Local Heart, Global Soul

December 27, 2015

The Last Evening Of A Wonderful Weekend…

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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On our last evening of the 2015 Pinkstra long weekend we decided that eating out would be better than trying to find grocery shops open on a public holiday . We had deliberately only planned on cooking one evening meal this weekend, for two reasons: first because Himself and I fancied some time off from the kitchen, and secondly because I get out so rarely these days I wanted to make the very best of the opportunity.

On another note: my computer crashed and I resized these photos via Paint because  Windows Rezizer doesn’t seem to want to work… are these resized right? Feedback would be appreciated 🙂

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

December 26, 2015

The Greenery Is Temporarily Blank …

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I’m trying to sort out my internet and photographic problems, and will retrospectively post the photos as soon as I have found a solution. I apologise that in the meantime this post is sans photos, the technology situation is getting tiring for our kids too, they appear to be substituting their allocation of time on the iPad or computer with fighting with each other as much as possible. …or maybe that’s something that”s become a better sport than the iPad or computer ever were. I have a teenager and a pre-teen in the house after all and we are a very normal family with normal parents and kids. C’est la vie…

We are still in the Landal Colderhoven holiday park in the Veluwe. One thing that I love about renting a holiday house with a garden is that I get the chance to attempt to photograph some of the greenery around the garden. There are pine-cones, flowers and leaves, and since I’ve always struggled when it comes to photographing  them so a little practice is a good thing. Let’s take a look…

 

December 24, 2015

The Waiting Game Pays Off And The Results Are Priceless…

Filed under: Gelderland: The Veluwe,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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squirrel 1a (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Regular readers know that I live in the city of the Hague and like many a large European Dutch city, garden spaces are hard to come by, not to mention expensive.

Places like the Veluwe are the closest  the Netherlands has to a large national park (although there are smaller areas of wilderness of course) and the chance to see wildlife that is more than just a seagull, crow or pidgeon.

Squirrels are non-existant in New Zealand so much to the amusement of my Dutch husband, I’m like a kid in a sweet shop when I see one, even to date the number of times I’ve seen a squirrel in my life I can count on one hand… and each time is as exciting as the first time.

Yes, my husband laughs, but these little animals are natures genious, shy, beautiful, funny, graceful, photogenic, they are one of my favourite animals and it’s the highlight of my holiday if I can get a photograph.

I’d packed birdseed, a fat-ball, raw peanuts and sunflower seeds and put them out as soon as we arrived so that the local wildlife community would understand that our address for these few days came with breakfast lunch and dinner to be shared with my furry and feathered friends.

For some reason, even getting up at the crack of dawn with the camera for an early morning quiet photoshoot,  the camera well hidden behind closed curtains with only the lens poking out (using half a dozen clothes pegs), the first two mornings the table remained unvisited.

Himself and the eagle eyed kids spotted glimpses of red fur, scurrying up trees at lightening speed on several occasions during the day and Himself saw several at close range whilst out on an early morning walk, so assured me that they are close by, they just were not appearing anywhere within camera range.

I therefore hauled myself out of bed at an indecent hour on the last morning with not much hope. It seemed that squirrels like sleeping in as much as I do because the first hour was without even a rustle of a leaf, but all of a sudden there he was (or she, who knows?) … first on the grass and then onto the table.

I took a few shots and went to get the kids, especially the little friend of Little Mr who I know for sure has never seen a squirrel. She had just woken up and her sleepy half closed eyes opened in sheer amazement as she peeked and watched through the curtains. Despite all attempts to keep three kids still and quiet, after a few minutes they were too loud, the spell was broken and the squirrel fled and did not return.

The smile on our little guest friends face reflected mine, and later when she saw her mother back at home it was one of the first of her new experiences that she told about. Priceless… I only managed a few photographs, but Thank You little squirrel for making our day.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1f (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1g (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

squirrel 1h (Small)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Additional note…

(sigh) Photo problems again… will get them to you a.s.a.p. after getting a computer friend’s advice. (done!)

December 23, 2015

The “Pizza” That Might Just Possibly Kill You…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Children never cease to amaze me. Little Mr has a neighbourhood friend along for this Pinksteren, (“Pentecost” in English) long weekend trip to the Veluwe.

Since there was a shop on the Landal Colderhoven site that stocked everything from swim goggles, snorkels, toys, gadgets, hiking gear, postcards, groceries and of course sweets (candy), Himself and I decided that the best way to avoid being constantly pestered was to give each kid Euro 20,– to spend as they wished. (Within reason, naturally).

I was extremely impressed to see that our little guest without hesitation spent time and a great deal of thought in choosing gifts for her little brother and her parents. In fact, apart from a few small coins loose change, she spent the entire amount on them, and when I asked if she maybe wanted to get a small souvenir for herself she modestly replied “No, I have a lovely holiday away, my little brother and my parents couldn’t come so I would rather spend it on them since they have missed out”.

My heart melted at her whole-hearted generosity: this is kid who comes from one income family, the father is self employed and the economic crisis has meant a big down-turn in work so they often struggle to make ends met.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Holidays are of course out of the question so even a weekend away like this is a big deal to her, she and Little Mr get on brilliantly and she is appreciating and loving every minute of her stay. Even eating in the restaurant has her wide eyed and looking apprehensive as I gently coach her through how to go through the menu, give her choice to the people serving us etc.

She is very shy, well mannered kid, a little scared in new situations but soaking up every new experience like a sponge and growing with confidence before our eyes. For us, since the holiday house sleeps six it was no trouble to bring her with us, she gets on well with both Little Mr and Kiwi Daughter and her presence means that our children find plenty to do that doesn’t include fighting themselves silly and picking fault with each other every moment of the day for the entire long weekend. Win Win !!!

There was a seat near the entrance to the shop where I sat whilst the kids browsed and considered their purchases. I’d had a word to the lady behind the till to inform her that I was taking a supervisory role whilst the kids spent their money and asked if this was ok. It was. The kids bought me things to look at and ask advice, quality, value for money, practicality etc.

They carefully put back rejected items from whence they came, the shop wasn’t busy and the lady at the till kept a smiling eye on the proceedings. All of a sudden Little Mr appeared before me with the biggest grin imaginable on his face: “I’d like to buy a Pizza please Mama, Please, please, please, please, please?”.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I smelled a rat, he was pulling faces trying hard to look cute and innocent, his eyes were pleading, the hope was visible in his eyes.

There was a catch in this for sure, my Mama Alert Radar was firing on all cylinders, something was fishy here, there was absolutely not a shadow of doubt.

The “Pizza” appeared from behind his back… a small box, too small for real pizza, but decently sized all the same…cold and plastic wrapped.

The truth dawned, this was a “pizza” of the sweet variety, pure, unadulterated sugar complete with more “E” numbers than I ever want to see, or know exist, ever. Ugh. Now I have to look at these pleading eyes, he knows I really really, really, want to say “No, that’s the sugar shock from Hell, just looking at it might induce a diabetic coma, it’s pure rubbish, please go and put it back”.

Those pleading eyes… that visible hope… I notice out of the corner of my eye that Little Friend is shyly looking towards us, I read hope in her face too… I cave in and administer conditions that include more tooth brushing then he’s ever done in his life… The face of my son first registers shock and surprise that I said “Yes“, I see the comprehension dawn on him, then pure joy that he has what he has been pleading for and didn’t really expect to get.

I get a hug so hard that it hurt, and hear “:Thank you Mama, Thank you Mama, You are the Best Mama!, You are the Best Mama!, Thank you Mama!” all the way as he dashes to pay, he is jumping up and down on the spot like a jumping bean, whilst he waits for his purchase to be rung up, he is so excited he cannot contain his glee.

Needless to say the lady at the till has been watching and is now grinning widely too. When Little Mr did his bouncing bean impression at the till, it was the final straw and the lady lost it and began to laugh. I call out a joke that he’s like this even before the sugar shock has been unwrapped, please pity me after he has eaten some of this. She laughs even harder.  Little Mr is quick to share his “Pizza”, mostly with his guest and even his sister got to pick out something from it.
Ew, this thing is certainly diabetes on a plate, a sugar shock from Hell… But the pleasure of this sickly treat was clearly heavenly (and he was even careful to make it last the entire long weekend). Who doesn’t need a guilty pleasure once in a while?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

March 28, 2015

Childlike Puzzles And Behaviour In More Ways Than One…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In the very last of this series of sandcastle posts I enter second indoor hall where the theme of the sandcastles is: Dutch children’s nursery rhymes and children’s songs.

There are slips of paper by the entrance and notifications that there is also a competition to name all of the titles of the nursery rhymes and songs on display.

I didn’t bother entering for two reasons:  firstly I spent my childhood in New Zealand, not the Netherlands so would have no hope in knowing all of these.

Secondly, walking with crutches is just too hard and by now I’m for too tired to be the least bit interested in juggling pencils and papers as well.

Truth be told this last stretch of walking is more than I bargained for, but it seems that proceeding will get me to the exit far faster then going back, so it’s a matter of  persevering for just a little bit longer.

Then, exiting this part of the exhibition, all things start to unravel on the family harmony front… Unbeknownst to me, Himself, our kids, our friend and her daughter accidently missed seeing this section of the exhibition , so exited after the outdoor sand sculpture area.

Naturally since I walk very slowly  they were already way ahead of me,  so after exiting they sat and had lunch, enjoyed a cold drink and afterwards the kids played on some trampolines that had been installed near a play area.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

They waited and waited and in the meantime I was doing the rounds at my slow pace behind them.

Of course I had no clue just how far behind them I was, nor did I have any way of  knowing that they have all missed an entire section of the display, so I exit this last section to find a frustrated family complaining that they have waited ages for me and a friend muttering about how tired her young daughter was an how she really wanted to go home now.

I apologise for walking slow and tell them that it’s not my fault that they missed seeing an entire section of the display and that since I’ve not had either a drink or lunch, or been to the toilet and it’s a really hot day that I’d at least appreciate getting a sandwich to eat in the car, a drink, and to have a pee pee please.

My request was met with five mummers of disapproval and dismay, and I got rather angry because all of them had eaten etc at their leisure and surely a toilet stop wasn’t too much to ask before a journey of several hours home?

One look at the toilet queue , food and drinks queue told me that this wasn’t going to just be an extra five minutes. With the others now complaining loudly I got really angry and took myself off to the car as loundly as my crutches could take me, and once there burst into tears.

I threw the crutches over the back seat as hard as I could in a fit of pique and old Himself to just get on and drive. Himself demanded to know what was up and I told him that I was disappointed at their selfishness that I couldn’t even get to go to the toilet.

By now the pain in my foot had reached astronomical heights and all I wanted to do was get home. Himself offered to turn the car around so that I could go back for a toilet stop but I decided that with the queue and complaining friend and kids that it was better to hold on and go at home. I was a rather sombre trip home after a falling out that probably most families recognise they have had themselves from one time or another.

Since many nursery rhyme titles don’t make a lot of sense in another language I didn’t bother to translate them here. The puzzle answers are:

“Vader Jakob”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Ik heb mijn wagen vol geladen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Al die willen te kaap ’ren varen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“In een blauw geruite kiel”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Roodborstje tikt aan het raam”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Drie kleine kleutertjes”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Ik zag twee beren broodjes smeren”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Poesje mauw”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Klein, klein kleutertje”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Amsterdam die grote stad is gebouwd op palen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“In Holland staat een huis”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Boer, wat zeg je van mijn kippen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Witte zwanen, zwarte zwanen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Berend Botje ging uit varen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Naar bed, naar bed zei Duimelot”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Opa bakkebaard”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“In een groen knollenland”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Twee emmertjes water halen”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Jan Huigen in de ton”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Altijd is Kortjakje ziek”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Hollebolle Gijs”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“De Zilvervloot”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“In den Haag daar woont een graaf”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Er zaten zeven kikkertjes”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

“Slaap, kindje, slaap”…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 27, 2015

The Dutch Golden Age Continues…

A photographic post, more sandcastles representing the Dutch Golden Age to drool over…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The exhibition doesn’t shy away from the part that slaves, as with the English, French, Portuguese, Americans at this time played in building the Dutch economy. There are always the less savory aspects to a nation’s history, but they are events of their time and hopefully mankind had learned from them. I’m fully aware that slavery still exits today and that the darker side of forced labour such as child labour and sweatshops do too, but hopefully the 21st century will be one where all of these become a thing of the past forever.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I struggled to get good photographs of these tulips, they were amazing and needed to be seem up close in person to get a glimpse of their true beauty… their simplicity and detail just don’t come out in the photographs as I intended.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Christiaan Huygens discovered the rings of Saturn…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 26, 2015

How On Earth Do They Manage To Make The Detail Defy Belief?

There are many more sand sculptures to see in the “Veluws Zandsculpturenfestijn”  (Veluwe Sand Sculpture Festival)  that takes place annually in  Garderen,  Today’s post features sand sculptures of  Johan and Cornelis de Witt,  and entire table of figures from the VOC  (Dutch East India Company), the detail of which defied belief, I mean how on earth did they sculpt the rims of the hats, the pierced work in the crown at the very top? … but enough of me drooling over them all,  you really need to see for yourselves…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

 

 

March 25, 2015

Finding A Sand Box, But More Accurately A Sand Trunk…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Following yesterday’s archive post, I have moved outside from the indoor sand exhibition, to find not just bright sunlight but also an area packed with huge sand sculptures.

The images of famous people are often life-sized or near so and the detail goes way beyond what a camera can capture.

Sand sculpture artists have the added talent of knowing how light sets off their works, the shadow lines are often just as important as the actual sculpted ones.

Even a small movement by the viewer reveals depths and details that are truly beautiful.

The camera is unable to fully capture this aspect of the designs so if you ever have the opportunity to see a sand sculpture exhibition in person, I’d completely recommend it.

As in the previous photographs, the sculptures depict the Dutch Golden Age, and many famous historical figures are represented.

Having grown up in New Zealand with an Anglo Saxon slant on the history I was taught, I an not fully up to date with every single scene and figure here. I do however know quite a few of them: for instance, the large trunk at the end of this day’s photographic series is an important clue as to the figure nearby because Huge de Groot (1583 – 1645) famously hid in a wooden trunk.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

From the website (link below) :“De Groot was one of the world’s greatest ever legal experts and many of his works are the foundation of the modern Western legal system. 

From 1610, a religious conflict emerged between the Remonstrants and counter-Remonstrants. Hugo de Groot allied himself with the Remonstrants, which led Stadholder Prince Maurits to sentence him to life imprisonment, first in The Hague and later in Loevestein castle. 

From time to time, guards would deliver large trunks full of books back and forth between De Groot and his family in Gorinchem.

But on 22 March 1621, Hugo managed to smuggle himself into the trunk, so that his unsuspecting guards carried him outside, where he fled to Paris. 

The story became legendary, and to this day a number of trunks are said to be the very one that Hugo de Groot used to escape in. One of those is in the Prinsenhof in Delft.”

I visited Loevestein Castle some five years ago and learned the story of Hugo de Groot then, so the sight of a large trunk was an instant give-away. I’ve added the links to posts from my castle visit Loevestein to the end of this post. I really enjoy seeing  history and art intermingled and to see that  the details from important events and influential people of the past  have been put on show in such a way that people of all generations can enjoy them in a fun and informative manner.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

http://oudeennieuwekerkdelft.nl/new-church/famous-people/hugo-de-groot

Loevestein Castle, it’s All about location, location, location…

Slot Loevestein Castle and Tourist trap dining…

Sheep in the “garden” and other Unexpected Views…

A Castle and the equivalent of the Penthouse View…

And my kids think they are hard done by, because we have no Dishwasher!

What’s a Kruittoren? …Ka BOOM! Now THERE’s a hint!

Castle at Rest and at Play…and Everything in-between.

Think that living in a Castle would be a Fairy Tale?, Think again!

Hugo Grotius (Hugo de Groot), Escape artist extraordinaire…

The car and the Veerpont… in search of a Castle

March 24, 2015

Mirror, Mirror On The Wall, In You I Can Not See At All…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Today post is a continuation of yesterday’s post where Family Kiwidutch,  a friend and her  daughter stopped on their way back from the Veluwe to visit  Garderen in the Dutch province of Gelderland.

We had seen some advertising for some seriously amazing sculptures in sand and had made  detour to come and see for ourselves.

The theme of the exhibition this year is  “Experience the Golden Age”  meaning the Dutch Golden Age of the  17th Century, when the spice trade was at it’s peak, internal trading was producing riches  and single tulip bulbs were selling for the price of of the average house.

The Arts were not only prospering but the country was producing some of the best artists both of their generation, and throughout the history of art.

This series of sand sculptures depict the mirror making trade, the blacksmith in his forge, and scenes from the tavern (which often doubled as the local bawdy house / brothel).

This was an era when beer was healthier and less contaminated than the local canal water, even toddlers drank weak beer, so breweries were everywhere and trades both above and below board associated with them were rampant.

One sculpture gives us a sly peek into the world of the pickpocket who is busy plying his trade,taking advantage of the joviality and drunkenness of the revellers.

There are also beautiful examples of the Dutch pottery and tile industry, which contrary to popular opinion does not always have to only consist of blue and white pieces (although of course Delftsware is best known for that).

Many historical items and antique pieces have been added to the exhibition so it’s not just sand on display. I pass by the shop area and then spy the door leading to the outside area… more sculptures await!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

March 23, 2015

The 17th Century: The Dutch Golden Age…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

This archive post finds us in the small Gelderlandse village of Garderen in an area of the Netherlands called the Veluwe.

Family Kiwidutch had taken advantage of the fact that there had been a long weekend and joined extended family members and Oma (Grandmother) in holiday homes a short drive way so that Oma, now in her 90’s could enjoy spending time with us in as big a collective family group as possible and for an extended period of time.

After seeing an advertisement for this exhibition, our family left the holiday park early on the last day so that we could detour here and enjoy seeing the sand sculptures for ourselves. The theme of this year’s exhibition is  “Experience the Golden Age”

The website: Holland.com (link at bottom of this post) tells us:

” The Dutch Golden Age encompasses most of the seventeenth century.

The first half of the century was taken up by the Eighty Years’ War: the Dutch War of Independence from Spain. After winning their independence, the united Dutch Republic ran the country in peace for the last half of the century.

During this time, Dutch explorers charted new territory and settled abroad. Trade by the Dutch East-India Company thrived, and war heroes from the naval battles were decorated and became national heroes. During this time, The Dutch Old Masters began to prevail in the art world, creating a depth of realistic portraits of people and life in the area that has hardly been surpassed.”

Important people from this time are depicted in sand sculptures and important trades: Coopers, who made barrels that carried goods world wide on ships, candle makers working with their rows of dipped candles,  and there are many other scenes, women looking out to sea awaiting the safe return of their menfolk, bakers and klompen (clog / wooden shoe makers).

Piet Pieterzoon Hein 1577 – 1629. Netherlands Lieutenant General and commandant in the West Indies Campagne…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Rembrandt Harmenzoon van Rijn (1606 – 1669) Artist

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

 

http://www.holland.com/us/tourism/article/history-of-dutch-golden-age.htm

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