Local Heart, Global Soul

December 22, 2015

The Drugs Keep Me Going, But Now It’s Really Time To Go…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve finished my visit of the 2015 Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition, Himself and the kids are due to pick me up, so here is a last look around.

One thing that I notice immediately is that the queue of people waiting to go inside is now massive, stretching  some distance away from the Sand sculpture exhibition entrance area until way out into the garden ornament display bit.

It certainly pays to have been one of the first people in when the doors opened this afternoon. (that’s good advice for any place open to the pubic that is likely to be popular).

As with last year, there is even a small play area for kids so that parents can browse in peace, Nope I didn’t use the trampoline. Do you think I’m mad? (crazy), not a chance. It’s been a half-day opening time today, so for me, short but busy and now I was severely ready for a long rest to recover from all the standing I have been doing.

I have also been popping pain relief  pills rather heavily, something I do on the rare occasions I get some time to do something special these days, but not something I like to do too often. I’m certainly in need of a few more by now, so days out like this don’t occur too often either. I also know that I will be paying for today’s antics for the next few days at the very least, but it has been worth it. Last but not least,  few very realistic garden ornaments… It was hard but I resisted the “come buy me” whispers that that squirrel was making…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 21, 2015

Preaching The Moral High Ground, But Editing Out Much Of The Truth…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned earlier in my posts about Garderen and the exhibition here, that one of the children’s books was called “Ot en Sien”, and I also promised to elaborate on this more at a later time.

This time has now arrived.

There are some images that are reoccurring if you spend any amount of time in the Netherlands, and one of those are the illustrations from the children’s book “Ot en Sien” by Hindericus Scheepstra.

These illustrations in the book, by Cornelis Jetses, can be found on all manner of tourist paraphernalia, biscuit (cookie) tins, as they are of the old fashioned, idealised and endearing, but this series book are more than just a nostalgic look at life in the early 1900’s but in fact have deep roots and have been a profound influence on the Dutch education system. I’ve edited some information from Wikipedia (link below) which tells us: “Ot en Sien” are a series of children’s book written by a teacher in the Dutch province of Drenthe in the Netherlands.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ot (“en” translates as “and”) Sien are the main charactors of the books which were very popular in the first half of the twenthieth century, with the first series “Dicht bij Huis (“Close to home”) appearing in 1902 and the second series Nog bij Moeder (“Still with mother”), following in 1904.

Hindericus Scheepstra was influenced and inspired by Jan Ligthart, who had the intention to expose young people to what he considered a healthy daily family life.

Ot (short for Otto) and Sien (short for e.g. Francine) are next door neighbors, a boy and a girl.

Their illustrations were based on two children that lived in Jetses’ neighborhood. Drenthe at the time was the most impoverished province of the Netherlands where quite a few people were still living in dwellings constructed of peat and sods.

The abject poverty is nowhere to be seen in the stories that depict a very idealized and sanitised version of reality. After WWII the stories of Ot and Sien gradually went out of fashion and were often ridiculed for the unrealistic picture they gave of life in the province.

A century after their appearance there was a revival in the interest for the publications and in 2004 an exposition was held, focusing mostly on the artwork by Jetses.
Ligthart intended to give a description of daily family interactions, and set moral standards of behaviour with idealized examples on how to treat family, servants and guests.

Ligthart’s philosophy was followed by many teachers in elementary schools in the Netherlands and the “Ot en Sien” books became a ubiquitous teaching tool for reading in elementary schools. This phenomenon lasted until deep in the 1950s and is one of the most remarkable developments in education in the country.

Generations of children in the ever more urbanizing and sub-urbanizing society grew up with an idyllic and rather unrealistic view of what family life should be like and apparently was like in the country side of Drenthe. Few city children ever experienced that, and their parents certainly did not have a servant in the house.

Knowing this, one is also aware that small town life is usually less expensive Still in the eighties, Ot en Sien were very present in the lives of the children that grew-up in Drenthe, their stories are a classic and loved both by young and old.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

They have left a strong impression on those who had the luck of having a simple and perhaps a somewhat naíve childhood, growing-up in this province.
In the Hague a statue of Ot and Sien was erected in 1930.

The text was to read “In memory of Jan Ligthart” but his widow Marie Lion Cachet objected to this because she knew that her husband had not actually written the stories, although he had given his friend Scheepstra continuous advice.

Scheepstra had the advantage that he was a Drenthe native and so could add a measure of local color to the stories. The inscription therefore was amended to “In memory of Jan Ligthart and H. Scheepstra“. Later the town of Roden in Drenthe also dedicated a monument to Ot and Sien and their creators.
It was the start of a new method of writing children’s books and had profound influence on Dutch primary (elementary) school education in the first half of the twentieth century”
I will go into the detail of why this was a new method in a future blog post (First I have to dig out some antique gems that I was lucky enough to find and bargain hard for at a flee market just after I arrived in the Netherlands, take photographs and do a little more research). This post therefore focuses on the illustrations by Jetses, because the images are beautiful… even though they might not be exactly telling the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 20, 2015

Getting To The Final Grain Of Sand…

This post from the Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition contains a few Sand Sculpture books on the children’s book theme that Himself and I could not identify. The ones I did get however are: “Swiebertje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“Jip en Janneke…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Sjaki en de Chocoladefabriek…” (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Molletje…”

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Dik Trom…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“De Negerhut van Ome Tom…” (Uncle Tom’s Cabin)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This one is the first of my “mystery” books..

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and here is my second mystery offering…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

And now another one that everyone knows… “Smurfs…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then I got a postcard that sums up the exhibition this year…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 19, 2015

Maybe I Am Just Reading Far More Into It Than I Needed To….

Whilst visiting the 2015 Sand Sculpture Exhibition in Garderen this year I was perplexed about the letters marked out in the indoor section that went under the themes of this year: Children’s Books. Because there was a competition to name all of the sculptures here I first assumed that these were clues to break the puzzel. Now however I am more thinking that maybe I was looking too deeply, and that these are just random letters that together also fit together into the “reading” theme… Today’s books that have been the central reading stock of many a Dutch child are:  “Beertje Paddington… (Paddington Bear)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“De Grote Vriendelijke Reus…(The Big Friendly Giant)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Flipje van de Betuwe…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“Jan Jans en de Kinderen… (Jan Jans and The Children)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Kikker en Pad…”

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Mickey Mouse…”

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“Nijntje… (a.k.a. “Miffy” outside of the Netherlands)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Pinkeltje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“Woezel en Pip…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 18, 2015

Everything Seen Through The Eyes Of A Child…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “Children’s Book” theme of the 2015 Gardren Sand Sculpture exhibition continues… Today’s books are: “Alice in Wonderland”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Dolfje Werewolfje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Erik of het Kleine Insectenboek…  (Erik of the Small Insect book)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“Peter Konijn van Beatrix Potter… (Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 17, 2015

More Pages Of Children’s Books Turned…

Following yesterday’s post we are looking at Sand Sculptures in the 2015 Exhibition, all of which in this section follow the theme “Children’s Books…” Starting with: “In de soete suikerbol”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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“SinterKlaas”

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“Arendsoog”

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“Pietje Bell …”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 16, 2015

We Open The First Pages Of The Books…

The next part of the exhibition is inside and follows the theme of “Children’s Books”… (The ones pertainent to Dutch culture of course). I need to do more future investigation into these books since many of them are not familiar to me, since my childhood was spent in New Zealand. Himself helped me to identify the correct titles… I can in the meantime, marvel at the artworks that display these so well. The first ones are: Winnie the Pooh, Snuf de Hond, Scheepsjongens van de Bonte Koe and Nils Holgerson.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

There was a competition to guess all of the titles…I’m not sure what the letters are for, but in some way they are important, and clues to the puzzle.

Snuf de Hond…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Scheepsjongens van de Bonte Koe…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Nils Holgerson…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 15, 2015

Old Fashioned Play IS Still Here Today…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the 2015 Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition the next item was the topic of children and outside play.

There is plenty of debate at present about the rampant rise of electronic gadgets and in particularly the amount of electronic games that children at playing at a very young age.

I know that all of these gadgets are very addictive (both for adults as well as children) and fun, and that completely restricting kids to almost nothing will not help them when they will (eventually) need more and more computer knowledge in order to keep up in the workplace, but you also want them to have an old fashioned “childhood” as well.

Luckily we have always taken our kids outside, to the park when they were smaller, and they still love being outside and doing sports now. Little Mr loves nothing more than an after school football kick-a-round with Himself on the street, often neighbourhood friends join them and it burns off some energy which both of them enjoy. Both of our children are restricted to two hours electronics per day, that includes television (except in school holidays, especially in the winter). Little Mr is often reluctant about being parted from Minecraft, but kids have to learn that entertainment comes in more than just electronic forms. A lot of parents we know have a similar view (and restrictions) on their family electronics, so in our circles at least the “old fashioned childhood” is far from dead.

There is only one section of our life where we as parents have conceded defeat, and that is on long car journeys where keeping both kids absorbed in their own iPads has truly been the best solution to keeping World War 3 from breaking out in the back seat of our vehicle. Believe me, we have tried, and horrendously failed, time after time, after time, after time, after time, after hair tearing time. Eventually we decided that peace and quiet via the Ipad made for far less stressful driving and capitulated.  Roll on summer when the long warm days will bring back them playing on the street with friends until bedtime.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 14, 2015

More Than 50 Million Bikes For 19 Million People…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The 1973 oil crisis began in October 1973 when the members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arabmembers of the OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) proclaimed an oil embargo as a response to American involvement in the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

Six days after Egypt and Syria launched a surprise military campaign against Israel to regain territories lost in the June 1967 Six-Day War, the US supplied Israel with arms.

OAPEC announced the oil embargo against Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the US.
By the end of the embargo in March 1974, the price of oil had risen from $3 per barrel to nearly $12 globally, in the US prices were significantly higher.

The oil crisis, or “shock”, the embargo caused had many short-term and long-term effects on global politics and the global economy.
The crisis had a major impact on international relations and created a rift within NATO. Some European nations and Japan sought to disassociate themselves from United States foreign policy in the Middle East.
To address this, the Nixon Administration began multilateral negotiations with the combatants and arranged for Israel to pull back from the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights.
By January 18, 1974, Henry Kissinger had negotiated an Israeli troop withdrawal from parts of the Sinai Peninsula. The promise of a negotiated settlement between Israel and Syria was enough to convince Arab oil producers to lift the embargo in March 1974.
The Dutch were forced during the embargo on try and make Sunday into a “car-less day” so took to their bikes, and this they did with a vengeance, cycling , rollerskating and picnicking on the empty streets. Some say that they cycled on the empty motorways, others say this is a myth. According to Himself and other Dutch, apparently the biggest impact was however that the Dutch discovered the financial, time and physical benefits to using their bikes and so the Dutch love affair with cycling began.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: 1973 Oil Crisis

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 13, 2015

The Ordinary And Extraordinary: Literally The Sands Of Time…

From Grandmother’s Tips, (put candle wax onto zips to make them run smoothly) to transport and famous Dutch poems and stories, from children’s toys and pass-times, the story of ordinary Dutch life and special events, all sculpted in sand goes on…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

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