Local Heart, Global Soul

December 27, 2015

The Last Evening Of A Wonderful Weekend…

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

On our last evening of the 2015 Pinkstra long weekend we decided that eating out would be better than trying to find grocery shops open on a public holiday . We had deliberately only planned on cooking one evening meal this weekend, for two reasons: first because Himself and I fancied some time off from the kitchen, and secondly because I get out so rarely these days I wanted to make the very best of the opportunity.

On another note: my computer crashed and I resized these photos via Paint because  Windows Rezizer doesn’t seem to want to work… are these resized right? Feedback would be appreciated 🙂

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 26, 2015

The Greenery Is Temporarily Blank …

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m trying to sort out my internet and photographic problems, and will retrospectively post the photos as soon as I have found a solution. I apologise that in the meantime this post is sans photos, the technology situation is getting tiring for our kids too, they appear to be substituting their allocation of time on the iPad or computer with fighting with each other as much as possible. …or maybe that’s something that”s become a better sport than the iPad or computer ever were. I have a teenager and a pre-teen in the house after all and we are a very normal family with normal parents and kids. C’est la vie…

We are still in the Landal Colderhoven holiday park in the Veluwe. One thing that I love about renting a holiday house with a garden is that I get the chance to attempt to photograph some of the greenery around the garden. There are pine-cones, flowers and leaves, and since I’ve always struggled when it comes to photographing  them so a little practice is a good thing. Let’s take a look…

 

December 24, 2015

The Waiting Game Pays Off And The Results Are Priceless…

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,
squirrel 1a (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Regular readers know that I live in the city of the Hague and like many a large European Dutch city, garden spaces are hard to come by, not to mention expensive.

Places like the Veluwe are the closest  the Netherlands has to a large national park (although there are smaller areas of wilderness of course) and the chance to see wildlife that is more than just a seagull, crow or pidgeon.

Squirrels are non-existant in New Zealand so much to the amusement of my Dutch husband, I’m like a kid in a sweet shop when I see one, even to date the number of times I’ve seen a squirrel in my life I can count on one hand… and each time is as exciting as the first time.

Yes, my husband laughs, but these little animals are natures genious, shy, beautiful, funny, graceful, photogenic, they are one of my favourite animals and it’s the highlight of my holiday if I can get a photograph.

I’d packed birdseed, a fat-ball, raw peanuts and sunflower seeds and put them out as soon as we arrived so that the local wildlife community would understand that our address for these few days came with breakfast lunch and dinner to be shared with my furry and feathered friends.

For some reason, even getting up at the crack of dawn with the camera for an early morning quiet photoshoot,  the camera well hidden behind closed curtains with only the lens poking out (using half a dozen clothes pegs), the first two mornings the table remained unvisited.

Himself and the eagle eyed kids spotted glimpses of red fur, scurrying up trees at lightening speed on several occasions during the day and Himself saw several at close range whilst out on an early morning walk, so assured me that they are close by, they just were not appearing anywhere within camera range.

I therefore hauled myself out of bed at an indecent hour on the last morning with not much hope. It seemed that squirrels like sleeping in as much as I do because the first hour was without even a rustle of a leaf, but all of a sudden there he was (or she, who knows?) … first on the grass and then onto the table.

I took a few shots and went to get the kids, especially the little friend of Little Mr who I know for sure has never seen a squirrel. She had just woken up and her sleepy half closed eyes opened in sheer amazement as she peeked and watched through the curtains. Despite all attempts to keep three kids still and quiet, after a few minutes they were too loud, the spell was broken and the squirrel fled and did not return.

The smile on our little guest friends face reflected mine, and later when she saw her mother back at home it was one of the first of her new experiences that she told about. Priceless… I only managed a few photographs, but Thank You little squirrel for making our day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1f (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1g (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1h (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Additional note…

(sigh) Photo problems again… will get them to you a.s.a.p. after getting a computer friend’s advice. (done!)

December 23, 2015

The “Pizza” That Might Just Possibly Kill You…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Children never cease to amaze me. Little Mr has a neighbourhood friend along for this Pinksteren, (“Pentecost” in English) long weekend trip to the Veluwe.

Since there was a shop on the Landal Colderhoven site that stocked everything from swim goggles, snorkels, toys, gadgets, hiking gear, postcards, groceries and of course sweets (candy), Himself and I decided that the best way to avoid being constantly pestered was to give each kid Euro 20,– to spend as they wished. (Within reason, naturally).

I was extremely impressed to see that our little guest without hesitation spent time and a great deal of thought in choosing gifts for her little brother and her parents. In fact, apart from a few small coins loose change, she spent the entire amount on them, and when I asked if she maybe wanted to get a small souvenir for herself she modestly replied “No, I have a lovely holiday away, my little brother and my parents couldn’t come so I would rather spend it on them since they have missed out”.

My heart melted at her whole-hearted generosity: this is kid who comes from one income family, the father is self employed and the economic crisis has meant a big down-turn in work so they often struggle to make ends met.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Holidays are of course out of the question so even a weekend away like this is a big deal to her, she and Little Mr get on brilliantly and she is appreciating and loving every minute of her stay. Even eating in the restaurant has her wide eyed and looking apprehensive as I gently coach her through how to go through the menu, give her choice to the people serving us etc.

She is very shy, well mannered kid, a little scared in new situations but soaking up every new experience like a sponge and growing with confidence before our eyes. For us, since the holiday house sleeps six it was no trouble to bring her with us, she gets on well with both Little Mr and Kiwi Daughter and her presence means that our children find plenty to do that doesn’t include fighting themselves silly and picking fault with each other every moment of the day for the entire long weekend. Win Win !!!

There was a seat near the entrance to the shop where I sat whilst the kids browsed and considered their purchases. I’d had a word to the lady behind the till to inform her that I was taking a supervisory role whilst the kids spent their money and asked if this was ok. It was. The kids bought me things to look at and ask advice, quality, value for money, practicality etc.

They carefully put back rejected items from whence they came, the shop wasn’t busy and the lady at the till kept a smiling eye on the proceedings. All of a sudden Little Mr appeared before me with the biggest grin imaginable on his face: “I’d like to buy a Pizza please Mama, Please, please, please, please, please?”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I smelled a rat, he was pulling faces trying hard to look cute and innocent, his eyes were pleading, the hope was visible in his eyes.

There was a catch in this for sure, my Mama Alert Radar was firing on all cylinders, something was fishy here, there was absolutely not a shadow of doubt.

The “Pizza” appeared from behind his back… a small box, too small for real pizza, but decently sized all the same…cold and plastic wrapped.

The truth dawned, this was a “pizza” of the sweet variety, pure, unadulterated sugar complete with more “E” numbers than I ever want to see, or know exist, ever. Ugh. Now I have to look at these pleading eyes, he knows I really really, really, want to say “No, that’s the sugar shock from Hell, just looking at it might induce a diabetic coma, it’s pure rubbish, please go and put it back”.

Those pleading eyes… that visible hope… I notice out of the corner of my eye that Little Friend is shyly looking towards us, I read hope in her face too… I cave in and administer conditions that include more tooth brushing then he’s ever done in his life… The face of my son first registers shock and surprise that I said “Yes“, I see the comprehension dawn on him, then pure joy that he has what he has been pleading for and didn’t really expect to get.

I get a hug so hard that it hurt, and hear “:Thank you Mama, Thank you Mama, You are the Best Mama!, You are the Best Mama!, Thank you Mama!” all the way as he dashes to pay, he is jumping up and down on the spot like a jumping bean, whilst he waits for his purchase to be rung up, he is so excited he cannot contain his glee.

Needless to say the lady at the till has been watching and is now grinning widely too. When Little Mr did his bouncing bean impression at the till, it was the final straw and the lady lost it and began to laugh. I call out a joke that he’s like this even before the sugar shock has been unwrapped, please pity me after he has eaten some of this. She laughs even harder.  Little Mr is quick to share his “Pizza”, mostly with his guest and even his sister got to pick out something from it.
Ew, this thing is certainly diabetes on a plate, a sugar shock from Hell… But the pleasure of this sickly treat was clearly heavenly (and he was even careful to make it last the entire long weekend). Who doesn’t need a guilty pleasure once in a while?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 22, 2015

The Drugs Keep Me Going, But Now It’s Really Time To Go…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’ve finished my visit of the 2015 Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition, Himself and the kids are due to pick me up, so here is a last look around.

One thing that I notice immediately is that the queue of people waiting to go inside is now massive, stretching  some distance away from the Sand sculpture exhibition entrance area until way out into the garden ornament display bit.

It certainly pays to have been one of the first people in when the doors opened this afternoon. (that’s good advice for any place open to the pubic that is likely to be popular).

As with last year, there is even a small play area for kids so that parents can browse in peace, Nope I didn’t use the trampoline. Do you think I’m mad? (crazy), not a chance. It’s been a half-day opening time today, so for me, short but busy and now I was severely ready for a long rest to recover from all the standing I have been doing.

I have also been popping pain relief  pills rather heavily, something I do on the rare occasions I get some time to do something special these days, but not something I like to do too often. I’m certainly in need of a few more by now, so days out like this don’t occur too often either. I also know that I will be paying for today’s antics for the next few days at the very least, but it has been worth it. Last but not least,  few very realistic garden ornaments… It was hard but I resisted the “come buy me” whispers that that squirrel was making…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 21, 2015

Preaching The Moral High Ground, But Editing Out Much Of The Truth…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I mentioned earlier in my posts about Garderen and the exhibition here, that one of the children’s books was called “Ot en Sien”, and I also promised to elaborate on this more at a later time.

This time has now arrived.

There are some images that are reoccurring if you spend any amount of time in the Netherlands, and one of those are the illustrations from the children’s book “Ot en Sien” by Hindericus Scheepstra.

These illustrations in the book, by Cornelis Jetses, can be found on all manner of tourist paraphernalia, biscuit (cookie) tins, as they are of the old fashioned, idealised and endearing, but this series book are more than just a nostalgic look at life in the early 1900’s but in fact have deep roots and have been a profound influence on the Dutch education system. I’ve edited some information from Wikipedia (link below) which tells us: “Ot en Sien” are a series of children’s book written by a teacher in the Dutch province of Drenthe in the Netherlands.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Ot (“en” translates as “and”) Sien are the main charactors of the books which were very popular in the first half of the twenthieth century, with the first series “Dicht bij Huis (“Close to home”) appearing in 1902 and the second series Nog bij Moeder (“Still with mother”), following in 1904.

Hindericus Scheepstra was influenced and inspired by Jan Ligthart, who had the intention to expose young people to what he considered a healthy daily family life.

Ot (short for Otto) and Sien (short for e.g. Francine) are next door neighbors, a boy and a girl.

Their illustrations were based on two children that lived in Jetses’ neighborhood. Drenthe at the time was the most impoverished province of the Netherlands where quite a few people were still living in dwellings constructed of peat and sods.

The abject poverty is nowhere to be seen in the stories that depict a very idealized and sanitised version of reality. After WWII the stories of Ot and Sien gradually went out of fashion and were often ridiculed for the unrealistic picture they gave of life in the province.

A century after their appearance there was a revival in the interest for the publications and in 2004 an exposition was held, focusing mostly on the artwork by Jetses.
Ligthart intended to give a description of daily family interactions, and set moral standards of behaviour with idealized examples on how to treat family, servants and guests.

Ligthart’s philosophy was followed by many teachers in elementary schools in the Netherlands and the “Ot en Sien” books became a ubiquitous teaching tool for reading in elementary schools. This phenomenon lasted until deep in the 1950s and is one of the most remarkable developments in education in the country.

Generations of children in the ever more urbanizing and sub-urbanizing society grew up with an idyllic and rather unrealistic view of what family life should be like and apparently was like in the country side of Drenthe. Few city children ever experienced that, and their parents certainly did not have a servant in the house.

Knowing this, one is also aware that small town life is usually less expensive Still in the eighties, Ot en Sien were very present in the lives of the children that grew-up in Drenthe, their stories are a classic and loved both by young and old.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

They have left a strong impression on those who had the luck of having a simple and perhaps a somewhat naíve childhood, growing-up in this province.
In the Hague a statue of Ot and Sien was erected in 1930.

The text was to read “In memory of Jan Ligthart” but his widow Marie Lion Cachet objected to this because she knew that her husband had not actually written the stories, although he had given his friend Scheepstra continuous advice.

Scheepstra had the advantage that he was a Drenthe native and so could add a measure of local color to the stories. The inscription therefore was amended to “In memory of Jan Ligthart and H. Scheepstra“. Later the town of Roden in Drenthe also dedicated a monument to Ot and Sien and their creators.
It was the start of a new method of writing children’s books and had profound influence on Dutch primary (elementary) school education in the first half of the twentieth century”
I will go into the detail of why this was a new method in a future blog post (First I have to dig out some antique gems that I was lucky enough to find and bargain hard for at a flee market just after I arrived in the Netherlands, take photographs and do a little more research). This post therefore focuses on the illustrations by Jetses, because the images are beautiful… even though they might not be exactly telling the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

December 20, 2015

Getting To The Final Grain Of Sand…

This post from the Garderen Sand Sculpture Exhibition contains a few Sand Sculpture books on the children’s book theme that Himself and I could not identify. The ones I did get however are: “Swiebertje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Jip en Janneke…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Sjaki en de Chocoladefabriek…” (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Molletje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Dik Trom…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“De Negerhut van Ome Tom…” (Uncle Tom’s Cabin)…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This one is the first of my “mystery” books..

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

… and here is my second mystery offering…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

And now another one that everyone knows… “Smurfs…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Then I got a postcard that sums up the exhibition this year…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 19, 2015

Maybe I Am Just Reading Far More Into It Than I Needed To….

Whilst visiting the 2015 Sand Sculpture Exhibition in Garderen this year I was perplexed about the letters marked out in the indoor section that went under the themes of this year: Children’s Books. Because there was a competition to name all of the sculptures here I first assumed that these were clues to break the puzzel. Now however I am more thinking that maybe I was looking too deeply, and that these are just random letters that together also fit together into the “reading” theme… Today’s books that have been the central reading stock of many a Dutch child are:  “Beertje Paddington… (Paddington Bear)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“De Grote Vriendelijke Reus…(The Big Friendly Giant)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Flipje van de Betuwe…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Jan Jans en de Kinderen… (Jan Jans and The Children)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Kikker en Pad…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Mickey Mouse…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Nijntje… (a.k.a. “Miffy” outside of the Netherlands)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Pinkeltje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Woezel en Pip…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 18, 2015

Everything Seen Through The Eyes Of A Child…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The “Children’s Book” theme of the 2015 Gardren Sand Sculpture exhibition continues… Today’s books are: “Alice in Wonderland”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Dolfje Werewolfje…”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Erik of het Kleine Insectenboek…  (Erik of the Small Insect book)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Peter Konijn van Beatrix Potter… (Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter)”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

December 17, 2015

More Pages Of Children’s Books Turned…

Following yesterday’s post we are looking at Sand Sculptures in the 2015 Exhibition, all of which in this section follow the theme “Children’s Books…” Starting with: “In de soete suikerbol”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“SinterKlaas”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Arendsoog”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Pietje Bell …”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Sand Sculpture Garderen / Zandsculpturen Garderen

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