin: War And Peace…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The museum and exhibits at Fort Kijkduin near Den Helder show us many of the aspects that the fort has to offer.

One information board about World War II told us:

When the general mobilisation was announced in 1939, the fortifications here in Den Helder were reinforced up to war (strength) standards.

Extra soldiers were housed in Fort Kijkduin. However, after the surrender of May 1940 the Germans took control.

The German navy used the fort for artillery training also because they wanted to used the fort as a bomb shelter. T

he topside of the reduit (Kiwi’s Note: FR for a fortified structure) was given a thick capping of reinforced concrete of about 60 cm thick.

Under this cap was an additional meter thick layer of sand.

The Germans used the fire control post as lookout post.” It’s natural that one army (or navy) or another has used this fortification to their advantage over the past centuries. It’s easier however to think of these places being places of the “distant past” rather than of the “recent past”. One can only hope that it is never ever needed again in warfare. The exhibits continue: this is an amazing place, so much to see and thought provoking too.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands

April 14, 2017

Fort Kijkduin, The Tour Continues…

My tour of Fort Kijkduin continues, there is plenty to see…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch

Den Helder: Fort Kijkduin / The Netherlands

December 18, 2016

“Rarely Seen”, So Many To Choose…

In this, the last installment of Museon’s National Geographic exhibition “Rarely Seen”, I have collated a few of the images I found to be most memorable.  Of course I could fit more of the origional photographs in if I had resisted the urge to take additional close-up images of the photographs, but you know mw I could not resist. the level of detail in some of the images just begged for a deeper look,  in fact, in some of the images you could look over and over again and ever time find something new to amaze you. That’s what tells you that these are National Geographic worthy, and why my “point and shoot” efforts never will be. Still, it doesn’t mean that I can not appreciate these photographs,  in fact I think it makes me appreciate them even more. One thing is for certain, my second-hand reproduction of these is a poor relation when compared to standing looking at the real thing. If this exhibition ever comes somewhere near to where you live, I would througherly recommend a visit.  They were on display here between 21 April and 28 August 2016 and may have run their course here in The Hague, but these will always be inspirational. One final time, the same note as before: the artists name is in bold type, the text came with the exhibition.
ICE CAVE.
Ian Plant, Wisconsin.
A ceiling of icicles frames the intrepid photographer on the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin. Known as the Jewels of Lake Superior, during the winter, needles of ice hang from the sea cave ceilings. The widespread caves along the lakeshore form as freezing and thawing conditions and wave action shape the sandstone of the Devils Island Formation.

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

(photograph © Ian Plant)

ICE FORMATIONS.
Chip Phillips, Canadian Rockies.
Winter’s dance with the cold can be seen in cracks stretching towards the horizon on a lake in Canada’s Rocky Mountains. Repeated freezing and thawing create striking geometric patterns on the surface ice.

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

(photograph © Chip Phillips)

PURPLE HAZE.
Guy Tal, Utah.
A rare carpet of purple flowers spreads towards a distant butte. Every few years, when winter snow and spring warmth create the ideal conditions, this stretch of the Mojave Desert bursts into colour with bee plant and scorpion weed. The view is best enjoyed from a distance — bee plant has an unpleasant odour and scorpion weed is named for its bite, which can cause a reaction similar to poison ivy.

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

(photograph © Guy Tal)

THE NORTHERN LIGHTS.
Marc Adamus, Canada.
The green glow of an aurora reflects off a frozen lakeshore in Canada’s Yukon Territory. In this composite image, the aurora shows off one of its most common colours. Electrically charged particles from the sun enter our atmosphere and interact with gases above the magnetic poles to form these rippling curtains of lights.

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

(photograph © Marc Adamus)

FROZEN ICE.
Glenn Nagel, Michigan.
A full moon stands guard over the St. Joseph North Pier Lighthouse in Saint Joseph, Michigan. Crashing waves against the pier during the cold winter of 2013 built up layers of ice and created a frozen dreamscape on the shore of Lake Michigan.

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

(photograph © Glenn Nagel)

ROOM WITH A VIEW.
Manuel Paz-Castanal, Spain.
From across the street, a photographer captures visitors at the opening of a photography exhibit in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, enjoying some fresh air along with the art works. The city, a pilgrimage site in northwest Spain, is known for its beautiful old centre.

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

(photograph © Manuel Paz-Castanal)

SPLASH.
Aytul Akbas, Turkey.
A brewing storm sends waves splashing over a retaining wall in Kocaeli Province, Turkey. As the winds picked up, a passer-by’s rainbow umbrella turned inside out.

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

(photograph © Aytul Akbas)

NEBRA SKY DISK.
Kenneth Garrett
The setting sun reflects off this sky disk in central Germany. Buried on the Mittelberg hill near the town of Nebra in 1600 B.C., the disk tracks the sun’s movement along the horizon. It’s the oldest known depiction of the cosmos and may have served as an agricultural and spiritual calendar.

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

(photograph © Kenneth Garrett)

RAYONG DAM.
Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal, Thailand.
Fishermen look like just a drop in the water standing inside the overflow spillway of the Khlong Yai Reservoir in Rayong, southern Thailand. This dam provides the region with inexpensive electrical power.

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

(photograph © Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal)

December 17, 2016

Their Name Might “Rarely Seen”, But They Shouldn’t Be…

I’ve been “condensing” some of the photographs from Museon’s “Rarely Seen” exhibition that took place in The Hague earlier this year. Running from  21 April 2016  to 28 August 2016, Himself and I agreed that some of these images left a lasting impression, and that there you have to be a seriously talented photographer to have your work chosen by the National Geographic. In my penaltimate post my method remains the same as the previous two posts: the photographer name is shown in bold type and the texts shown are those that were given by the exhibition. Enjoy!

Part Three of our visit this year to Museon’s National Geographic exhibition entitled “Rarely Seen”.
Per the other two posts, the name of the photographer has been highlighted in bold and photo credit given.

EGRET EATING.
Erlend Haarberg
A great white egret’s bill mimics a sharp pair of chopsticks as it snags a fish from the water.

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(photograph © Erlend Haarberg)

(Kiwi’s note: from the look on it’s face, I think this fish knows exactly what kind of trouble he is in…)

GREEN PIANO.
Tomas Munita, Japan.
Tender leaves cover a piano in Odaka, Japan. The piano is just a small piece of the radioactive debris left from the March 2011 tsunami and subsequent meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. While the government has vowed that evacuees will be able to return one day, the disaster clean-up has been frustrating and slow.

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

(photograph © Tomas Munita)

HEADS UP.
Fabi Fliervoet
A Boeing 747 comes in for a landing on the small Caribbean island of St. Martin. Planes fly directly over Maho Beach and give visitors and plane-spotters a thrill as the jets fly almost too close for comfort above this sun-kissed tourist destination.

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

(photograph © Fabi Fliervoet)

LEMUR LEAP.
Stephen Alvarez, Madagascar.
Lemurs perch like ghosts in a limestone forest in western Madagascar’s Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park and Reserve. The stone, laid down in the Jurassic period, has been weathered into spires and slot canyons, creating isolated microhabitats for this endangered lemur species, known as Von der Decken’s sifaka.

(photograph © Stephen Alvarez)

(photograph © Stephen Alvarez)

PRESIDENT OBAMA SITS FOR HIS 3-D PORTRAIT.
Pete Souza, Washington, D.C.
Inspired by a life mask of Lincoln, the Smithsonian Institution asked President Obama to be the first American president to pose for a 3-D portrait. The data were used to create a 3-D bust.

(photograph © Pete Souza)

(photograph © Pete Souza)

PUDDLE JUMPER.
Dave Kan, Australia.
A wild kangaroo bounds across the surface of a Queensland lake at sunset. The hopper and the trees on the shore are the only break between the vivid sky and the reflective waters.

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

(photograph © Dave Kan)

RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY.
Andrew Suryono, Indonesia.
An orangutan creates an umbrella out of a banana leaf to hide from the rain in Bali, Indonesia. Wild populations of the endangered primate are under threat from habitat destruction, as their natural ranges are being destroyed for agriculture and timber harvests.

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

(photograph © Andrew Suryono)

ROYAL WHITE TIGER.
Tim Flach, Studio Shot.
An intimate portrait captures a white tiger’s quiet fierceness. Tigers are often bred in captivity for various colour variations, which rarely occur in the wild.

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

(photograph © Tim Flach)

SHAOLIN MONKS.
Steve McCurry
Buddhist monks in training hang upside down in Shaolin Monastery in Zhengzhou, China. The monks practice their faith through martial arts in a form known as Shaolin Kung Fu. Used for defence, the practice is marked by self-restraint and refined movement.

(photograph © Steve McCurry)

(photograph © Steve McCurry)

STANDING STONES.
Helen Hotson, England.
The Men-an-Tol stones near Penzance in Cornwall, England, contain echoes of earlier times. The megalithic rocks, possibly part of an ancient circle, have no clear explanation. Local legend holds that a person who passes through the rare holed stone can be cured of many ailments including rickets and back problems.

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

(photograph © Helen Hotson)

UNDERWATER SCULPTURE GARDEN.
Jason deCaires Taylor,  Mexico.
A bed of sea grass shelters the sculptures of “The Anchors” at the Museum of Underwater Art. The pieces depict the heads of anchors from NBCs TV show Today. Located in the National Marine Park of Cancun, Isla Mujeres, and Punta Nizuc in Mexico, this sculpture garden serves as an artificial reef. Artist Jason deCaires Taylor conceived of the dive site as an attraction to help relieve pressure on nearby coral reefs.

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

(photograph © Jason deCaires Taylor)

SAILING STONES.
Eric Harrison
Sailing stones leave trails in the cracked mud of Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park. Moved by small pools of water formed by ice melted in the morning sun, these “sailing” stones have confounded viewers for years.

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

(photograph © Eric Harrison)

WATER WORLD
Rakesh Rocky
An ant pushes a spherical droplet of water down a paved path, and in the process the droplet creates a mirrored reflection of the ant’s world. With more than 10,000 known ant species, these social insects play an important ecological role by aerating soils and dispersing seeds.

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

(photograph © Rakesh Rocky)

Looking forward to the last set tomorrow!

December 16, 2016

National Geographic Photographers Delight Us…

Following on from yesterdays post, Himself and I visited the National Geographic “Rarely Seen” exhibition earlier this year. Running from (21 April 2016 – 28 August 2016) here in The Hague, these photographs are beyond breathtaking. I’m hoping that they delight you as much as they did us. (Sorry for the lopsided angle on a few of them, I loaned a wheelchair so that I wouldn’t have to stand for too long). As per yesterday’s post, each photographers name is given in bold type and appropriate credit given. The texts with each photograph are original to the exhibition.

NET MENDING.
Ly Hoang Long, Vietnam.
Five female workers labour in unison as they mend fishnets at a workshop in the southern Vietnamese province of Bac Lieu. The miles of fishing nets are important for the thriving fish export market that anchors the local economy.

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

(photograph © Ly Hoang Long)

PONTOON BRIDGES.
Wolfgang Weinhardt, India.
Pilgrims and devotees use temporary pontoon bridges to cross the Ganges River in Allahabad, India, to attend the Maha Kumbh Mela — the world’s largest spiritual gathering. Several million Hindus make their way here every year, and their numbers are increasing. Eighteen bridges handled some 70 million people here in 2013.

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

(photograph © Wolfgang Weinhardt)

DANGLE IF YOU DARE.
Ivan Kuznetsov, China.
Ivan Kuznetsov, a Russian daredevil, takes a picture of a view that few will ever witness in person — his feet dangling above the Hong Kong skyline. According to Kuznetsov himself, his thrill-seeking escapades are based on courage, ingenuity and intuition. And the city, with skyscrapers topping 80 floors, presents the perfect backdrop.

(photograph © Ivan Kuznetsov)

(photograph © Ivan Kuznetsov)

(photograph © Ivan Kuznetsov)

(photograph © Ivan Kuznetsov)

MOM`S TAXI SERVICE.
Mark MacEwen
Peeking out between massive teeth, a newly hatched broad-snouted caiman goes for a ride in its mother’s mouth. Mom will care for her babies — teaching them to swim and hunt — until they can make it on their own. But even with all that maternal care, only about one in ten will reach adulthood.

(photograph © Mark MacEwen)

(photograph © Mark MacEwen)

TA PROHM.
Robert Clark, Cambodia.
Sun shines on a monk standing in a doorway of the root-covered temple complex, Ta Prohm, Cambodia. Once abandoned, the temple, neighbour to the more famous Angkor Wat, was quickly reclaimed by the surrounding forest. Since no mortar was used when the temple was built in 1186, the roots of strangler figs and cotton trees had plenty of room to grow.

(photograph © Robert Clark)

(photograph © Robert Clark)

(photograph © Robert Clark)

(photograph © Robert Clark)

(photograph © Robert Clark)

(photograph © Robert Clark)

ANIMAL CONFRONTATION.
Bence Mate, Costa Rica.
A green-crowned brilliant hummingbird and a green pit viper look eye to eye. The snake hangs delicately from a branch as the humming bird hovers mid-air in attack. The showdown captures an eternal dance between predator and prey.

(photograph © Bence Mate)

(photograph © Bence Mate)

(photograph © Bence Mate)

(photograph © Bence Mate)

(photograph © Bence Mate)

(photograph © Bence Mate)

HIGH DIVE
Haris Begić
Lorens Listo takes flight with a jump off the Old Bridge (or Stari Most) in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Diving competitions have been held here since the bridge was built in A.D. 447. Divers plummet some 79 feet (24 m) into the Neretva River below.

 (photograph © Haris Begić )

(photograph © Haris Begić )

 (photograph © Haris Begić )

(photograph © Haris Begić )

 (photograph © Haris Begić )

(photograph © Haris Begić )

 (photograph © Haris Begić )

(photograph © Haris Begić )

WALK WITH THE FLOWERS.
Dave Yoder, Abu Dhabi.
Inlaid flowers create a colourful tapestry as a woman walks across the 183,000-square-foot (17,000 sq m) central courtyard of the Sheikh Zayed Mosque. The marble used in the construction came from all over the world. The mosque can hold 40,000 worshippers for prayer.

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

(Kiwi’s note: all of the photographs in the exhibitions were displayed in sort of light boxes, getting photographs was tricky because there was a sort of ” shadow” that flickered behind the image. The black bands in the following photograph is one such of these and not part of the original).

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

(photograph © Dave Yoder)

UNDERWATER PARK.
Marc Henauer, Austria.
As if in a dream, a scuba diver swims above a grass-lined path in Green Lake (Grüner See). In the spring, snowmelt floods the lake in Tragoss, Austria, and the water level rises about 33 feet (10 m), The path, meadows, and hiking trails around the lake turn aquatic, but the submersion lasts only a few weeks.

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

(photograph © Marc Henauer)

RIVER HOUSE.
Irene Becker
The lazy currents of the Drina River in Serbia surround this one-room “rock” house, which has been sitting here for more than 45 years. Materials to build this fortress in the middle of the river were carried by kayak or floated downstream. While storm and floods have led to damage, the house has always been restored.

(photograph © Irene Becker)

(photograph © Irene Becker)

MOERAKI BOULDERS.
Vicki Mar, New Zealand.
Early morning light bathes a Moeraki Boulder on a wave-splashed Otago beach on New Zealand’s South Island. The spherical boulders formed during thousands of years as calcite precipitated in mudstone, and were then revealed as waves eroded the mudstone. Naturally occurring cracks add character to the geological wonders.

(photograph © Vicki Mar)

(photograph © Vicki Mar)

(photograph © Vicki Mar)

(photograph © Vicki Mar)

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS.
Nanut Bovorn, Thailand.
The night sky fills with light as lanterns soar and reflect a mirror image in the surrounding water. At the Loy Krathong festival, which usually takes place at the end of the rainy season in Thailand, festivalgoers release lanterns to protect against bad luck.

(photograph © Nanut Bovorn)

(photograph © Nanut Bovorn)

I think I have so many more photographs from this exhibition, I would easily fill another six or more posts… I have however tried to pick out a few of my favourites so look forward to a few more tomorrow.

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