Local Heart, Global Soul

November 27, 2017

Let’s Change, Let’s Not, Let’s Change, Let’s Not…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Baarle-Nassau / Baarle-Hertog enclave and counter enclave situation has been around since 1190. The next logical question would be: “Why not have both countries resolve this odd territorial entity some time in the next eight hundred years? I found some text the answered this question:

“What is remarkable is that the partition of the territory did not change across all succeeding historical events. Many opportunities presented themselves to eliminate the Baarle enclaves over the course of the last 800 years, but none succeeded.

* 1327 – 1339 – There was no Lord of Breda. The Land of Breda belonged directly to the ducal domains. The fiefs held from the Lord of Breda were now held from the Duke in Brussels. We can still see the mix up with “real” ducal fiefs like those of Baarle-Hertog in the registers in Brussels.

In 1334 a number of villages, including Baarle-Breda, were pawned to Van Liedekerke. During the short period 1327 – 1334 it would have been easy to erase the enclaves in all those villages, but it did not happen.

* 1388 – The Duchess of Brabant was in need of money to wage war. To raise these funds she sold or pawned a number of ducal domains. In 1388 her jurisdiction over the enclaves in the Land of Breda was pawned to the Lord of Breda. The pawn was never redeemed.

However, the jurisdiction over Baarle belonged since 1356 to her sister Maria of Brabant (Land of Turnhout) and was therefore not a part of this transaction. Thus while most enclaves disappeared already in 1388, those in Baarle escaped.

* From around 1500 the Kings of Spain were Lord over the 17 Provinces in the Low Countries previously ruled by Burgundy. The 80 Years War split these 17 Provinces into the Republic of the 7 United Provinces and the rest, known as the “Southern Netherlands”. The northern part of the old Duchy of Brabant was annexed by the Republic which acquired the status of occupied territories under the name “Staats Brabant”. In 1648 Spain and other countries officially recognized the Republic.

As far as Baarle is concerned, Henry III was followed as Count of Nassau and Lord of Breda by René of Chalons, Prince of Orange (in France) and then by William of Orange, the central figure in the Dutch revolt against Spain. From there the line runs down to Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands in our own day.

* In the North the Republic of the 7 United Provinces survived up to 1795. Then from 1795 to 1806 these provinces form the so-called “Batavian Republic” with “Bataafs Brabant” (the former “Staats-Brabant”) as a normal province. From 1806 to 1810 they form the Kingdom of Holland; from 1810 they are part of the French Empire until they are liberated at the end of 1813 with William of Orange as sovereign.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

* In the South the rule of the Spanish King gives way to that of the Austrian emperor. Then in 1793 comes annexation by France, first as part of the Republic and then of the Empire, with liberation at the end of 1813, when the Congress of Vienna decides that the North and South shall be united under King William of Orange I as the United Kingdom of the Netherlands.

* 1830 – The two are split again: in the South we have the Kingdom of Belgium; in the North the Kingdom of the Netherlands. One half-province (the eastern part of greater Luxemburg) becomes a separate Grand Duchy initially under William I but from 1890 under its own Grand Dukes.

* 1648 – With the Peace of Munster of 1648, one of the treaties of Westphalia putting an end to the 30 Years War and also to the 80-Year-War of the Netherlands against Spain, it was decided that the portion of Baarle under the Count of Nassau should be added to the “Generaliteitslanden” (The United Provinces), because this part belonged to the Baronie de Breda; and that the portion of Baarle belonging to the Land of Turnhout should be added to the Spanish Southern Netherlands (the present Belgium).

In this way the enclaves survived the Peace of Munster.

* 1789 – In the Treaty of Fontainebleau of 1785, between the Dutch Republic and Emperor Joseph II, a committee was ordered to make proposals for the exchange of territories so that the enclaves would disappear. Protests from Baarle-Hertog delayed the work of the committee so much that nothing happened before the annexation of the Southern Netherlands by France.

* 1830 – Between 1810 – 1832 the whole of the Netherlands (North and South) was measured and mapped for the land taxes imposed by the French Empire and later the Kingdom of the United Netherlands. Each “village” became a cadastral municipality.

It was then thought wise to make one cadastral municipality “Baarle” and the maps and registers were made on that basis.

But Baarle-Hertog was part of the province of Antwerp and Baarle-Nassau was part of Noord-Brabant. So a formal provincial border correction was needed.

Everything was prepared and agreed upon informally. The provincial government of Noord-Brabant agreed to the proposals on July 5th and the Antwerp provincial government planned to do so in September 1830. In the summer of 1830, however, there occurred the Belgian Revolution. So the unified cadastral municipality had to be split up once again. This was done by colouring the Belgian parcels on the cadastral maps.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

But some parcels were forgotten in this process, and some could not be dealt with so easily since they were partly Belgian and partly Dutch: these had been thrown together into single parcels because the mapmakers had assumed that the partition of the village would shortly disappear.

* 1843 – The Treaty of Maastricht of 1843 delimited the boundary between the Netherlands and Belgium, but even then it was found impossible to compromise on the territory of Baarle. It was instead decided to leave things as they stood, for it was impossible to define the boundary between boundary poles 214 and 215 (about 50 km).

Instead of defining a boundary, it was accepted that the nationality of 5732 parcels be established one by one (the colouring on the cadastral maps). A part of these parcels constitute the (at least) twenty Belgian enclaves, presently Baarle Hertog, which are situated either within the territory of the Dutch municipality of Baarle-Nassau or, in the case of the agrarian region of Zondereigen, in the surrounding land.

Most of them lie about five km beyond the Belgian border, but there is also a small enclave of Baarle-Nassau inside Belgium and even a Belgian parcel within a Dutch parcel within a Belgian enclave surrounded by Dutch territory. This bizarre situation has obviously led to a number of difficulties – hence the repeated attempts at normalization.

* 1875 – A new committee, set up by Belgium, began its exploration of the possibilities for an exchange of territories in 1875. Only in 1892 was a draft agreement between the both countries ready, but it was not accepted by both parliaments.

* 1996 – In 1996 plans were made to form bigger municipalities in the Netherlands and in Belgium. So Baarle-Hertog would become a part of Turnhout and Baarle-Nassau would form together with Alphen and Chaam a new entity (the “ABC-municipality”).
This implied that the distance between the two centers of municipal government, now about 200 meters, would increase to 15 kilometers. This would make the long-existing strong contacts between both municipalities rather impossible. Both the Dutch and the Belgian parliaments voted against the disappearance of the municipalities of Baarle-Nassau and Baarle-Hertog. So they still exist although they are in population terms among the smallest municipalities of both countries.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The Story of Baarle
http://ontology.buffalo.edu/smith//baarle.htm

November 26, 2017

When Land Ownership Got Very Complicated Indeed…

Filed under: BAARLE Nassau/Hertog,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In my first post about Baarle I looked at the strange enclave and counter enclave situation here.

Of course this is the main reason we are here this weekend; to look at how this conundrum works itself out on the ground.

So, How is it possible that parcels of land within one country can belong to a neighbouring country? Even more, how can some of these parcels of land end up with bits of the host country inside them?

The answer is complicated, and like most good tales of strange land titles and border irregularities, goes back a few centuries (or in this instance, between eight and nine hundred years).

‘In the 12th century Baarle is located in a rather peripheral region in which none of the regional counts (of Holland, Louvain/Brabant, Gelre) or bishops (Utrecht, Liège) enjoys a firm grip on the surrounding territory. A number of local lords owned their own village and some of them succeeded in becoming a regional lord, like the Lord of Breda.

In the period 1190 – 1235 the Count of Louvain/Brabant expanded his power from the south over a large part of this region, while the Count of Holland expands from the Northwest.

A big clash occurred in 1203, from which time both regions of influence were more or less clearly demarcated. In the years before 1203 the Lord of Breda took sides with Louvain/Brabant while the Lord of Strijen elected for Holland.

Indeed the Count of Louvain gave up all his claims in the north west and gave them in fief to the Lord of Breda. Those documents are now dated “ca. 1198”. Other local and regional lords in that part of the region called “Brabant” from 1203 were afterwards swallowed up by Brabant without such compensation. Only after 1235 does the Count of Louvain/Brabant present himself as Duke of Brabant.

Baarle was at this time not the only collection of enclaves and the enclaves were not the only inhabited parcels. The count of Louvain kept his personal feudal link with the people in the region that already before 1198 had sided with him.

These persons and their houses and fields in various places like Heerle, Roosendaal, Nispen, Sprundel, Hage, Zundert, Wernhout and in Baarle, came to fall under the jurisdiction of Zandhoven, a countal court east of Antwerp.
In the medieval sources you can find “Hage-Hertog”, “Zundert-Hertog” and so on, and not only “Baarle-Hertog”. In fact Baarle-Hertog consists completely of ducal fiefs and fiefs of rented out parcels of those fiefs. Dating from that moment, a difference was born between those parts of Baarle under the Duke of Brabant, and those parts of Baarle (and Heerle, Wernhout, etc.) under the Lordship of Breda.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

The presuppositions for the existence of BAARLE-NASSAU were thus created around 1198, but it is only from 1404, when the Counts of Nassau in Germany became also Lord of Breda, that the name “Baarle-Nassau” can be found.”

This is how there came to be a complex network of enclaves and counter enclaves, and why the village has a Dutch name “Baarle-Nassau” and also a Belguium one: “Baarle-Hertog’.”

I wondered how it was not possible for piece of Dutch land to be sold to a person from Belgium, or visa versa and for this land situation to be resolved.

This however is not possible because the soil itself comes as part of each countries jurisdiction and remains so, no matter the nationality of the owner.

All over the village and surrounding area are markers to show where the borders of the two countries are.

Painted crosses are mostly on pavements, small silver circular disks demark streets, with one side of the street being Dutch, the other half belonging to Belgium.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

November 23, 2017

I Can Hear Voices From The Past…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Standing in front of the old “Stadhuis” (Town Hall) in Baarle Nassau is not just the two hundred year old pump of yesterdays post but also something far more modern.

The item in question is a local and visitor information memorial piece, from a series called the “Liberation Route Europe“.

I learn from their website that: “Liberation Route Europe is a continuously growing, international remembrance trail that connects important milestones from modern European history. It forms a link between the main regions along the Western Allied Forces’ advance from southern England, to the beaches of Normandy, the Belgian Ardennes, South Eastern provinces of the Netherlands, the Hürtgen Forest and on to Berlin.

The route then continues to the Polish city of Gdansk, where a democratic revolution for overcoming the division of Europe was launched nearly two generations later. Since 2016 the Liberation Route Europe started the development of the Southern route, starting in Sicily.

This marker in Baarle commemorates the “The Battle of the Scheldt” and the information panel tells us: “What happened on and around this place during the liberation days in the autumn of 1944? You can hear and see these events at these Liberation Route Europe posts.

For the Allies, the port of Antwerp was of great strategic importance. They could only use it if these banks of the Scheldt and the roads to it were free of German troops. And so, during the Battle of the Scheldt, the war raged in all its horror. With all the tragic consequences for the military and civilians. Turn the wheel and listen to their experiences. Or download it free via http://www.liberationroute.com or via the app.”

There is a second paragraph on the board that tells us: “The 28 days of Baarle“, “On the 1st of October 1944, the 1st Polish Armoured Division enters the Netherlands to the south of Baarle-Nassau. But it will take 28 days before the german troops were completely driven out of this area. Meanwhile, the local residents wait on events in their shelters.”

Going to the Liberation Route Europe website and finding the page that concerns Baarle, I also discover a slightly more expanded text about events here: “On Sunday the 1st of October 1944, led by General Maczek, the 1st Polish Armoured Division began military operations in West Brabant. They entered the Netherlands at the village of Zondereigen. The inhabitants of Baarle sought refuge in shelters. They would spend a lot of time in them, because Baarle was only liberated after 28 days. The German army had reinforced its troops. Led by Hauptmann Mager, the 2nd Battalion of the 6th Fallschirmjäger Regiment participated in the fighting.

Through a shrewd tactic, German paratroopers destroyed dozens of Polish tanks. General Maczek had to wait a long time for reinforcements. They had to be transported all the way from Normandy. The residents of Baarle had to helplessly watch their village being turned into smoking rubble. The destruction of the impressive Belgian church, in particular, made a deep impression. On the 28th of October 1944, Baarle is finally liberated.”

As I have mentioned many times previously, I feel it is important to keep history alive, not just because of the sacrifices that others made on our behalf, but also because I hope that learning from the mistakes of history means never having to repeat them.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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General Maczek

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Damage to the Remigius church…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Liberation Route Europe
https://liberationroute.com/pages/liberation-route-europe

August 30, 2017

Showing Some Amazing Flexibility…

Filed under: GOUDA,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Having found the site of the Gouda’s Molenwerf and (rather disassembled) Motte of yesterdays post, I find myself passing a small garden.

My destination at this moment though, was to find the house behind the motte that had the fish ornamentation   which was at the back.

The only way to it was via two small bridges on a tight curve. Having photographed the “fish house” I turn my lens to a building directly opposite it, one that can not fail to capture a visitors attention.

It’s quirky leanings had me wondering about  structural integrity and how on earth it was possible for a small building to be leaning out at the spot over the doorway and leaning in at the end of the same wall just a short distance away.

This is what  building would look like if it were drunk. It also looked like someone thin, frail and elderly who bends at the knees, and has at the same time hunched shoulders. That said, here is probably nothing thin about the walls in a building this old. Thick walls were standard in the 1600’s and this buildings stout construction helps it to bend when age and subsidence crept into it’s bones.

I am delighted to find that here is an information plaque on the side of the building, but as usual, only in Dutch,  translated here Thanks to Himself (I was tired and making mistakes).

The name of this building is “het Tapijthuis” (which literally means “carpet house’). “This late medieval building owes it’s name to the Flemish weavers who fled at the end of the 16th century to the northern part of the Netherlands (from an area that is now present day Belgium). In buildings such as these they continued their work where they left off when they had to flee. Later, in the 17th century,  it housed one of thekloppenscholenfrom Gouda. 

Aklopjeis a woman who does the work of a nun but who is not a nun herself.  (teaching, visiting sick etc) Such catholic schools were prohibited, but the city council  in Gouda did not enforce that rule. At regular intervals the church council of the adjacent St Jans church (Protestant) asked for the school to be closed, but in vain. At a later stage it housed a brewery and after that, the auction house of the father of the writer Herman de Man.

It’s interesting to see that in a time when relations between Protestants and Catholics was fractious, that some people and organisations such as the city council of the time exercised common sense. They must have seen the good work in the community done by these “klopje” women and found that this contribution overruled the pesterings and annoyance of the St Jans church council.

This Catholic / Protestant divide is a theme that I will expand upon in a future post,  since I have discovered some quirky information about this that is bizarre when seen from a non-European perspective. That however is for another day. (Soon!). The occupants and use of ” het Tapijthuis” changed greatly with the times and so over the centuries this building has both literally and figuratively shown some amazing flexibility.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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This last photograph if the rear of the building…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

August 29, 2017

A Water Course Of Course…

Filed under: GOUDA,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My next stop at the back of St Jans Church in Gouda, is called “Molenwerf en Motte“.

There is a substantial building here and attached an Information board in Dutch.

Translated into English it reads: “”Molenwerf en Motte”.

In the 12th century there was a fortification at this location: a round, several meters high wall, a so called “motte”.

To the east of it, up to the Groeneweg was a major courtyard and homestead with living quarters stables, grainery and such.

To the west of the ‘burchtheuvel” (man made mound /motte) were the buildings forming the ‘voorhofstede” (buildings situated just before the homestead).

All of this belonged to the Lords van der Goude, the Lords of the city of Gouda.

Also a private chapel on the location of the current St Jans Church formed part of their domain.

The city of Gouda grew around this borough. The high motte itself was only used in times of war and flooding, the first dikes were only made in the 12th century. The motte and the homestead were destroyed as a resut of war,  probably in 1304.  Later on houses were constructed in the area and on the motte, a mill was built. That’s why the current road, that goes straight over the motte, which was removed in 1369 is therefore called “Molenwerf”. The old fortification can still be slightly recognised by the slightly higher circular moat. The molenwerf crosses it on two little  bridges. ”

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Underneath the illustration there is more text, which translated says:

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

In yellow letters parts of the possession of the Lords van der Goude
1,2,3; 14th century precursors  precursors to the city Hall (location is approximate)
4 and 5: 14th century house of local priest and latin School (location is approximate)
6: 14th century Catharina Gasthuis (hospital) on the location of the previous annexes to the homestead.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

You are standing here
Probable old water course
–    Watercourse

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August 10, 2017

Gouda Stadhuis: Disastrous Beginnings Lead To A Gem…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

‘In the Middle Ages the Van der Goude family built a settlement and fortified castle alongside the banks of the Gouwe River, and it is from this that the city of Gouda took its name.

Located on the Market Square Gouda’s fifteenth century “Stadhuis” (town hall) is one of the oldest Gothic town halls in the Netherlands. 

In the summer of 1438, a devastating fire reduced Gouda almost to ashes.

The wooden town hall was very badly damaged.

The town council decided that the new town hall should be a freestanding stone building, well away from other buildings in order to protect it from the danger of future fires.

A market field, little more than a peat bog was bought and in 1448 construction began, having been postponed many times due to the  poor financial situation of Gouda city.

One of the stonemasons was Jan III Keldermans, a member of a Brabant family of architects Keldermans from Mechelen. The building was built from Belgian limestone.

The foundation did not use piles as was common in many places, but rather frames of heavy oak beams.

Construction was officially completed with the completion of the turret in 1459 but the building was already in use after 1450. 

According to the historian Walvis, the town hall was surrounded by water by 1603 and could be reached by means of a bridge. In that year (1603), the current renaissance style borders were made by the city sculptor Gregorius Cool.

During 1692-1697 a major refurbishment took place again and the present stone scaffold built at the back of the town hall. Before that time there had already been a scaffold made of wood for public executions at the town hall as evidenced in texts as far back as 1525.

Until 1897 access to the scaffold was made by means of a wooden staircase on the outside of the town hall. It was not permitted to walk prisoners inside the Stadhuis.‘  The information was not available in English so I translated it from the Dutch wiki page. This is a beautiful building with a long history… the events that have happened during it’s time here, if only the walls could speak. Even better this is just the back side of the building. As you can see, the Dutch weather varied considerably between visits, in the last photograph I like to think that the clouds were tying to emulate the “stepped” roof of the building!

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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Wikipedia:  Gouda Stadhuis  (City Hall) / (Dutch language)

August 9, 2017

A Very Fishy Feude…

Filed under: ART,GOUDA,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,Stone Carving,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

If you think that neighbourly disputes are a new phenomenon then you would be very much mistaken.

Next to “de Waag” (Weigh house) in Gouda is a large white building called “de Zalm” (The Salmon) and a permanent reminder of the neighbourly dispute between the two that took place in 1670 is set into the wall of “de Zalm’ that faces “de Waag“.

There is an information plaque on the wall but it’s only in Dutch so I’ve translated it into English.

The text is also a little bit higgledy piggledy so I’ve added some information so it makes sense and then marked out the original translated text in italics.

With the construction of the “de Waag” by famous architect Pieter Post, and in order ‘to guarantee the prestige of their new building, the city council demanded that it’s height become a benchmark for other buildings in the area.

The roof of the adjacent building,  the Inn called “de Zalm”, built in 1670 was required to be at least 6 feet lower than the Waag (also completed in 1670) according to city government regulations, much to the displeasure of it’s owner.

  This displeasure is recorded in stone with a picture of an angry looking salmon and the text (in old Dutch:)”Niet te hooch niet te laech van passe’, which means ‘not too high not too low, just right’.” It’s certainly a statement that the owner may have been forced to comply with the regulations but he didn’t have to like it.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

My weird sense of humour gives me a thought: what if all of today’s neighbourly disputes were recorded in such a way too? You (and your descendants) could walk around a neighbourhood and have a laugh at all of the petty things that get on people’s nerves.

I’d love to see walking tours that visit the houses of ” yappy dog, tall trees, untidy gardens, noxious weeds, party house” disputes and see appropriate pictures in stone with a well thought out text below. It might also make people realise that life is short and that many of these disputes could be settled amicably.

Strangely, benieth the text relevant to “de Zalm” is another paragraph that relates to, and in my opinion would be better included with other information plaques for, “de Waag“.

Again it’s only in Dutch, and even though it’s completely unrelated to the story of “de Zalm“, I will translate it here in case visitors find the Dutch and go looking for a translation. ”

‘The Gouda historian Ignatius Walvis  reports that for “de Waag”  to be built, several buildings on, or very close to the market were bought and demolished. The upper floor of  “de Waag’ was not important for the weighing and was used from 1668 to 1907 by the Gouda weapons / firearms  store.

Thereafter the space was used in succession as an exhibition room, Vet’s office, office of  a cleaning service,  local tourist office and a branch of the Dutch dairy board. Since 1995  “de Waag” has housed the Gouda Cheese museum (formerly known as the Gouda Cheese and Professional Craft Trades museum)’

I then found further information about “de Zalm” on a Wikipedia page (but in Dutch only.) Interestingly, “de Zalm” Restaurant’s own page does not appear to have a history page at all. I have translated the Wikipedia page:

‘In 1551 this inn had gone by the names of ‘de Oude Salm” (Old Salmon) or “de Vergulde Salm” (the Gilt Salm).

The owner feared that  the building of  “de Waag” (Weigh house) would overshadow his establishment so decided to build a new (and bigger) Inn. The city council permitted this but under strict regulations.’

‘The Inn was required to be six feet lower than “de Waag“. Displeased with this the innkeeper has laid down this requirement in 1670  with the text: Niet te hooch niet te laech van passe’,  (not too high, not too low, just right).

The premises has held a catering / hospitality function from 1551 until the present day, and could be the oldest inn in North and South Holland.  “de Zalm” was also an important station for the postal service between Amsterdam and Antwerp in the 19th century. To this end, a horse stable was built behind the hotel, which was converted into a “pannenkoeke” (pancake) restaurant in the 20th century.

On 5th May 1945, the District Commander of the National Armed Forces made the proclamation in “de Zalm” that the war was over and transferred power over the city. The liberation of Gouda was thus official. The building is listed as a Dutch national monument.  Finally, I notice that another fish has been added to “de Zalm’s” wall. It is two thirds of the way up, and an advertisement for the establishment. In a small twist, this fish has a smile instead of a frown: maybe the message is that after almost 350 years the feud is over?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

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(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia: “de Waag” (Weigh House) / Gouda/ The Netherlands / (Dutch text only)
Wikipedia: “de Zalm” (the salmon) / Gouda/ The Netherlands / (Dutch text only)
Brasserie – Bar / De Zalm  (The Salmon) / Gouda

July 24, 2017

A Stock Issue Of Houses And Barns…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Driving through Flevoland,  the Netherland’s newest province, we see some of the newest farmland in the world.

Work started in the 1930’s reclaiming land from the sea, and in the 1940’s and 50’s the polders took shape.

Then as mentioned in yesterday’s post, on 1st January 1986  the joining of the southern and eastern Flevopolders created the new province.

The farms and their out buildings were put in as the farm land took shape, government assistance meant that stock to a set pattern of both houses and barns were laid down, bringing  a distinct conformity of style as we drive the length of the polder.

This gives this area it’s own character, the style might not be modern in the newest sense or old in the centuries old style of much of the country but with the surrounding space and large gardens that these farms enjoy there is no doubting that these must be beautiful places to live.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

July 9, 2017

Texture And History…

Filed under: Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,Schokland,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

On Schokland I find yet another example of the centuries old sea defenses. The history and texture are evident.

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia (partial English translation of Dutch Wiki site)/ Schokland /Flevaland / The Netherlands.

July 4, 2017

An Idea Engraved In Stone…

Filed under: Flevoland,Historical,PHOTOGRAPHY,Schokland,THE NETHERLANDS — kiwidutch @ 1:00 am
Tags: ,

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

During my walk around the Schokland World Heritage site last year, I found beautiful things literally in the ground around me.

First there were stones, starting to get a covering of moss and lichen, full of texture, but then I saw several rows of stones of an entirely different sort.

Gravestones, a few that were probably in their original place, forming a neat line not too far from the church.

Close to another building lay three long rows of gravestone fragments, many with the inscriptions too worn or damaged to read, but a few were there with legible names and dates, most from the 1600’s.

I know that flooding often destroys graveyards so I think it may be safe to assume that these stones have been broken up this way.

I find old headstones interesting, I always wonder about the character of the person named and laid to rest: were they prominent people? what did they do in life? What did their life look like? Do they have living descendants? I wonder what some of these people would make of the idea that visitors are admiring their gravestones four hundred years after their lives ended? I hope they would be pleased that they have not been forgotten.  That idea… engraved in stone?

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

I rotated the previous photograph so that the text is slightly more legible…

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

(photograph © Kiwidutch)

Wikipedia (partial English translation of Dutch Wiki site)/  Schokland /Flevaland / The Netherlands.

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